References of "Ongena, Marc"
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See detailImpact of different plant secondary metabolites addition: saponin, tannic acid, salicin and aloin on glucose anaerobic co-digestion
Mambanzulua Ngoma, Philippe; Hiligsmann, Serge ULg; Sumbu Zola, Eric et al

in Journal of Fermentation Technology (in press)

Vegetal waste and some wastewater of agro-food industries contain plant secondary metabolites (PSMs). It was showed in nutritional researches that these substances such as saponins and tannins reduced the ... [more ▼]

Vegetal waste and some wastewater of agro-food industries contain plant secondary metabolites (PSMs). It was showed in nutritional researches that these substances such as saponins and tannins reduced the methane production in the rumen. To our knowledge no study was done in the waste treatment domain to evaluate the inhibitory effect of the principal glycosidic metabolites from the wastewater or vegetal waste on their own methane-producing anaerobic digestion. Therefore in this paper BMP tests were carried out at 30°C with four commercial PSMs (CPSMs) in mixture with glucose monohydrate (Gl) used as control sample. These CPSMs were saponin from Quilaja Saponaria Molina Pract (Sap), tannic acid (Tan), salicin (Sal) and aloin from Curacao Aloe (Alo) representing respectively saponins, tannins, alcoholic glycosides and anthraquinones sources. Acidogenesis and acetogenesis were recorded for all the mixtures of Gl and CPSMs; however their conversion rates decreased with the increase of the concentrations of CPSMs. By contrast, the methanogenesis was inhibited at concentrations of CPSMs above 0.3 g/l. The inhibition degree for aromatic compounds on the anaerobic biodegradation of Gl seemed directly to depend on the numbers of benzene rings in the medium and the synergism. Thus, the highest inhibition of the biogas production from Gl was recorded for Alo, followed by Sap, Tan and Sal. However, the highest inhibition of the methane production from Gl was recorded with Sap, Alo, Tan and Sal. It was supposed that the toxicity potentials of these PSMs on the own biomethanization would be in following decreasing order: Sap or Alo, Tan and Sal. Therefore, the concentration of PSMs alone or in mixture in a digester should be bellow 0.3 g/l. for a better methanization . [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular patterns of rhizobacteria involved in plant immunity elicitation.
Mariutto, Martin ULg; Ongena, Marc ULg

in Advances in Botanical Research (in press)

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See detailChange in ATP-binding cassette B1/19, glutamine synthetase and alcohol dehydrogenase gene expression during root elongation in Betula pendula Roth and Alnus glutinosa L. Gaertn in response to leachate and leonardite humic substances
Tahiri, Abdelghani ULg; Delporte, Fabienne ULg; Muhovski, Yordan et al

in Plant Physiology & Biochemistry (2016), 98

Humic substances (HS) are complex and heterogeneous compounds of humified organic matter resulting from the chemical and microbiological decomposition of organic residues. HS have a positive effect on ... [more ▼]

Humic substances (HS) are complex and heterogeneous compounds of humified organic matter resulting from the chemical and microbiological decomposition of organic residues. HS have a positive effect on plant growth and development by improving soil structure and fertility. They have long been recognized as plant growth-promoting substances, particularly with regard to influencing nutrient uptake, root growth and architecture. The biochemical and molecular mechanisms through which HS influence plant physiology are not well understood. This study evaluated the bioactivity of landfill leachate and leonardite HS on alder (Alnus glutinosa L. Gaertn) and birch (Betula pendula Roth) during root elongation in vitro. Changes in root development were studied in relation to auxin, carbon and nitrogen metabolisms, as well as to the stress adaptive response. The cDNA fragments of putative genes encoding two ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters (ABCB1 and ABCB19) belonging to the B subfamily of plant ABC auxin transporters were cloned and sequenced. Molecular data indicate that HS and their humic acid (HA) fractions induce root growth by influencing polar auxin transport (PAT), as illustrated by the modulation of the ABCB transporter transcript levels (ABCB1 and ABCB19). There were also changes in alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and glutamine synthetase (GS) gene transcript levels in response to HS exposure. These findings confirmed that humic matter affects plant growth and development through various metabolic pathways, including hormonal, carbon and nitrogen metabolisms and stress response or signalization. [less ▲]

