References of "Périlleux, Claire"
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See detailMaize cold tolerance : in search of relevant parameters for discriminating genotypes
Riva-Roveda, Laetitia ULg; Escale, Brigitte; Giauffret, Catherine et al

Poster (2014, May 15)

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See detailThe effects of flowering signals on root architecture in Arabidopsis
Mathieu, Laura ULg; Lobet, Guillaume ULg; Périlleux, Claire ULg

Poster (2014, May 15)

Roots are responsible for water and nutrient uptake and hence are critical to sustain the whole plant life cycle. This study aims at characterizing how root development is affected by flowering. We ... [more ▼]

Roots are responsible for water and nutrient uptake and hence are critical to sustain the whole plant life cycle. This study aims at characterizing how root development is affected by flowering. We therefore focused on the effects of systemic signals produced in the leaves at floral transition, namely the proteins FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) and TWIN SISTER OF FT (TSF), on root growth and branching. These proteins act in the shoot apical meristem as potent promoters of flowering [1] but their effects in other parts of the plant are still unknown. [less ▲]

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See detailIdentifying root-secreted proteases in Arabidopsis thaliana: an Activity-Based Protein Profiling approach.
Lallemand, Jérôme ULg; Périlleux, Claire ULg; Tocquin, Pierre ULg

Poster (2014, May 15)

Proteases are involved in many physiological processes during the whole life of the plant, such as embryonic development, defense against pathogens, nutrition or mycorrhiza creation. However, the ... [more ▼]

Proteases are involved in many physiological processes during the whole life of the plant, such as embryonic development, defense against pathogens, nutrition or mycorrhiza creation. However, the functions of many of the 800 proteases of Arabidopsis thaliana still remain unknown. Besides discovering new functions, studying proteases can also result in improving plant biotechnology. Indeed, plants can be used as hosts for recombinant protein production. Some proteins of interest require to be secreted in order to fold properly, but production yields are limited due to their degradation by endogenous extracellular proteases. The aim of our study is to identify active root-secreted proteases of Arabidopsis thaliana. Their activity was first analyzed by in vitro incubation with a target protein (BSA) at different values of pH and in the presence of proteases inhibitors. This analysis identified serine proteases as the major protease class involved in BSA degradation. Then, an Activity-Based Protein Profiling approach led to the labeling of two active serine proteases in the root-secreted sample. Finally, a further step towards the identification by mass spectrometry, based on affinity purification, was developed. [less ▲]

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See detailFlowering Goes Underground
Bouché, Frédéric ULg; Lobet, Guillaume ULg; D'Aloia, Maria ULg et al

Conference (2014, May 15)

Flowering is a crucial step in plant life cycle and is therefore tightly controlled by both environmental and endogenous cues. The involvement of the aerial organs of the plant in the molecular mechanisms ... [more ▼]

Flowering is a crucial step in plant life cycle and is therefore tightly controlled by both environmental and endogenous cues. The involvement of the aerial organs of the plant in the molecular mechanisms controlling floral transition has been extensively documented while the participation of the roots remains poorly investigated. However, the induction of flowering by photoperiod involves systemic signals that move in the phloem from leaves to sinks, and hence presumably reach the roots. We therefore performed a transcriptomic analysis of the roots during the induction of flowering in Arabidopsis thaliana and indeed identified a large number of differentially expressed genes. A reverse genetic approach further confirmed the pleiotropic effects of flowering time genes on root architecture. [less ▲]

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See detailInflorescence development in tomato: gene functions within a zigzag model.
Périlleux, Claire ULg; Lobet, Guillaume ULg; Tocquin, Pierre ULg

in Frontiers in Plant Science (2014), 5

Tomato is a major crop plant and several mutants have been selected for breeding but also for isolating important genes that regulate flowering and sympodial growth. Besides, current research in ... [more ▼]

