References of "POIRRIER, Robert"
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See detailAdherence to Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) Therapy
Deflandre, Eric; Degey, Stéphanie; BONHOMME, Vincent ULg et al

in CHEST Journal (2014, March), 145

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See detailUpper airway imaging in sleep-disordered breathing.
POIRRIER, Anne-Lise ULg; Fanielle, Julien; Bruwier, Annick ULg et al

in Acta neurologica Belgica (2014)

Our understanding of sleep-disordered breathing has evolved considerably over the past three decades, and clinical techniques of evaluation have progressed tremendously. Myriad imaging techniques are now ... [more ▼]

Our understanding of sleep-disordered breathing has evolved considerably over the past three decades, and clinical techniques of evaluation have progressed tremendously. Myriad imaging techniques are now available for the physician to approach the dynamic features resulting in turbulent airflow, upper airway narrowing or collapse at different levels. Controversy exists in the choice of investigations, probably because the best evaluation should be a combination of different techniques. Physical, radiographic, endoscopic and acoustic evaluations could be integrated to understand the degree and the levels of airway reduction and/or obstruction in a given patient. This review focuses on cost-effective and easily implemented techniques in daily practice, allowing quality assessment of the dynamic anatomy of sleep-disordered breathing: cephalometry, (sleep-)endoscopy and acoustic reflectometry of the upper airway. [less ▲]

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See detailSignification évolutive du sommeil
Poirrier, Robert ULg; MARTIN, Didier ULg

Scientific conference (2012, October 10)

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See detailObservance au traitement par CPAP chez les patients souffrant d’apnées du sommeil
DEFLANDRE, Eric; DEGEY, Stéphanie; BONHOMME, Vincent ULg et al

Poster (2012, September 20)

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See detailMandible Behavior in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Patients Under CPAP Treatment
Senny, Frédéric ULg; Maury, Gisèle; CAMBRON, Laurent ULg et al

in Open Sleep Journal (2012), 5

Aim: To investigate whether obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients present different behaviors of mandible movements before and under CPAP therapy. Materials and Methodology: In this retrospective study ... [more ▼]

Aim: To investigate whether obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients present different behaviors of mandible movements before and under CPAP therapy. Materials and Methodology: In this retrospective study, patients were selected according to inclusion criteria: both the diagnostic polysomnography recording showing an OSA with an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) greater than 25 (n/h) and the related CPAP therapy control recordings were available, presence of mandible movement and mask pressure signals in the recordings, and tolerance to the applied positive pressure. Statistical analysis on four parameters, namely the apneahypopnea index (AHI), the arousal index (ArI), the average of the mandible lowering during sleep (aLOW), and the average amplitude of the oscillations of the mandible movement signal (aAMPL), was performed on two sets of recordings: OSA and CPAP therapy. Results: Thirty-four patients satisfied the inclusion criteria, thus both OSA and CPAP groups included thirty-four recordings each. Significant difference (p < 0.001) was found in the OSA group compared with the CPAP group when considering either the four parameters or only the two ones related to mandible movements. Conclusions: When an efficient CPAP pressure is applied, the mouth is less open and presents fewer broad sharp closure movements, and oscillating mandible movements are absent or very small. [less ▲]

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See detailContribution of postero-anterior cephalometry in obstructive sleep apnea.
POIRRIER, Anne-Lise ULg; Pire, Sylvie; Raskin, Sylviane et al

