References of "Péters, Fabrice"
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See detailReversal of acepromazine-induced hemodynamic alterations by norepinephrine in standing horses
pequito, Manuel; Amory, Hélène ULg; Peters, Fabrice et al

Poster (2011, March 18)

Acepromazine (ACP) is a phenothiazine commonly used to sedate horses. Additionally, ACP exerts strong anti-inflammatory effects, which might have a therapeutic potential in horses suffering from systemic ... [more ▼]

Acepromazine (ACP) is a phenothiazine commonly used to sedate horses. Additionally, ACP exerts strong anti-inflammatory effects, which might have a therapeutic potential in horses suffering from systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). However, the ACP-induced vasodilation precludes its use in horses with SIRS-related cardiovascular compromise. The objective of this study was to test if the hemodynamic effects of the administration of 0,1 mg/kg of ACP could be counteracted by an intravenous infusion of norepinephrine (NOR) at 1ug/kg/min in healthy horses. In 5 healthy adult horses, a 15 minutes NOR IV infusion was administered 45 minutes after an injection of 0,1 mg/kg of ACP IV. The systolic arterial blood pressure (SAP) was non-invasively measured by Doppler sphingometry at the tail. Hemodynamics of the median artery of the left forelimb were studied using Doppler ultrasonography, through calculation of the vessel’s surface (SURF), diameter (DIAM), circumference (CIRC), and peak systolic velocity (PSV), end diastolic velocity (EDV), mean velocity (MV), volumetric flow (VF) and resistivity index (RI) of the flow. Both SAP and Doppler parameters were determined at regular intervals during the entire study. ACP induced a hypotension and a vasodilatation, that were evidenced by a significant rise of the SURF, DIAM, CIRC, PSV, EDV, MV and VF and reduction of the SAP and RI. During NOR infusion, all these ACP-induced hemodynamic changes were reversed. These findings suggest that a continuous IV NOR infusion at 1ug/kg/min is able to revert ACP-induced hypotension and vasodilation in healthy adult horses. [less ▲]

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See detailIn vivo administration of acepromazine or promethazine to horse decreases the reactive oxygen species production response of subsequently isolated neutrophils to stimulation with phorbol myristate acetate
Péters, Fabrice; Franck, Thierry ULg; Pequito, Manuel et al

in Journal of Veterinary Pharmacology & Therapeutics (2009)

The previous experiments have shown that some phenothiazines have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties in vitro. In this study the inhibition of the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by ... [more ▼]

The previous experiments have shown that some phenothiazines have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties in vitro. In this study the inhibition of the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by neutrophils was studied in two groups of horses, which received a dose of 0.1 mg⁄ kg of either acepromazine or promethazine intravenously. Blood samples were collected before (T0) and 0.5, 1, 3 and 5 h after drug administration. The chemiluminescence (CML) response of neutrophils was measured ex vivo in the presence of luminol for a period of 10 min and the maximum CML value (peak value) recorded. There was a significant inhibition of the ROS production in the acepromazine treated group (49% inhibition) at 5 h after administration and in the promethazine group (24% inhibition) at 3 h after administration (P < 0.05 vs. T0). These findings are of therapeutic relevance in the use of phenothiazines in equine patients with inflammatory diseases where neutrophil activation and ROS production are implicated. [less ▲]

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See detailMyeloperoxidase Assay in Plasma and Peritoneal Fluid of Horses with Gastrointestinal Disease
Grulke, Sigrid ULg; Franck, Thierry ULg; Gangl, Monika et al

in Canadian Journal of Veterinary Research = Revue Canadienne de Recherche Vétérinaire (2008), 72(1), 37-42

Gastrointestinal disorders, especially strangulating intestinal obstructions, are still a major cause of illness and death in the horse. Circulating lipopolysaccharides may activate both neutrophils and ... [more ▼]

Gastrointestinal disorders, especially strangulating intestinal obstructions, are still a major cause of illness and death in the horse. Circulating lipopolysaccharides may activate both neutrophils and monocytes. The activated neutrophils release myeloperoxidase (MPO), a specific enzyme with strong oxidative activity. The aim of this study was to evaluate MPO concentrations in the plasma and peritoneal fluid (PF) of horses with colic and to check the hypothesis that these concentrations would be higher in a case of strangulating obstruction than in cases of nonstrangulating disease. By using a specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for equine MPO, we determined the MPO concentrations in horses admitted to a clinic for colic. Horses with nonstrangulating or strangulating obstruction of the large intestine (NSLI or SLI), strangulating obstruction of the small intestine (SSI), or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) were compared with healthy horses. The horses with SLI, SSI, or IBD had significantly higher MPO levels in plasma and PF than did those in the other 2 groups. The mean plasma level was significantly higher in the horses with NSLI than in the healthy horses. High MPO values in PF indicated necrotic bowel. These results show that neutrophil activation occurs during nonstrangulating and strangulating intestinal obstruction in horses and that the plasma and PF MPO concentrations may be a marker of the severity of the disease. [less ▲]

