References of "Orlent, H"
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See detailHepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus infection in Belgium: similarities and differences in epidemic and initial management
De Vroey, B; Moreno, C; Laleman, W et al

in European Journal of Gastroenterology & Hepatology (2013), 25(5), 613-619

Introduction Nationwide studies comparing patients with hepatitis B and C virus (HBV and HCV) infections are mandatory for assessing changes in epidemiology. Aim The aim of this study was to compare ... [more ▼]

Introduction Nationwide studies comparing patients with hepatitis B and C virus (HBV and HCV) infections are mandatory for assessing changes in epidemiology. Aim The aim of this study was to compare epidemiological data and initial management of newly diagnosed patients with persistent HBV (HBsAg positive) or HCV (detectable HCV RNA) infection in Belgium. Patients and methods Data were extracted from two Belgian observational databases. Results A total of 655 patients (387 HBV and 268 HCV) were included. Compared with HCV patients, HBV patients were younger, more frequently men, more often of Asian or African origin (43 vs. 10%, P < 0.0001), and less frequently contaminated by transfusion or intravenous drug use (9 and 6% vs. 34 and 44%, P< 0.0001). Viral replication was assessed in 89% of HBV patients. Compared with HCV patients, HBV patients more frequently had normal alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels (65 vs. 29%, P < 0.0001), less frequently underwent liver biopsy (29 vs. 67%, P < 0.0001), and were less often considered for antiviral therapy (25 vs. 54%, P < 0.0001). When taking only HBV patients with detectable viral replication into consideration, results remained unchanged. During the multivariate analysis, ALT was a major factor for performing liver biopsy or considering antiviral therapy in both groups. Conclusion HBV and HCV screening policies should be targeted toward immigrants and intravenous drug users, respectively. Guidelines recommending systematic search for viral replication should be reinforced in HBV patients. HBV patients less frequently underwent liver biopsy and were less often considered for antiviral therapy compared with HCV patients. Despite the lack of sensitivity and specificity, ALT remains a pivotal decision-making tool for liver biopsy and antiviral therapy in both infections. [less ▲]

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See detailUpdate of the Belgian Association for the Study of the Liver Guidelines for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C genotype 1 with protease inhibitors.
Orlent, H; Deltenre, P; Francque, S et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2012), 75(2), 245-259

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See detailHBV infection in Belgium: results of the BASL observatory of 1456 HBsAg carriers.
Deltenre, P.; Laleman, W.; Van Gossum, M. et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2012), 75(1), 35-41

Introduction : Nationwide studies are mandatory to assess changes in the epidemiology of HBV infection in Europe. Aim : To describe epidemiological characteristics of HBsAgpositive patients, especially ... [more ▼]

Introduction : Nationwide studies are mandatory to assess changes in the epidemiology of HBV infection in Europe. Aim : To describe epidemiological characteristics of HBsAgpositive patients, especially inactive carriers, and to evaluate how practitioners manage HBV patients in real life. Methods : Belgian physicians were asked to report all chronically infected HBV patients during a one-year period. Results : Among 1,456 patients included, 1,035 (71%) were classified into one of four phases of chronic infection : immune tolerance (n = 10), HBeAg-positive hepatitis (n = 248), HBeAgnegative hepatitis (n = 420) and inactive carrier state (n = 357 HBeAg-negative patients with ALT < upper limit of normal (ULN) and HBV DNA < 2,000 IU/mL). Using less restrictive criteria for ALT (1-2 ULN) or HBV DNA (2,000-20,000 IU/mL), 93 unclassified patients were added to the group of inactive carriers. These 93 additional inactive carriers were younger, more frequently males, with similar risk factors for HBV infection and histological features compared to inactive carriers according to recent guidelines. Recent guidelines on management of HBV patients were generally followed, but systematic HBV DNA measurements and HDV coinfection screening should be reinforced. Conclusion : In Belgium, an inactive carrier state was a common form of chronic HBV infection. Using less restrictive criteria for classification of inactive carriers did not modify their main characteristics and seemed better adapted to clinical practice. Recent guidelines on management of HBV patients should be reinforced. [less ▲]