Tomato is a major crop plant and several mutants have been selected for breeding but also for isolating important genes that regulate flowering and sympodial growth. Besides, current research in developmental biology aims at revealing mechanisms that account for diversity in inflorescence architectures. We therefore found timely to review the current knowledge of the genetic control of flowering in tomato and to integrate the emerging network into modeling attempts. We developped a kinetic model of the tomato inflorescence development where each meristem was represented by its ‘vegetativeness’ (V), reflecting its maturation state towards flower initiation. The model followed simple rules: maturation proceeded continuously at the same rate in every meristem (dV); floral transition and floral commitment occurred at threshold levels of V; lateral meristems were initiated with a gain of V (ΔV) relative to the V level of the meristem from which they derived. This last rule created a link between successive meristems and gave to the model its zigzag shape. We next exploited the model to explore the diversity of morphotypes that could be generated by varying dV and ΔV and matched them with existing mutant phenotypes. This approach, focused on the development of the primary inflorescence, allowed us to elaborate on the genetic regulation of the kinetic model of inflorescence development. We propose that the lateral inflorescence meristem fate in tomato is closer to an immature flower meristem than to the inflorescence meristem of Arabidopsis. In the last part of our paper, we extend our thought to spatial regulators that should be integrated in a next step for unraveling the relationships between the different meristems that participate to sympodial growth. [less ▲]

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See detailThe effects of flowering on root development in Arabidopsis
Mathieu, Laura ULg; Lobet, Guillaume ULg; Périlleux, Claire ULg

Poster (2013, July 05)

Flowering in Arabidopsis thaliana is controlled by photoperiod. In long days, the mobile proteins FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) and TWIN SISTER OF FT (TSF) are produced in the leaves and transported in the ... [more ▼]

Flowering in Arabidopsis thaliana is controlled by photoperiod. In long days, the mobile proteins FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) and TWIN SISTER OF FT (TSF) are produced in the leaves and transported in the phloem toward the shoot apical meristem (SAM). In the SAM, FT and TSF interact with the transcription factor FD to activate the expression of genes responsible for floral meristem identity [1]. Since the formation of flowers and fruits is a costly and critical stage for the plant, it is expected to be supported by a well developed root system to insure the increase in plant’s needs. As a first step to understand the effects of flowering on root growth, we compared root development in long days, promoting flowering, and in short days (16h and 8h days, respectively). [less ▲]

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See detailThe hidden half of flowering
Bouché, Frédéric ULg; Mistiaen, Kevin ULg; D'Aloia, Maria ULg et al

Poster (2013, June)

Flowering is one of the most important developmental steps in plant life cycle and is therefore tightly controlled by environmental cues. The involvement of the aerial part of the plant in the molecular ... [more ▼]

Flowering is one of the most important developmental steps in plant life cycle and is therefore tightly controlled by environmental cues. The involvement of the aerial part of the plant in the molecular mechanisms leading to floral transition is well documented while participation of the roots received less attention. Nevertheless, the induction of flowering by photoperiod is known to involve systemic signals that move in phloem sap towards sinks, throughout the plants, including the roots. Transcriptomic analysis of roots tissues during the floral induction of flowering by a single long day of in Arabidopsis thaliana by a single long day allowed us to identify a large number of differentially expressed genes. How mutations We subsequently selected in some candidate genes affect plant development - including root architecture and flowering time - is being to analyze their flowering timefurther analyzed. Further analysis of those genes will permit us to unravel their role in the flowering induction process. [less ▲]

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See detailTowards the improvement of a rhizosecretion-based recombinant protein production system: Developing protease-depleted lines of Arabidopsis thaliana.
Lallemand, Jérôme ULg; Désiron, Carole ULg; Périlleux, Claire ULg et al

Poster (2013, June)

Besides traditional production systems, such as bacteria, yeasts and mammal cells, plants can now be used to produce eukaryotic recombinant proteins. Their advantages as hosts for protein production ... [more ▼]

Besides traditional production systems, such as bacteria, yeasts and mammal cells, plants can now be used to produce eukaryotic recombinant proteins. Their advantages as hosts for protein production include correct post-translational modifications, low cost of maintenance and no risk of contamination by human pathogens. Targeting heterologous proteins to the extracellular space is required for the correct folding of complex proteins and makes harvesting and purification easier. However, the quantity and the quality of recombinant proteins have been proved to be reduced by the action of endogenous co-secreted proteases. In this study, we aimed at identifying active root-secreted (rhizosecreted) proteases in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Their activity was assayed by in vitro degradation of a target protein (Bovine Serum Albumine, BSA) in a range of pH. The protease classes involved in BSA degradation were evaluated by inhibitor-based assays that revealed serine proteases as the major class involved in this degradation in any tested conditions. As a first step towards identification, and subsequent silencing, of the most active members of this class, rhizosecreted proteases are being analyzed by the “Activity-Based Protein Profiling” approach. [less ▲]