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See detailElicitor screening to protect wheat against Zymoseptoria tritici
Le Mire, Géraldine ULg; SIAH, ALI; Deleu, Magali ULg et al

Conference (2015, August 27)

Plants face an array of biotic and abiotic stresses in their environment, making it necessary to use various chemical inputs to maintain satisfactory yield. Today, conventional agriculture is evolving ... [more ▼]

Plants face an array of biotic and abiotic stresses in their environment, making it necessary to use various chemical inputs to maintain satisfactory yield. Today, conventional agriculture is evolving towards more sustainable practices, out of respect for human health and the environment. Elicitors are considered as promising biological control tools and draw major interest in IPM strategies. These plant-immunity triggering compounds, also called “stimulators of plant natural defenses”, induce a general and systemic resistance in the plant to various diseases. Although numerous elicitors have already been identified and some of them reached the market since the late 1970s, further investigations are still required to better understand the mode of action of these molecules in the plant and ensure a consistent efficiency under various field conditions. Few elicitors have yet been successfully tested and formulated to protect monocotyledonous crop plants such as wheat, which is cultivated over large areas in Europe. This study focuses on the screening of ten potential elicitor products of various origins and structures to protect winter wheat against the fungal pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici. Greenhouse trials were carried out to measure the ability of the different products to reduce disease foliar symptoms (necrosis, chlorosis and pycnidia). Topical spraying treatments with 3 different concentrations of each product were carried out 5 days before pathogen inoculation. Disease severity (% of symptoms on the total surface of the third leaf) was then scored every 2 days up to 28 days post-inoculation. In addition, phytotoxicity and biocide activity of these products was evaluated under greenhouse and laboratory conditions, respectively. The corresponding results will be presented and discussed with the perspective to choose the best elicitor candidates and to undertake investigations on the signaling pathway and the influence of environmental parameters on the elicitation capacity. [less ▲]

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See detailScreening for interesting elicitors to protect wheat against Zymoseptoria tritici
Le Mire, Géraldine ULg; Siah, Ali; Fauconnier, Marie-Laure ULg et al

Conference (2015, May 19)

Plants face an array of biotic and abiotic stresses in their environment, making it necessary to use various chemical inputs to maintain satisfactory yield. Today, conventional agriculture is evolving ... [more ▼]

Plants face an array of biotic and abiotic stresses in their environment, making it necessary to use various chemical inputs to maintain satisfactory yield. Today, conventional agriculture is evolving towards more sustainable practices, out of respect for human health and the environment. Elicitors are considered as promising biological control tools and draw major interest in IPM strategies. These plant-immunity triggering compounds, also called “stimulators of plant natural defenses”, induce a general and systemic resistance in the plant to various diseases. Although numerous elicitors have already been identified and some of them reached the market since the late 1970s, further investigations are still required to better understand the mode of action of these molecules in the plant and ensure a consistent efficiency under various field conditions. Few elicitors have yet been successfully tested and formulated to protect crop plants such as wheat, which is cultivated over large areas in Europe. This study focuses on the screening of ten potential elicitor products of various origins and structures to protect winter wheat against the fungal pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici. Greenhouse trials were carried out to measure the ability of the different products to reduce disease foliar symptoms (necrosis, chlorosis and pycnidia). In addition, the phytotoxicity and biocide activities of these products were evaluated under greenhouse and laboratory conditions, respectively. The corresponding results will be presented and discussed with the perspective to choose the best elicitor candidates and to undertake investigations on the signaling pathway and the influence of environmental parameters on the elicitation capacity. [less ▲]