in The Laryngoscope (2012), 122(10), 2350-4

OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: Lateral cephalometry has been widely used to characterize facial and maxillary morphology in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients. It is a useful tool to assess orthodontic and ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: Lateral cephalometry has been widely used to characterize facial and maxillary morphology in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients. It is a useful tool to assess orthodontic and maxillofacial procedures, but transverse dimensions of the airway (e.g., nasal framework) have not been well described yet by cephalometry. We explored whether postero-anterior cephalometry could refine the analysis of the facial morphology, with a special attention paid to nasal morphology. We validated cephalometric measurements relevant to the diagnosis of OSA. STUDY DESIGN: Controlled study. METHODS: We explored postero-anterior and lateral cephalometric bony structures in OSA patients and in control subjects to determine which were predictive of an association with OSA. Healthy volunteers paired for age and sex to OSA patients underwent polysomnography and cephalometry. Data were analyzed by Shapiro-Wilk, Fisher, Wilcoxon, and paired t tests where appropriate. RESULTS: Nasal fossae and maxillary bone proportions were positively and independently associated with the absence of OSA. Measurements of maxillary width, nasal fossae angle, and anterior skull base contributed to the characterization of OSA patients. CONCLUSIONS: Postero-anterior cephalometry is an easy, rapid, informative, and reliable technique, which is complementary to the lateral cephalometry in the assessment of OSA patients. Our study may also suggest the negative impact of the nasal resistance on the upper airway resistance in sleep disorders. [less ▲]

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See detailAcromégalie et apnées du sommeil : évaluations céphalométriques
BRUWIER, Annick ULg; Albert, Adelin ULg; Beckers, Albert ULg et al

in Annales d'Endocrinologie (2011)

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See detailMidsagittal Jaw Movements as a Sleep/Wake Marker
Senny, Frédéric ULg; Destiné, Jacques ULg; Poirrier, Robert ULg

in IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering (2009), 56(2), 303-309

The seriousness of the obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome is measured by the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), the number of sleep apneas and hypopneas over the total sleep time (TST). Cardiorespiratory ... [more ▼]

The seriousness of the obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome is measured by the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), the number of sleep apneas and hypopneas over the total sleep time (TST). Cardiorespiratory signals are used to detect respiratory events while the TST is usually assessed by the analysis of electroencephalogram traces in polysomnography (PSG) or wrist actigraphy trace in portable monitoring. This paper presents a sleep/wake automatic detector that relies on a wavelet-based complexity measure of the midsagittal jaw movement signal and multilayer perceptrons. In all, 63 recordings were used to train and test the method, while 38 recordings constituted an independent evaluation set for which the sensitivity, the specificity, and the global agreement of sleep recognition, respectively, reached 85.1%, 76.4%, and 82.9%, compared with the PSG data. The AHI computed automatically and only from the jaw movement analysis was significantly improved (p < 0.0001 ) when considering this sleep/wake detector. Moreover, a sensitivity of 88.6% and a specificity of 83.6% were found for the diagnosis of the sleep apnea syndrome according to a threshold of 15. Thus, the jaw movement signal is reasonably accurate in separating sleep from wake, and, in addition to its ability to score respiratory events, is a valuable signal for portable monitoring. [less ▲]

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See detailMidsagittal Jaw Movement Analysis for the Scoring of Sleep Apneas and Hypopneas
Senny, Frédéric ULg; Destiné, Jacques ULg; Poirrier, Robert ULg

in IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering (2008), 55(1), 87-95

Given the importance of the detection and classification of sleep apneas and hypopneas (SAHs) in the diagnosis and the characterization of the SAH syndrome, there is a need for a reliable noninvasive ... [more ▼]

Given the importance of the detection and classification of sleep apneas and hypopneas (SAHs) in the diagnosis and the characterization of the SAH syndrome, there is a need for a reliable noninvasive technique measuring respiratory effort. This paper proposes a new method for the scoring of SAHs based on the recording of the midsagittal jaw motion (MJM, mouth opening) and on a dedicated automatic analysis of this signal. Continuous wavelet transform is used to quantize respiratory effort from the jaw motion, to detect salient mandibular movements related to SAHs and to delineate events which are likely to contain the respiratory events. The classification of the delimited events is performed using multilayer perceptrons which were trained and tested on sleep data from 34 recordings. Compared with SAHs scored manually by an expert, the sensitivity and specificity of the detection were 86.1% and 87.4%, respectively. Moreover, the overall classification agreement in the recognition of obstructive, central, and mixed respiratory events between the manual and automatic scorings was 73.1%. The MJM signal is hence a reliable marker of respiratory effort and allows an accurate detection and classification of SAHs. [less ▲]