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See detailInhibitory effect of curcuminoids and tetrahydrocurcuminoids on equine activated neutrophils and myeloperoxidase activity
Franck, Thierry ULg; Kohnen, Stephan ULg; Grulke, Sigrid ULg et al

in Physiological Research (2008), 57(4), 577-587

In the horse, the inflammation response to various pathologies (intestinal strangulations, laminitis, etc.) involves an excessive stimulation of the polymorphonuclear neutrophils releasing reactive oxygen ... [more ▼]

In the horse, the inflammation response to various pathologies (intestinal strangulations, laminitis, etc.) involves an excessive stimulation of the polymorphonuclear neutrophils releasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and myeloperoxidase (MPO). The aim of the present work was to study the effect of natural polyphenols, curcuminoids and tetrahydrocurcuminoids (THC) on isolated stimulated equine neutrophils and on the activity of purified MPO. The ROS production and the release of MPO by activated neutrophils were measured by chemiluminescence and ELISA techniques, respectively. The activity of purified MPO was measured by studying its nitration, chlorination or oxidation capacity and by using an original method called SIEFED allowing the study of drug interaction with the enzyme without interferences of the medium. Curcuminoids and THC had dose-dependent inhibitory effects on ROS production and MPO release by activated neutrophils and on purified MPO activity. We suggest that the higher efficacy of curcuminoids versus THC could be explained, at least partially, by its chemical structure: the conjugated double bounds and the plane structure of curcuminoids made easier the neutralization of the radical species generated by activated neutrophils and the interaction of the drug with the active site of MPO. These inhibitory effects of curcuminoids on the oxidant activity of equine neutrophils and on MPO activity open therapeutic perspectives in equine pathologies with excessive inflammatory reactions. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of Unfractionated and Fractionated Heparins on Myeloperoxidase Activity and Interactions with Endothelial Cells: Possible Effects on the Pathophysiology of Equine Laminitis
de la Rebière de Pouyade, Geoffroy ULg; Franck, Thierry ULg; Dupont, Ginette ULg et al

in Veterinary Journal (2007), 178(1), 62-69

As heparins are sometimes used to prevent equine laminitis, the interactions between equine neutrophil myeloperoxidase (MPO), unfractionated (UFH) and fractionated low molecular weight (LMWH) heparins and ... [more ▼]

As heparins are sometimes used to prevent equine laminitis, the interactions between equine neutrophil myeloperoxidase (MPO), unfractionated (UFH) and fractionated low molecular weight (LMWH) heparins and digital endothelium have been investigated. The effects of the heparins on purified equine MPO activity were tested by immunocapture followed by enzymatic detection. Endothelium-MPO interactions were assessed by measuring total and active MPO uptake by arterial and venous digital endothelial cells in culture with or without the addition of heparins. A dose-dependent MPO inhibition by UFH and LMWH was seen, with the greatest reduction in MPO activity noted with the highest concentration of LMWH. The MPO capture was greater in arterial cells, but heparins better inhibited MPO capture in venous cells. The activity of cell-bound MPO was almost completely suppressed by the heparins, and no differences were observed between UFH and LMWH. The results confirm the anti-inflammatory properties of heparins and allow a better understanding of the potential role of MPO in laminitis. [less ▲]

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See detailA type II-collagen derived peptide and its nitrated form as new markers of inflammation and cartilage degradation in equine osteochondral lesions.
Gangl, Monika; Deberg, Michelle ULg; Lejeune, Jean-Philippe ULg et al

in Research in Veterinary Science (2007), 82

Markers of cartilage breakdown enable studying the degradation of cartilage matrix in equine joint pathologies. This study was designed to determine the levels of Coll2-1, a peptide of the triple helix of ... [more ▼]

Markers of cartilage breakdown enable studying the degradation of cartilage matrix in equine joint pathologies. This study was designed to determine the levels of Coll2-1, a peptide of the triple helix of type II collagen, and Coll2-1NO(2), its nitrated form in the plasma of healthy horses (controls; n=37) and horses suffering from osteochondrosis (n=34). Clinical and arthroscopic scores were attributed reflecting the severity of lesions and were related to the plasma levels of Coll2-1 and Coll2-1NO(2). The median of Coll2-1 was significantly higher in the control group, whereas the mean of Coll2-1NO(2) showed significant elevation in the pathological group. However, the measurement means of scoring classes did not vary significantly. The markers were able to differentiate the group of horses suffering from osteochondrosis from the group of healthy horses. The elevation of Coll2-1NO(2) in the pathological group indicates an inflammation, mediated through reactive oxygen species and/or increased myeloperoxidase activity. [less ▲]