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See detailSurfactin: a receptor-independent bacterial elicitor of plant immunity?
Luzuriaga Loaiza, Walter ULg; Legras, Aurelien; Crowet, Jean-Marc ULg et al

Poster (2015, May 13)

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See detailGrowth of desferrioxamine deficient Streptomyces mutants through xenosiderophore piracy of airborne fungal contaminations
Arguelles Arias, Anthony ULg; Lambert, Stephany; Martinet, Loïc et al

in FEMS Microbiology Ecology (2015)

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See detailCharacterization of Cichopeptins, New Phytotoxic Cyclic Lipodepsipeptides Produced by Pseudomonas cichorii SF1-54, and Their Role in Bacterial Midrib Rot Disease of Lettuce
Huang, CJ; Pauwelyn, E.; Ongena, Marc ULg et al

in Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions [=MPMI] (2015), 28(9), 109-1022

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See detailPlant polysaccharides initiate underground crosstalk with bacilli by inducing synthesis of the immunogenic lipopeptide surfactin
Debois, Delphine ULg; Fernandez, O.; Franzil, Laurent ULg et al

in Environmental Microbiology Reports (2015), 7(3), 570-582

Some plant-associated bacteria such as Bacillus sp. can protect their host from pathogen ingress and this biocontrol activity correlates with their potential to form multiple antibiotics upon in vitro ... [more ▼]

Some plant-associated bacteria such as Bacillus sp. can protect their host from pathogen ingress and this biocontrol activity correlates with their potential to form multiple antibiotics upon in vitro growth. However, our knowledge on antibiotic production by soil bacilli evolving on roots in natural conditions is still limited. In this work, antibiome imaging first revealed that the lipopeptide surfactin is the main bacterial ingredient produced in planta within the first hours of interaction with root tissues. We further demonstrated that surfactin synthesis is specifically stimulated upon perception of plant cell wall polymers such as xylan or arabinogalactan, leading to fast accumulation of micromolar amounts in the root environment. At such concentrations, the lipopeptide may not only favour the ecological fitness of the producing strain in term of root colonization, but also triggers systemic resistance in the host plant. This surfactin-induced immunity primes the plant to better resist further pathogen ingress, and involves only limited expression of defence-related molecular events and does not provoke seedling growth inhibition. By contrast with the strong response mounted upon perception of pathogens, this strongly attenuated defensive reaction induced by surfactin in plant tissues should help Bacillus to be tolerated as saprophytic partner by its host. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. [less ▲]

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See detailLipopeptides as main ingredients for inhibition of fungal phytopathogens by Bacillus subtilis/amyloliquefaciens
Cawoy, H.; Debois, Delphine ULg; Franzil, Laurent ULg et al

in Microbial Biotechnology (2015), 8(2), 281-295

Summary: Some isolates of the Bacillus subtilis/amyloliquefaciens species are known for their plant protective activity against fungal phytopathogens. It is notably due to their genetic potential to form ... [more ▼]

Summary: Some isolates of the Bacillus subtilis/amyloliquefaciens species are known for their plant protective activity against fungal phytopathogens. It is notably due to their genetic potential to form an impressive array of antibiotics including non-ribosomal lipopeptides (LPs). In the work presented here, we wanted to gain further insights into the relative role of these LPs in the global antifungal activity of B.subtilis/amyloliquefaciens. To that end, a comparative study was conducted involving multiple strains that were tested against four different phytopathogens. We combined various approaches to further exemplify that secretion of those LPs is a crucial trait in direct pathogen ward off and this can actually be generalized to all members of these species. Our data illustrate that for each LP family, the fungitoxic activity varies in function of the target species and that the production of iturins and fengycins is modulated by the presence of pathogens. Our data on the relative involvement of these LPs in the biocontrol activity and modulation of their production are discussed in the context of natural conditions in the rhizosphere. © 2014 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology. [less ▲]

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