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See detailTherapeutic armamentarium in neurology: the birth of a new era
Belachew, Shibeshih ULg; Magis, Delphine ULg; Lievens, Isabelle ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2007), 62(5-6), 432-448

The field of neurology was long infamous for a lack of therapeutic options. How many of you have once thought: "Neurologists don't cure the disease, they admire it". But those days have passed into ... [more ▼]

The field of neurology was long infamous for a lack of therapeutic options. How many of you have once thought: "Neurologists don't cure the disease, they admire it". But those days have passed into history, and the field is now vibrant with new treatments and hope even for patients with the worst neurodegenerative diseases. We summarized in the present review the latest major advances in therapeutic principles and practice for some of the most frequent chronic neurological disorders such as headaches, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, dementias, Parkinson's disease, sleep/wake disturbances and peripheral neuropathies. We cannot cure or prevent, but we can now halt or control symptoms and disease progression to provide physical and psychological relief, and a better quality of life for patients who suffer from these otherwise devastating neurological conditions. [less ▲]

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See detailSCREENING OF SLEEP APNEAS AND HYPOPNEAS THROUGH THE AUTOMATIC ANALYSIS OF MIDSAGITTAL JAW MOTION
Senny, Frédéric ULg; Destiné, Jacques ULg; POIRRIER, Robert ULg

Poster (2006, December 07)

This paper proposes a novel method for the scoring of sleep apneas and hypopneas (SAHs) based on the recording and the analysis of the midsagittal jaw movements. Continuous wavelet transform was used to ... [more ▼]

This paper proposes a novel method for the scoring of sleep apneas and hypopneas (SAHs) based on the recording and the analysis of the midsagittal jaw movements. Continuous wavelet transform was used to delineate events which were likely to contain the SAHs, while hidden markov models (HMMs) classified events. Considering 28 recordings from which awakenings were discarded, the method detected SAHs with a sensitivity and a specificity of 82.2% and 78.3% respectively. Obstructive, central and mixed respiratory events were distinguished fairly accurately. The jaw motion is hence a reliable marker of respiratory efforts and may suffice by itself to score SAHs. [less ▲]

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See detailDiagnostique du syndrome d’apnées et hypopnées obstructives du sommeil par l’analyse des mouvements de la mandibule
Senny, Frédéric ULg; Destiné, Jacques ULg; Ansay, Pierre et al

Conference (2005, November)

Les mouvements de la mandibule donnent une image des efforts respiratoires, particulièrement en période d’apnées et d’hypopnées du sommeil. Ils sont donc une alternative à la pression oesophagienne. Cette ... [more ▼]

Les mouvements de la mandibule donnent une image des efforts respiratoires, particulièrement en période d’apnées et d’hypopnées du sommeil. Ils sont donc une alternative à la pression oesophagienne. Cette étude a mis en évidence le potentiel d’une analyse automatique des mouvements de la mâchoire pour le diagnostique du syndrome d’apnées et hypopnées obstructives du sommeil (SAHOS) par la mesure de l’indice d’apnées et d’hypopnées (IAH). [less ▲]

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See detailDiagnosis of obstructive sleep apnoea and hypopnoea syndrome based on automatic analysis of mandibular movements
Senny, Frédéric ULg; Destiné, Jacques ULg; Ansay, Pierre et al

in Proceedings of the 1st WASM Congress (2005, October)

Our study showed the potential of a surrogate of the oesophageal pressure, the jaw motion, and a dedicated automatic analysis to diagnose the obstructive sleep apnoea and hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS ... [more ▼]

Our study showed the potential of a surrogate of the oesophageal pressure, the jaw motion, and a dedicated automatic analysis to diagnose the obstructive sleep apnoea and hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS). Twentyfour patients were recorded in hospital settings and the jaw motion of fifteen of them was also recorded at home with an ambulatory device. The apnoea and hypopnoea index (AHI) of the gold standard, AHI_PSG, and the two AHI from the automatic analysis of the jaw motion, AHI_H (hospital) and AHI_A (ambulatory), were compared : AHI_PSG Vs AHI_H showed good correlation (r = 0.97) and under-estimation (slope p = 0.76). AHI_A Vs AHI_H revealed good reliability with r = 0.98 and slope p = 0.99. Finally, AHI_PSG Vs AHI_A showed very good accuracy of the diagnosis with sensitivity of 90% and specificity of 100%. [less ▲]