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See detailAre patients with HBV and HCV infection different? Comparison between 2 cohorts of newly diagnosed cases included in prospective registries of the Belgian Association for the Study of the Liver
De Vroey, B.; Moreno, C.; Laleman, W. et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2011, March), 74(1), 21

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See detailDiscussion on the risk of surgery in patients with cirrhosis
Colle, I.; Orlent, H.; Delwaide, Jean ULg

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2008), 71(1), 47

Several reasons result in the finding that patients with cirrhosis need surgery more often than other patients groups. Patients with cirrhosis frequently have comorbidities resulting in gastrointestinal ... [more ▼]

Several reasons result in the finding that patients with cirrhosis need surgery more often than other patients groups. Patients with cirrhosis frequently have comorbidities resulting in gastrointestinal, lung or cervical cancer, among others. Independent of cirrhosis, surgical resection may be the best alternative for a number of those malignancies. Comorbidities may also result in an increased incidence of vascular complications (such as lower extremity atherosclerosis and coronary stenosis) sorne of them being potential indications for surgery, Patients with alcohofic cirrhosis are more frequently subjected to trauma and bone fractures. Ascites leads to umbilical hernia which can be strangulated or ruptured. Emergency surgery may be needed in this context. Finally, a significant proportion of patients with cirrhosis develop hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) during the course of the disease. Surgical resection remains a first line option for HCC. While reliable guidefines have been proposed for surgical resection of HCC and liver transplantation, no precise guidelines are available for other aspects of surgical management during cirrhosis. Specific surgical procedures such as hepatectomy and transplantation are concentrated in highly speciafised centres, where detailed evaluation is relatively easy to obtain. In contrast, more general surgical procedures, either abdominal or non abdominal, are performed in various centres, making it more difficult to obtain detailed evaluation and draw recommendations. General surveys are still needed to precisely assess the risk of non-specifie surgery in patients with cirrhosis, to identify risk factors and to propose reliable guidelines. [less ▲]

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See detailManagement and treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus: Belgian Association for the Study of the Liver (BASL) 2007 guidelines
Colle, I.; Adler, M.; Brenard, R. et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2007), 70(4), 389-420

1. Introduction Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection currently affects about 400 million people and is responsible for 500,000 to 1,000,000 deaths annually worldwide from cirrhosis and hepatocellular ... [more ▼]

1. Introduction Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection currently affects about 400 million people and is responsible for 500,000 to 1,000,000 deaths annually worldwide from cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) (1). For this reason, screening high risk populations to identify HBV infected persons is important so that guidelines for treatment and prevention of transmission can be given in this specific group. Recently, new drugs became available for HBV and new insights in resistance and definitions came up. So, the purpose of this paper is providing an update of the recent literature and guidelines concerning 1. screening for chronic hepatitis B (CHB) 2. management of patients with CHB 3. treatment of CHB in mono-infected patients and in special patient populations (co-infected, transplanted and immunosuppressed patients). The recommendations are based onpublished information and the level of evidence is reported with each recommendation. The level of evidence is graded as :grade 1 : randomized controlled trials ; grade II-1 : controlled trials without randomization ; grade 11-2 : cohort or case-control analytic study ; grade 11-3 : multiple time series, dramatic uncontrolled experiments ; grade III : descriptive epidemiology, expert opinions. [less ▲]

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See detailThe management of patients with mild hepatitis C
Verslype, C.; Michielsen, P.; Adler, M. et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2005), 68(3), 314-318

Infection with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) represents an important public health problem and is a leading cause of chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Chronic hepatitis C is a ... [more ▼]

Infection with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) represents an important public health problem and is a leading cause of chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Chronic hepatitis C is a heterogeneous disease. Many patients have mild disease at presentation but not all of them will develop advanced liver disease. However, the identification of these patients with mild hepatitis C who will show progressive disease is difficult and is based on histological criteria and the assessment of co-factors (age, alcohol intake, steatosis). In addition, serum transaminases that are persistently normal on several occasions during 18 months may point to a more benign course. Patients with mild hepatitis C should not be excluded "a priori" from the possibility of being treated, as treatment with pegylated interferon and ribavirin is safe and effective in this group. Overall, the decision to initiate therapy should be individualized and based on the severity of the disease by liver biopsy, the potential of serious side effects, the probability of response and the motivation of the patient. [less ▲]

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