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See detailHow does the visuo-spatial deficit impact basic numerical processing in Williams syndrome? The question of domain specificity.
Rousselle, Laurence ULg; Noel, Marie-Pascale

Poster (2014)

It has been suggested that mathematics learning disabilities, including those of genetic origin, result from a basic impairment of quantitative representations. In Williams syndrome (WS) in particular ... [more ▼]

It has been suggested that mathematics learning disabilities, including those of genetic origin, result from a basic impairment of quantitative representations. In Williams syndrome (WS) in particular, latest studies report a specific deficit in tasks requiring symbolic and non-symbolic numerical magnitude processing (Krajcsi et al., 2009 ; O’Hearn & Landau, 2007; Paterson et al., 2006). However, non-numerical quantitative processing has never been investigated. Moreover, as patients with WS were always tested in the visual modality, it remains unclear whether their deficit is specific to the processing of numerical magnitude or result from their basic visuo-spatial impairment, which is a main characteristic of the WS cognitive phenotype. Therefore, numerical and non-numerical acuity were assessed in a group of 20 patients with WS using quantitative comparison tasks with different visuo-spatial processing requirements. They were compared to 40 typically developing children, half of them matched on verbal mental age and the other half matched on nonverbal mental age. Participants were asked to compare: (1) the length of two sticks (spatial dimension) vs. the duration of two sounds (temporal dimension) to assess non numerical quantitative processing, (2) the numerosity of two visual arrays (spatial arrangement) versus two sequences of flashs (no spatial processing) to assess non-symbolic numerical processing, and (3) two Arabic numbers vs two Spoken verbal numerals to examine the access to symbolic number meaning. Compared to verbal matched participants, participants with WS are impaired in quantitative tasks requiring the processing of visuo-spatial dimension(s) (i.e. comparison of lengths or collections) but not in a visual task requiring processing numerosities with no spatial processing component (i.e. numerical comparison of sequences of flashs). They also present difficulties in accessing the meaning of numerical symbols whatever the format. Their performance corresponds to those of the non verbal typically developing children. [less ▲]

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See detailSymbolic numerical processing deficit in people with Williams syndrome.
Rousselle, Laurence ULg; Noël, Marie-Pascale

Poster (2014)

Recent studies suggest that people with Williams syndrome (WS) present specific deficit in processing numerical magnitudes (Krajcsi et al., 2009; O’Hearn et al., 2007; Paterson et al., 2006).As patients ... [more ▼]

Recent studies suggest that people with Williams syndrome (WS) present specific deficit in processing numerical magnitudes (Krajcsi et al., 2009; O’Hearn et al., 2007; Paterson et al., 2006).As patients with WS were always tested in the visual modality, their deficit could either be specific to the processing of numerical magnitude or result from their basic visuo-spatial impairment (main characteristic of their cognitive phenotype). Supporting the second hypothesis, a first study showed that people with WS have lower numerical acuity only in numerical tasks with high visuo-spatial processing requirements (i.e. comparing two lengths or two arrays of elements but not when comparing two durations or two sequences of flash in a single location; Rousselle et al., 2013). Recently, we tested whether a similar dissociation would be observed in processing the meaning of numerical symbols. Patients with WS were asked to compare the numerical magnitude of two Arabic d vs two spoken verbal numerals. Their subitizing abilities were also assessed through the enumeration of 1 to 7 dots shown for 250 ms. Participants with WS were compared to children matched on verbal or nonverbal mental abilities. Results show that they have difficulties in accessing the meaning of numerical symbols whatever the format and present smaller subitizing [less ▲]

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See detailEvidence for a global access deficit to the meaning of numerical symbols in people with Williams syndrome.
Rousselle, Laurence ULg; Noel, Marie-Pascale

Poster (2014)

Recent studies suggest that patients with Williams syndrome (WS) present specific deficit in processing numerical magnitude (Krajcsi et al., 2009; O’Hearn & Landau, 2007; Paterson et al., 2006 ... [more ▼]

Recent studies suggest that patients with Williams syndrome (WS) present specific deficit in processing numerical magnitude (Krajcsi et al., 2009; O’Hearn & Landau, 2007; Paterson et al., 2006). Contradictory evidence has nevertheless been reported about a possible impairment of their subitizing abilities (Ansari et al., 2007; O’Hearn et al., 2005, 2011). As patients with WS were always tested in the visual modality, it remains unclear whether their deficit is specific to the processing of numerical magnitude or result from their basic visuo-spatial impairment (main characteristic of the WS cognitive phenotype). A first set of results supported the second hypothesis as people with WS were shown to have lower numerical acuity only in numerical tasks with high visuo-spatial processing requirements (i.e. comparing two lengths or two arrays of elements but not when comparing two durations or two sequences of flash in a single location; Rousselle & Noël, 2013). Recently, we tested whether a similar dissociation would be observed in processing the meaning of numerical symbols. Patients with WS were asked to compare the numerical magnitude of two Arabic numbers vs two spoken verbal numerals. They also had to enumerate sets of 1 to 7 dots shown for 250 ms to explore their subitizing abilities. Participants with WS were compared to two groups of children, one matched on verbal and the other matched on nonverbal mental abilities. Our results indicate that people with WS have difficulties in accessing the meaning of numerical symbols whatever the format and present smaller subitizing range. [less ▲]