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See detailAutomatic Scoring of sleep apnea and hypopnea by analysis of mandibular movements
Senny, Frédéric ULg; Destiné, Jacques ULg; Verly, Jacques ULg et al

in M.H.Hamza (Ed.) Proceedings of the 3rd International IASTED International conference on Biomedical Engineering (2005, February)

In this paper, we propose a method for sleep apnea and hypopnea detection by analyzing the mandibular movements recorded during sleep. This signal, highly correlated with the esophageal pressure during ... [more ▼]

In this paper, we propose a method for sleep apnea and hypopnea detection by analyzing the mandibular movements recorded during sleep. This signal, highly correlated with the esophageal pressure during apnea or hypopnea, is a good marker of respiratory efforts. The respiratory efforts and their background activity are used to detect salient mandibular movements related to sleep apnea and hypopnea, to delineate and to recognize episodes of sleep apnea and hypopnea. The method presented may be extended to others breathing disorders such as Respiratory Efforts Related Arousals (RERA). [less ▲]

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See detailNonvisual responses to light exposure in the human brain during the circadian night
Perrin, Fabien; Peigneux, Philippe ULg; Fuchs, Sonia ULg et al

in Current Biology (2004), 14(20), 1842-6

The brain processes light information to visually represent the environment but also to detect changes in ambient light level. The latter information induces non-image-forming responses and exerts ... [more ▼]

The brain processes light information to visually represent the environment but also to detect changes in ambient light level. The latter information induces non-image-forming responses and exerts powerful effects on physiology such as synchronization of the circadian clock and suppression of melatonin. In rodents, irradiance information is transduced from a discrete subset of photosensitive retinal ganglion cells via the retinohypothalamic tract to various hypothalamic and brainstem regulatory structures including the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei, the master circadian pacemaker. In humans, light also acutely modulates alertness, but the cerebral correlates of this effect are unknown. We assessed regional cerebral blood flow in 13 subjects attending to auditory and visual stimuli in near darkness following light exposures (>8000 lux) of different durations (0.5, 17, 16.5, and 0 min) during the biological night. The bright broadband polychromatic light suppressed melatonin and enhanced alertness. Functional imaging revealed that a large-scale occipito-parietal attention network, including the right intraparietal sulcus, was more active in proportion to the duration of light exposures preceding the scans. Activity in the hypothalamus decreased in proportion to previous illumination. These findings have important implications for understanding the effects of light on human behavior. [less ▲]

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See detailCerebral Glucose Utilization During Stage 2 Sleep in Man
Maquet, Pierre ULg; Dive, Dominique ULg; Salmon, Eric ULg et al

in Brain Research (1992), 571(1), 149-53

Using [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose method and positron emission tomography, we performed paired determinations of the cerebral glucose utilization at one week intervals during sleep and wakefulness, in 12 ... [more ▼]

Using [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose method and positron emission tomography, we performed paired determinations of the cerebral glucose utilization at one week intervals during sleep and wakefulness, in 12 young normal subjects. During 6 of 28 sleep runs, a stable stage 2 SWS was observed that fulfilled the steady-state conditions of the model. The cerebral glucose utilization during stage 2 SWS was lower than during wakefulness, but the variation did not significantly differ from zero (mean variation: -11.5 +/- 25.57%, P = 0.28). The analysis of 89 regions of interest showed that glucose metabolism differed significantly from that observed at wake in 6 brain regions, among them both thalamic nuclei. We conclude that the brain energy metabolism is not homogeneous throughout all the stages of non-REMS but decreases from stage 2 SWS to deep SWS; we suggest that a low thalamic glucose metabolism is a metabolic feature common to both stage 2 and deep SWS, reflecting the inhibitory processes observed in the thalamus during these stages of sleep. Stage 2 SWS might protect the stability of sleep by insulating the subject from the environment and might be a prerequisite to the full development of other phases of sleep, especially deep SWS. [less ▲]

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