References of "Ollivier, Marc"
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See detailThe EChO science case
Tinetti, Giovanna; Drossart, Pierre; Eccleston, Paul et al

in ArXiv e-prints (2015), 1502

The discovery of almost 2000 exoplanets has revealed an unexpectedly diverse planet population. Observations to date have shown that our Solar System is certainly not representative of the general ... [more ▼]

The discovery of almost 2000 exoplanets has revealed an unexpectedly diverse planet population. Observations to date have shown that our Solar System is certainly not representative of the general population of planets in our Milky Way. The key science questions that urgently need addressing are therefore: What are exoplanets made of? Why are planets as they are? What causes the exceptional diversity observed as compared to the Solar System? EChO (Exoplanet Characterisation Observatory) has been designed as a dedicated survey mission for transit and eclipse spectroscopy capable of observing a large and diverse planet sample within its four-year mission lifetime. EChO can target the atmospheres of super-Earths, Neptune-like, and Jupiter-like planets, in the very hot to temperate zones (planet temperatures of 300K-3000K) of F to M-type host stars. Over the next ten years, several new ground- and space-based transit surveys will come on-line (e.g. NGTS, CHEOPS, TESS, PLATO), which will specifically focus on finding bright, nearby systems. The current rapid rate of discovery would allow the target list to be further optimised in the years prior to EChO's launch and enable the atmospheric characterisation of hundreds of planets. Placing the satellite at L2 provides a cold and stable thermal environment, as well as a large field of regard to allow efficient time-critical observation of targets randomly distributed over the sky. A 1m class telescope is sufficiently large to achieve the necessary spectro-photometric precision. The spectral coverage (0.5-11 micron, goal 16 micron) and SNR to be achieved by EChO, thanks to its high stability and dedicated design, would enable a very accurate measurement of the atmospheric composition and structure of hundreds of exoplanets. [less ▲]

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See detailPotential of balloon payloads for in flight validation of direct and nulling interferometry concepts
Demangeon, Olivier; Ollivier, Marc; Le Duigou, Jean-Michel et al

in Danchi, W. C.; Delplancke, F.; Rajagopal, J. K. (Eds.) Optical and Infrared Interferometry II (2010, July)

While the question of low cost / low science precursors is raised to validate the concepts of direct and nulling interferometry space missions, balloon payloads offer a real opportunity thanks to their ... [more ▼]

While the question of low cost / low science precursors is raised to validate the concepts of direct and nulling interferometry space missions, balloon payloads offer a real opportunity thanks to their relatively low cost and reduced development plan. Taking into account the flight capabilities of various balloon types, we propose in this paper, several concepts of payloads associated to their flight plan. We also discuss the pros and cons of each concepts in terms of technological and science demonstration power. [less ▲]

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See detailDarwin---an experimental astronomy mission to search for extrasolar planets
Cockell, Charles S; Herbst, Tom; Léger, Alain et al

in Experimental Astronomy (2009), 23

As a response to ESA call for mission concepts for its Cosmic Vision 2015--2025 plan, we propose a mission called Darwin. Its primary goal is the study of terrestrial extrasolar planets and the search for ... [more ▼]

As a response to ESA call for mission concepts for its Cosmic Vision 2015--2025 plan, we propose a mission called Darwin. Its primary goal is the study of terrestrial extrasolar planets and the search for life on them. In this paper, we describe different characteristics of the instrument. [less ▲]

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See detailInstrumental stability requirements for exoplanet detection with a nulling interferometer: variability noise as a central issue
Chazelas, Bruno; Brachet, Frank; Bordé, Pascal et al

in Applied Optics (2006), 45

We revisit the nulling interferometer performances that are needed for direct detection and the spectroscopic analysis of exoplanets, e.g., with the DARWIN [European Space Agency-SCI 12 (2000)] or TPF-I ... [more ▼]

We revisit the nulling interferometer performances that are needed for direct detection and the spectroscopic analysis of exoplanets, e.g., with the DARWIN [European Space Agency-SCI 12 (2000)] or TPF-I [JPL Publ. 05-5, (2005)] missions. Two types of requirement are found, one concerning the mean value of the instrumental nulling function <nl(lambda)> and another regarding its stability. The stress is usually put on the former. It is stringent at short wavelengths but somewhat relaxed at longer wavelengths. The latter, which we call the variability noise condition, does not usually receive enough attention. It is required regardless of telescope size and stellar distance. The results from three nulling experiments performed in laboratories around the world are reported and compared with the requirements. All three exhibit 1/f noise that is incompatible with the performances required by the mission. As pointed out by Lay [Appl. Opt. 43, 6100-6123 (2004)], this stability problem is not fully solved by modulation techniques. Adequate solutions must be found that are likely to include servo systems using the stellar signal itself as a reference and internal metrology with high stability. [less ▲]

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