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See detailHow does the visuo-spatial deficit impact basic numerical processing in Williams syndrome? The question of domain specificity.
Rousselle, Laurence ULg; Noel, Marie-Pascale

Conference (2014)

It has been suggested that mathematics learning disabilities, including those of genetic origin, result from a basic impairment of quantitative representations. In Williams syndrome (WS) in particular ... [more ▼]

It has been suggested that mathematics learning disabilities, including those of genetic origin, result from a basic impairment of quantitative representations. In Williams syndrome (WS) in particular, latest studies report a specific deficit in tasks requiring symbolic and non-symbolic numerical magnitude processing (Krajcsi et al., 2009 ; O’Hearn & Landau, 2007; Paterson et al., 2006). However, non-numerical quantitative processing has never been investigated and contradictory evidence has been reported about their ability to subitize small collections(Ansari et al., 2007; O’Hearn et al., 2005, 2011). Moreover, as patients with WS were always tested in the visual modality, it remains unclear whether their deficit is specific to the processing of numerical magnitude or result from their basic visuo-spatial impairment, which is a main characteristic of the WS cognitive phenotype. Therefore, numerical and non-numerical acuity were assessed in a group of patients with WS using quantitative comparison tasks with different visuo-spatial processing requirements. Participants were asked to compare: (1) the length of two sticks (spatial dimension) vs. the duration of two sounds (temporal dimension) to assess non numerical quantitative processing, (2) the numerosity of two visual arrays (spatial arrangement) versus two sequences of flashs (no spatial processing) to assess non-symbolic numerical processing, and (3) two Arabic numbers vs two Spoken verbal numerals to examine the access to symbolic number meaning. They also had to enumerate sets of 1 to 7 dots shown for 250 ms to explore their subitizing abilities. Results indicate that participants with WS are impaired in quantitative tasks requiring the processing of visuo-spatial dimension(s) (i.e. comparison of lengths or collections) but not in a visual task requiring processing numerosities with no spatial processing component (i.e. numerical comparison of sequences of flashs). They also present difficulties in accessing the meaning of numerical symbols whatever the format and present smaller subitizing range. [less ▲]

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See detailLa dyscalculie développementale : à la croisée de facteurs numériques spécifiques et de facteurs cognitifs généraux
Noël, Marie-Pascale; Rousselle, Laurence ULg; Devisscher, Alice

in Développements (2014), 14

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See detailThe relationship between working memory for serial order and numerical development: a longitudinal study
Attout, Lucie ULg; Noël, Marie-Pascale; Majerus, Steve ULg

in Developmental Psychology (2014), 50(6), 1667-1679

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See detailWhen there seem to be no predetermining factors: Early child and proximal family risk predicting externalizing behavior in young children incurring no distal family risk.
Roskam, Isabelle; Meunier, Jean-Christophe; Stievenart, Marie ULg et al

in Research in Developmental Disabilities (2013), 34

The main objective of the current study was to examine the impact of two child risk factors, i.e. personality and inhibition, and two proximal family risk factors, i.e. parenting and attachment, and the ... [more ▼]

The main objective of the current study was to examine the impact of two child risk factors, i.e. personality and inhibition, and two proximal family risk factors, i.e. parenting and attachment, and the impact of their cumulative effect on later externalizing behavior among young children incurring no distal family risk. Data were collected in a longitudinal two-wave design from 161 non-referred and referred children aged three to five years at the onset of the study. All of the children were raised in families of middle to high socioeconomic status, i.e. their parents were educated to a middle to high level, had access to the job market and lived together as couples. The four risk domains were assessed at the onset of the study, while EB was rated both at the onset of the study and in the 24-month follow-up. Results confirmed that the four risk domains were each both correlates of EB and efficient at discriminating non-referred from referred children; that their combination regardless of their content (cumulative risk) provided a strong prediction of both later EB and non-referred vs referred sample membership. The results are discussed both for research and clinical purposes. [less ▲]

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See detailMagnitude Representations in Williams Syndrome: Differential Acuity in Time, Space and Number Processing.
Rousselle, Laurence ULg; Dembour, Guy; Noël, Marie-Pascale

in PLoS ONE (2013), 8(8), 72621

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See detailHow does the visuo-spatial deficit impact basic numerical processing in Williams syndrome? The question of domain specificity
Rousselle, Laurence ULg; noel, Marie-Pascale