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See detailA non-traumatic case of intracranial haemorrhage in a horse
Verwilghen, Denis ULg; Van Galen, Gaby ULg; Peters, Fabrice et al

Poster (2006, August)

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See detailGastrointestinal prokinetics'efficiency and risk factors of development of postoperative ileus: clinical study.
Salciccia, Alexandra ULg; Péters, Fabrice; Gangl, Monika et al

Conference (2006, June 29)

Because of the lack of clinical data in the area, this clinical study was performed to evaluate gastrointestinal prokinetics’ efficiency. Material used includes 2 groups composed each one by 25 horses ... [more ▼]

Because of the lack of clinical data in the area, this clinical study was performed to evaluate gastrointestinal prokinetics’ efficiency. Material used includes 2 groups composed each one by 25 horses which underwent surgery for small intestinal lesions in the University of Liège between january 1997 and august 2005. The 2 groups were formed by a selection resulting in similar (or not significantly different) mean values for the age, gravity score, shock score, packed cell volume on admission in the clinic and length of resected intestine when an enterectomy was performed. Between the 2 groups, we searched also equal (or not significantly different) proportions of Belgian Warmblood, of females/males, of horses wich underwent an enterectomy, of horses which had a concomitant lesion of the large intestine and of horses wich needed 1 or more sedative α2 agonist drug during the postoperative period. One group was treated with gastrointestinal prokinetics (lidocaine, erythromycin, metoclopramide) systematically, whereas the other one not and the incidence and duration of postoperative ileus was evaluated. No significant difference in the incidence or the duration of postoperative ileus was found between the 2 groups. Because our results did not show any effect of prokinetics, a statistical analysis searched in these 50 horses the risk factors of postoperative ileus among the following parameters: breed, age, sex, gravity score, shock score, packed cell volume on admission in the clinic, protocol of induction of anaesthesia, duration of anaesthesia, performing an enterectomy and length of the resected intestine, concomitant lesion of the large intestine, and administration of sedative α2 agonists during the postoperative period. Only the Belgian warmblood breed and the administration of sedative α2 agonist drugs after the recovery from anaesthesia were significantly more important in the group where horses developed a postoperative ileus. Undoubdtedly, this study includes only 50 cases selected for the homogeneity of their parameters and not all the cases of small intestine surgery during the test period. In view of these results, it would be interesting performing this study again on a larger number of cases in a prospective manner. [less ▲]

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See detailPrognostic value of white blood cell drop in horses undergoing post-colic surgery intensive care.
Chiavaccini, Ludovica; Péters, Fabrice; Gangl, Monika et al

Conference (2006)

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See detailComment réaliser une immobilisation avec des support externes rigides ? Description de deux techniques
Gangl, Monika; Verwilghen, Denis ULg; Piccot-Crezollet, Cyrille et al

Poster (2006)

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See detailDevelopment of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for specific equine neutrophil myeloperoxidase measurement in blood
Franck, Thierry ULg; Grulke, Sigrid ULg; Deby-Dupont, Ginette et al

in Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation (2005), 17(5), 412-419

Equine inflammatory disease is accompanied by a neutrophil activation resulting in the release of granulocytic enzyme myeloperoxidase (MPO). To measure MPO in horse plasma as marker of neutrophil ... [more ▼]

Equine inflammatory disease is accompanied by a neutrophil activation resulting in the release of granulocytic enzyme myeloperoxidase (MPO). To measure MPO in horse plasma as marker of neutrophil activation, the authors purified equine neutrophil MPO and developed a specific enzyme immunoassay using 2 specific polyclonal antibodies obtained from rabbit (primary antibody) and guinea pig (secondary antibody). The sandwich complex "primary antibody-MPO-secondary antibody" was detected using a goat anti-guinea pig immunoglobulin antibody conjugated to alkaline phosphatase. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) showed good precision and accuracy, with intra- and interassay coefficients of variation below 10% for MPO concentrations ranging from 0.78 to 50 ng/ml. A stable plasma MPO value, unaffected by time elapsed between blood collection and centrifugation, was obtained with plasma from EDTA anticoagulated blood. The mean MPO value measured in 38 healthy horses was 181.80 +/- 64.74 ng/ml. In 20 horses suffering from obstruction of the large or small intestine, MPO concentrations measured at the time of arrival at the intensive care unit were significantly higher than mean normal value, ranging from 477.88 to 2,748.13 ng/ml. Work is in progress to apply this MPO ELISA technique to other biological fluids and other equine diseases. [less ▲]

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