References of "Nieberding, C"
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See detailThe scent of inbreeding: a male sex pheromone betrays inbred males
Van Bergen, E.; Brakefield, P.; Heuskin, Stéphanie ULg et al

Poster (2013)

Inbreeding depression results from mating among genetically related individuals and impairs reproductive success. The decrease in male mating success is usually attributed to an impact on multiple fitness ... [more ▼]

Inbreeding depression results from mating among genetically related individuals and impairs reproductive success. The decrease in male mating success is usually attributed to an impact on multiple fitness-related traits that reduce the general condition of inbred males. However, the reduced mating success of inbred males could also be a consequence of strong selection on females to avoid mating with an inbred male. This is especially relevant if females gain direct benefits through appropriate mate choice (parental care, territory defences, nuptial gifts) or if they suffer direct costs should they mate with an inbred male (decreased offspring viability and fertility). Here we find that the production of the male sex pheromone is reduced significantly by inbreeding in the butterfly Bicyclus anynana. Other traits indicative of the general condition, including flight performance, are also negatively affected in male butterflies by inbreeding. Yet we unambiguously show that only the production of male pheromones affects mating success. Thus, this pheromone signal informs females about the inbreeding status of their mating partners. We also identify the specific chemical component, hexadecanal, likely responsible for the decrease in male mating success. Our results advocate giving increased attention to olfactory communication as a major causal factor of mate-choice decisions and sexual selection. [less ▲]

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See detailThe scent of inbreeding: male sex pheromones betray inbred males
Nieberding, C.; Van Bergen, E.; Brakefield, P. et al

in Chem. Senses (2013)

Inbreeding depression results from mating among genetically related individualsand impairs reproductive success. The decrease in male matingsuccess is usually attributed to an impact on multiple fitness ... [more ▼]

Inbreeding depression results from mating among genetically related individualsand impairs reproductive success. The decrease in male matingsuccess is usually attributed to an impact on multiple fitness-related traitsthat reduce the general condition of inbred males. Here, we find that the productionof the male sex pheromone is reduced significantly by inbreeding inthe butterfly Bicyclus anynana. Other traits indicative of the general condition,including flight performance, are also negatively affected in malebutterflies by inbreeding. Yet, we unambiguously show that only the productionof male pheromones affects mating success. Thus, this pheromonesignal informs females about the inbreeding status of their mating partners.We also identify the specific chemical component, hexadecanal, probablyresponsible for the decrease in male mating success. Our results advocategiving increased attention to olfactory communication as a major causalfactor of mate-choice decisions and sexual selection.Published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society of London (2013) in press. [less ▲]

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See detailExpanding on olfactory communication in a butterfly: cuticular chemicals indicate sex and age in Bicyclus anynana
Heuskin, Stéphanie ULg; Kaltenpoth, M.; Engl, T. et al

in International Society of Chemical Ecology, 28th Annual Meeting. Abstracts (2012, July)

Chemical (olfactory or gustatory) communication is fundamental to most living organisms but widely understudied compared to other channels of communication such as vision and audition, principally in ... [more ▼]

Chemical (olfactory or gustatory) communication is fundamental to most living organisms but widely understudied compared to other channels of communication such as vision and audition, principally in sexual selection . Here we present the first extensive analysis of cuticular chemical diversity in a butterfly, and investigate whether molecules inform potential mating partners about sex and age. Bicyclus anynana was chosen for its well-known potentialities as a lab model in eco-evo-devo studies , . Chemical interactions have been investigated so far in this species with focus on volatile olfactory components: male sexual pheromones composition and their roles in sexual selection , , their change in ratio with male age, inbreeding coefficient, and other factors . Here we aim completing the picture fully and focus on gustatory non-volatile cuticular chemical diversity in this model species. Indeed, as for Drosophila, the courtship of this butterfly is composed of a series of steps that include short-range interactions during which various chemicals may be involved in mate-choice, through olfactory but also gustatory channels of communication (Nieberding et al., data not published). More than hundred cuticular chemicals were identified and quantified by GC-MS analyses on different parts (abdomen, antennae, head, legs and wings) of B. anynana individuals (n=42, 210 GC-MS analyses) of each sex and at different ages (from 1 to 21 days old). The analysis of the chemical distribution was realised by multivariate statistical analyses (perMANOVA). The results led to the conclusion that some cuticular chemicals are indicative for the body parts and can inform about sex and age. [less ▲]

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See detailA parasite reveals cryptic phylogeographic history of its host.
Nieberding, C.; Morand, S.; Libois, Roland ULg et al

in Proceedings of the Royal Society B : Biological Sciences (2004), 271(1557), 2559-68

This study compares the continental phylogeographic patterns of two wild European species linked by a host-parasite relationship: the field mouse Apodemus sylvaticus and one of its specific parasites, the ... [more ▼]

This study compares the continental phylogeographic patterns of two wild European species linked by a host-parasite relationship: the field mouse Apodemus sylvaticus and one of its specific parasites, the nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus. A total of 740 base pairs (bp) of the mitochondrial cytochrome b (cyt b) gene were sequenced in 122 specimens of H. polygyrus and compared with 94 cyt b gene sequences (974 bp) previously acquired for A. sylvaticus. The results reveal partial spatial and temporal congruences in the differentiation of both species' lineages: the parasite and its host present three similar genetic and geographical lineages, i.e. Western European, Italian and Sicilian, and both species recolonized northwestern Europe from the Iberian refuge at the end of the Pleistocene. However, H. polygyrus presents three particular differentiation events. The relative rate of molecular evolution of the cyt b gene was estimated to be 1.5-fold higher in the parasite than in its host. Therefore, the use of H. polygyrus as a biological magnifying glass is discussed as this parasite may highlight previously undetected historical events of its host. The results show how incorporating phylogeographic information of an obligate associate can help to better understand the phylogeographic pattern of its host. [less ▲]

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See detailMitochondrial phylogeography of the Woodmouse (Apodemus sylvaticus) in the Western Palearctic region.
Michaux, Johan ULg; Magnanou, E.; Paradis, E. et al

in Molecular Ecology (2003), 12(3), 685-97

We sequenced 965 base pairs of the mitochondrial DNA cytochrome b from 102 woodmice (Apodemus sylvaticus) collected from 40 European localities. The aims of the study were to answer the following ... [more ▼]

We sequenced 965 base pairs of the mitochondrial DNA cytochrome b from 102 woodmice (Apodemus sylvaticus) collected from 40 European localities. The aims of the study were to answer the following questions. (i) Did the Mediterranean peninsulas play a role as refuge for woodmice? (ii) Is genetic variability of A. sylvaticus higher in the Mediterranean region compared with northern Europe? (iii) Are the patterns of the postglacial colonization of Europe by woodmice similar to those presently recognized for other European species? The results provide a clear picture of the impact of the Quaternary glaciations on the genetic and geographical structure of the woodmouse. Our analyses indicate a higher genetic variability of woodmice in the Mediterranean peninsulas compared to northern Europe, suggesting a role of the former as refuge regions for this small mammal. An original pattern of postglacial colonization is proposed where the Iberian and southern France refuge populations colonized almost all European regions. The Sicilian population appears to be very differentiated and highly variable. This emphasizes the importance of this island as a 'hot spot' for the intraspecific genetic diversity of the woodmouse. Finally, woodmice in North Africa originated from southwestern Europe, most probably as a result of a recent anthropogenic introduction. [less ▲]

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