Conference (2012)

It has been suggested that mathematics learning disabilities, including those of genetic origin, result from a basic impairment of quantitative representations. In Williams syndrome in particular, recent ... [more ▼]

It has been suggested that mathematics learning disabilities, including those of genetic origin, result from a basic impairment of quantitative representations. In Williams syndrome in particular, recent studies report a specific deficit in tasks requiring symbolic and non symbolic numerical magnitude processing (Krajcsi et al., 2009 ; O’Hearn & Landau, 2007; Paterson et al., 2006). However, to our knowledge, the integrity of non numerical quantitative processing has never been investigated. Moreover, in the visual modality, it is difficult to disentangle the influence of the massive visuo-spatial impairment, which is a main characteristic of the cognitive phenotype of Williams syndrome, from the numerical magnitude processing deficit. Therefore, numerical and non numerical acuity were assessed in a group of patients with Williams syndrome using tasks with different visuo-spatial processing requirements. To assess the processing of non numerical continuous quantities, participants were asked to compare the length of two sticks (spatial dimension) vs. the duration of two sounds (temporal dimension). Their ability to process non-symbolic numerical magnitudes was explored in tasks requiring the comparison of two arrays of elements (spatial arrangement) versus two sequences of dots flashed in a single location (no spatial processing). Finally, their access to symbolic number meaning was assessed through the numerical comparison of two Arabic numbers vs two Spoken verbal numerals. In each task, the ratio between the quantities was manipulated in order to measure the entire psychophysic curve and to measure the acuity of their numerical and non numerical magnitude representations in non-symbolic tasks. [less ▲]

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See detailVers un déficit numérique de base dans la dyscalculie développementale
Noël, Marie-Pascale; Rousselle, Laurence ULg

in Avoir ou pas la bosse des maths ? Acquisition normale et pathologique des compétences numériques. (2012)

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See detailHow understanding mathematical learning disability may guide mathematics teaching?
Noël, Marie-Pascale; Rousselle, Laurence ULg

in British Journal of Educational Psychology Monographs (2012), Series II, 8

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See detailDevelopmental changes in the profiles of dyscalculia: an explanation based on a double exact-and-approximate number representation model
Noël, Marie-Pascale; Rousselle, Laurence ULg

in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience (2011), 5

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See detailNumerical and nonnumerical estimation in children with and without mathematical learning disabilities
Mejias Vanslype, Sandrine ULg; Mussolin, Christophe; Rousselle, Laurence ULg et al

in Child Neuropsychology (2011), 18(6), 550-575

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See detailThe links between dyslexia and inhibition deficits: do dyslexic children with an inhibition deficit have a specific reading profile?
Verhaegen, Clémence ULg; Schelstraete, Marie-Anne; Noël, Marie-Pascale

Poster (2010, May 28)

The present study focused on the nature of the reading disability of children with both dyslexia and inhibition deficit. Van der Schoot et al. (2000; 2004); Nossent et al. (2005); Nossent and Deroux (2006 ... [more ▼]

The present study focused on the nature of the reading disability of children with both dyslexia and inhibition deficit. Van der Schoot et al. (2000; 2004); Nossent et al. (2005); Nossent and Deroux (2006) showed that these children tended more to guess the words they read because these “guessers” found difficulties in suppressing false candidate words that are activated in the lexicon. To test this account, dyslexic children with and without inhibition deficit were presented a sentence reading task. To evoke guessing, each sentence contained a word or a pseudoword which closely resembled either a valid congruent or incongruent word. Our hypothesis was that dyslexic children with inhibition deficit guessed more the word they read from the sentence context and the global word form than dyslexic children without inhibition deficit. The results showed that both dyslexics with and without inhibition deficit tended more to guess the words than control children without dyslexia and inhibition difficulties. We discussed these results with the fact that most of children with reading difficulties use the sentence context to compensate for poor reading skills. [less ▲]

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See detailThe development of automatic numerosity processing in preschoolers : evidence for numerosity-perceptual interference
Rousselle, Laurence ULg; Noël, Marie-Pascale

in Developmental Psychology (2008), 44

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See detailMental arithmetic in children with learning disabilities : the adaptative use of approximate calculation in an addition verification task.
Rousselle, Laurence ULg; Noël, Marie-Pascale

in Journal of Learning Disabilities (2008), 41

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See detailMagnitude representation in children: Its development and dysfunction
Noël, Marie-Pascale; Rousselle, Laurence ULg

in Campbell, Jamie (Ed.) Handbook of Mathematical Cognition (2005)

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