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See detailTowards identification of active root-secreted proteases of Arabidopsis thaliana.
Lallemand, Jérôme ULg; Désiron, Carole ULg; Périlleux, Claire ULg et al

Poster (2013, April 18)

Besides traditional production systems, such as bacteria, yeasts and mammal cells, plants can now be used to produce eukaryotic recombinant proteins. Their advantages as hosts for proteins production ... [more ▼]

Besides traditional production systems, such as bacteria, yeasts and mammal cells, plants can now be used to produce eukaryotic recombinant proteins. Their advantages as hosts for proteins production include correct post-translational modifications, low cost of maintenance and no risk of contamination by human pathogens. Targeting heterologous proteins to the extracellular space is required for the correct folding of complex proteins and makes harvesting and purification easier. However, the quantity and the quality of recombinant proteins have been proved to be reduced by the action of endogenous co-secreted proteases. In this study, we characterized root-secreted proteases in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, at the activity and expression levels. Their activity was analyzed by in vitro degradation of a target protein (Bovine Serum Albumine, BSA) in a range of pH and in the presence of several proteases inhibitors. Serine proteases were identified as the major protease class involved in the degradation of BSA under all tested conditions. As a first step towards the identification of the key players, the expression level of selected members of this class was analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR in roots and leaves. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular analysis of root medium impact on Arabidopsis thaliana development
Bouché, Frédéric ULg; André, Julie; Tocquin, Pierre ULg et al

Poster (2013, April 18)

Hydroponics and soil are the most common media used for plant growth. Hydroponics has the main advantage of providing easy access to the root system and is therefore commonly used for gene expression ... [more ▼]

Hydroponics and soil are the most common media used for plant growth. Hydroponics has the main advantage of providing easy access to the root system and is therefore commonly used for gene expression analyses in molecular studies of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. However, the impact of root substrate on plant growth remains poorly documented. Here we show that hydroponics accelerates both shoot growth and developmental phases as compared with culture on soil. In order to identify molecular changes in the roots that could account for these medium effects, a transcriptomic comparison was performed by microarray analysis. This experiment revealed that more than 20% of the genes were differentially expressed in hydroponics vs soil. Among them, the flowering time gene FLOWERING LOCUS C and two clades of microRNA targeted genes. To further assess the role of these genes in roots, artificial microRNAs were designed for root specific expression in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. [less ▲]

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See detailImplication of microRNAs in the response of Brachypodium distachyon (L.) Beauv. root system architecture to rhizobacterial volatiles
Baudson, Caroline ULg; Bouché, Frédéric ULg; Saunier de Cazenave, Magdalena ULg et al

Scientific conference (2013, February)

The metabolic roles of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) and the identity of the molecules responsible for the growth promotion are still poorly ... [more ▼]

The metabolic roles of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) and the identity of the molecules responsible for the growth promotion are still poorly documented. As well, the implication of microRNAs in root development is a recent discovery that deserves to be explored. In this study, the implication of microRNAs in the response of Brachypodium distachyon (L.) Beauv. Bd21 root architecture to rhizobacterial VOCs was investigated. Nineteen PGPR strains were screened to select those showing the strongest phenotypic effects. The strain Bacillus subtilis AP305-GB03 induced the most important promotion of biomass production and root development. Total RNA extraction and RT-qPCR analysis of microRNAs were performed on Bd21 root samples. The expression of miR160 a-d, miR164 f, miR167 c-d, miR397 b and miR399 a-b was measured in roots every 2 days during the first 10 days of Bd21 development, in the presence or absence of the bacterial VOCs. Differences in the expression profile of miR164 f and miR167 c-d were observed in the roots exposed to GB03 VOCs, as compared to the control. These differences could be correlated to the root system architecture modifications observed after 10 days of growth with GB03. miR397 b and miR399 a-b also showed differences in the expression profile of roots exposed to the bacterial VOCs. These microRNAs have been respectively involved in cold stress tolerance and in the response to phosphate starvation. [less ▲]

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See detailFLC activity is conserved between root chicory (Cichorium intybus) and Arabidopsis
Périlleux, Claire ULg

Scientific conference (2013, January 11)

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See detailAn online database for plant image analysis software tools
Lobet, Guillaume ULg; Draye, Xavier; Périlleux, Claire ULg

in Plant Methods (2013), 9(98),

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See detailA root chicory MADS-box sequence and the Arabidopsis flowering repressor FLC share common features that suggest conserved function in vernalization and devernalization responses
Périlleux, Claire ULg; Pieltain, Alexandra; Jacquemin, Guillaume et al

in Plant Journal (The) (2013), 75

Root chicory (Cichorium intybus var. sativum) is a biennial crop, but is harvested for root inulin at the end of the first growing season before flowering. However, cold temperatures might vernalize seeds ... [more ▼]

Root chicory (Cichorium intybus var. sativum) is a biennial crop, but is harvested for root inulin at the end of the first growing season before flowering. However, cold temperatures might vernalize seeds or plantlets, leading to incidental early flowering and hence understanding the molecular basis of vernalization is important. A MADS-box sequence was isolated by RT-PCR and named FLC-LIKE1 (CiFL1) because of its phylogenetic positioning within the same clade as the floral repressor Arabidopsis FLOWERING LOCUS C (AtFLC). Moreover, overexpression of CiFL1 in Arabidopsis caused late flowering and prevented up-regulation of the AtFLC target FLOWERING LOCUS T gene by photoperiod, suggesting functional conservation between root chicory and Arabidopsis. Like AtFLC in Arabidopsis, CiFL1 was repressed during vernalization of seeds or plantlets of chicory, but repression of CiFL1 was unstable whether the post-vernalization temperature was favorable to flowering or whether it devernalized the plants. Instability of CiFL1 repression might be linked to bienniality of root chicory versus the annual life cycle of Arabidopsis. However, reactivation of AtFLC was also observed in Arabidopsis when a high temperature treatment was given straight after seed vernalization, erasing the promotive effect of cold on flowering. Cold-induced downregulation of a MADS-box floral repressor and its reactivation by high temperature thus appear as conserved features of the vernalization and devernalization responses in distant species.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailHigh temperatures limit plant growth but hasten flowering in root chicory (Cichorium intybus) independently of vernalisation.
Mathieu, Anne-Sophie; Lutts, Stanley; Vandoorne, Bertrand et al

in Journal of Plant Physiology (2013), in press

An increase in mean and extreme summer temperatures is expected as a consequence of climate changes and this might have an impact on plant development in numerous species. Root chicory (Cichorium intybus ... [more ▼]

An increase in mean and extreme summer temperatures is expected as a consequence of climate changes and this might have an impact on plant development in numerous species. Root chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) is a major crop in northern Europe, and it is cultivated as a source of inulin. This polysaccharide is stored in the tap root during the first growing season when the plant grows as a leafy rosette, whereas bolting and flowering occur in the second year after winter vernalisation. The impact of heat stress on plant phenology, water status, photosynthesis-related parameters, and inulin content was studied in the field and under controlled phytotron conditions. In the field, plants of the Crescendo cultivar were cultivated under a closed plastic-panelled greenhouse to investigate heat-stress conditions, while the control plants were shielded with a similar, but open, structure. In the phytotrons, the Crescendo and Fredonia cultivars were exposed to high temperatures (35 °C day/ 28 °C night) and compared to control conditions (17 °C) over 10 weeks. In the field, heat reduced the root weight, the inulin content of the root and its degree of polymerisation in non-bolting plants. Flowering was observed in 12% of the heat stressed plants during the first growing season in the field. In the phytotron, the heat stress increased the total number of leaves per plant, but reduced the mean leaf area. Photosynthesis efficiency was increased in these plants, whereas osmotic potential was decreased. High temperature was also found to induce flowering of up to 50% of these plants, especially for the Fredonia cultivar. In conclusion, high temperatures induced a reduction in the growth of root chicory, although photosynthesis is not affected. Flowering was also induced, which indicates that high temperatures can partly substitute for the vernalisation requirement for the flowering of root chicory [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of cold temperatures on the early stages of maize inbreds
Riva-Roveda, Laetitia ULg; Escale, Brigitte; Giauffret, Catherine et al

Poster (2012, July)

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See detailComment les plantes fleurissent-elles ?
Périlleux, Claire ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2012)

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See detailRooting the flowering process
D'Aloia, Maria ULg; Bouché, Frédéric ULg; Tamseddak, Karim et al

Poster (2012, May)

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (7 ULg)