References of "Nicks, Baudouin"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailInfluence of sugar beet pulp on feeding behavior, growth performance, carcass quality and gut health of flattening pigs.
Laitat, Martine ULg; Antoine, Nadine ULg; Cabaraux, Jean-François ULg et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (2015), 19(1), 20-31

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (11 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEffects of a high-fibre diet on ammonia and greenhouse gas emissions from gestating sows and fattening pigs
Philippe, François-Xavier ULg; Laitat, Martine ULg; Wavreille, José et al

in Atmospheric Environment (2015), 109

This study aims to measure under barn conditions the emissions of NH3, N2O, CH4 and CO2 associated with gestating sows (trial 1) and fattening pigs (trial 2) fed either a control diet (CTD) based on ... [more ▼]

This study aims to measure under barn conditions the emissions of NH3, N2O, CH4 and CO2 associated with gestating sows (trial 1) and fattening pigs (trial 2) fed either a control diet (CTD) based on cereals or a high-fibre diet (HFD) based on sugar beet pulp (SBP). Three successive batches of 10 Belgian Landrace gestating sows were used for trial 1. Two successive batches of 24 Pi etrain Belgian Landrace fattening pigs were used for trial 2. Animals were kept on slatted floor. The gas emissions were measured by infrared photoacoustic detection and expressed per day and per livestock unit, equals to 500 kg body weight. Similar trends were observed for both animal types. With HFD, the NH3 emissions were reduced (27.2 vs. 36.5 g for the gestating sows, P < 0.001; 23.2 vs. 45.0 g for the fattening pigs, P < 0.001) but the CH4 emissions were increased (41.5 vs. 21.0 g for gestating sows, P < 0.001; 37.9 vs. 27.2 g for fattening pigs, P < 0.001). The fibre content of the diet had not significant impact on N2O emissions (around 1.4 g for gestating sows and 2.1 g for fattening pigs, P > 0.05), and on CO2 emissions (around 6.0 kg for gestating sows and 9.1 kg for fattening pigs, P > 0.05). Most of manure parameters did not statistically differ regarding the treatment. Reproductive performance and body condition of the sows were not affected by the diet. However, growth performance and carcass traits of the HFD-fed fattening pigs were deteriorated compared to CTD. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailReview on greenhouse gas emissions from pig houses: Production of carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide by animals and manure
Philippe, François-Xavier ULg; Nicks, Baudouin ULg

in Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment (2015)

The environmental impacts of livestock production are attracting increasing attention, especially the emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs). Currently, pork is the most widely consumed meat product in the ... [more ▼]

The environmental impacts of livestock production are attracting increasing attention, especially the emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs). Currently, pork is the most widely consumed meat product in the world, and its production is expected to grow in the next few decades. This paper deals with the production of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) by animals and by manure from pig buildings, with a focus on the influence of rearing techniques and nutrition. GHG emissions in piggeries originate from animals through CO2 exhalation and CH4 enteric fermentation, and from manure through the release of CO2, CH4 and N2O. The level of the CO2 exhalation (E-CO2, pig) depends on the physiological stage, the body weight (BW), the production level and the feed intake of the animals concerned. Enteric CH4 (E-CH4, pig) is principally related to dietary fibre intake and the fermentative capacity of the pig’s hindgut. Based on a review of the literature, the following equations are proposed in order to estimate E-CO2, pig (in kg day_1) and E-CH4,pig (in g day_1) for fattening pigs: E-CO2, pig = 0.136 _ BW0.573; E-CH4,pig = 0.012 _ dRes; with BW (in kg) and dRes for digestible residues (in g day_1). Numerous pathways are responsible for GHG production in manure. In addition, the microbial, physical and chemical properties of manure interact and modulate the level of emissions. Influencing factors for removal systems for both liquid and solid fractions of manure have been investigated. A large range of parameters showing an impact on the level of GHG production from pig houses has been reported. However, few of these can be considered unquestionably as GHG mitigation techniques because some strategies have shown contradictory effects depending on the gas, the circumstances and the study. Nevertheless, frequent manure removal seems to be an efficient means to reduce concurrently CO2-, CH4- and N2O-emissions from pig buildings for both slatted and bedded floor systems. Manure removal operations may be associated with specific storage conditions and efficient treatment in order to further reduce emissions. Several feeding strategies have been tested to decrease GHG emissions but they seem to be ineffective in reducing emissions both significantly and durably. In general, good management practices that enhance zootechnical performance will have beneficial consequences on GHG emission intensity. Taking into account the results described in the literature regarding CO2-, CH4- and N2O-production from animals and manure in pig houses, we estimate total GHG emissions to 448.3 kg CO2equiv. per slaughter pig produced or 4.87 kg CO2equiv. per kg carcass. The fattening period accounts for more than 70% of total emissions, while the gestation, lactation and weaning periods each contribute to about 10% of total emissions. Emissions of CO2, CH4 and N2O contribute to 81, 17 and 2% of total emissions from pig buildings, representing 3.87, 0.83 and 0.11 kg CO2equiv. per kg carcass, respectively. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 63 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAnimal health and welfare: equivalent or complementary?
Nicks, Baudouin ULg; Vandenheede, Marc ULg

in Revue scientifique et technique - Office international des épizooties (2014), 33(1), 91-96

Reflexion about the concepts of "health" and "welfare", applied to domestic animals in comparison with humans.

Detailed reference viewed: 101 (52 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEffects of dietary fibre and floor type on greenhouse gas and ammonia emissions associated with gestating sows
Philippe, François-Xavier ULg; Laitat, Martine ULg; Wavreille, José et al

in Proceedings of the 1st FARAH Day, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine (Liège – Belgium) (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAménagement des logettes et confort des vaches laitières
Cazin, Pauline; Nicks, Baudouin ULg; Dufrasne, Isabelle ULg

in INRA Productions Animales (2014), 27(5), 359-368

Cubicle housing offers a good compromise between the needs of the animals and those of the breeders; it is one of the main housing systems for dairy cows. The recommendations relative to the design and ... [more ▼]

Cubicle housing offers a good compromise between the needs of the animals and those of the breeders; it is one of the main housing systems for dairy cows. The recommendations relative to the design and management of cubicle housing are, however, always subject to revision. Special attention is now being given to the improvement of animal comfort, particularly with regards to the lying cow. In this context, the level of comfort is estimated by the duration of the lying time, the frequency of the lying bouts and the ease with which cows are able to get up and lie down. The level of cow comfort is in direct relation to the softness of the floor, to the cubicle dimensions, and to the design of the lateral and frontal partitions. A soft floor can be assured through the use of either multilayer mattresses or a thick litter. Mattresses must be covered with a litter material that absorbs surface moisture and helps to ensure the cleanliness of the stall and udder. To achieve these objectives, the nature of the litter material (straw, sawdust, sand, lime, etc.) appears to be less important than the frequency of renewal. Cubicle floors covered with a thick layer (± 20 cm) of litter seem generally better appreciated by the cows than those equipped with mattresses, and their use is associated with a lower frequency of leg injuries as well as lameness. Sand appears to be a top-grade material for ensuring animal comfort. Nevertheless, the maintenance of a thick layer of litter demands an extra daily labor requirement and the handling of sand as a litter material requires specific equipment. There is a wide range of recommendations on cubicle dimensions due to differences in cow size and the need to take into account the cleanliness of the floor. Lateral partitions must be evaluated for their effectiveness in constraining the animal from spilling out into the neighboring cubicles while at the same time avoiding both injury and difficulties experienced by the cow in getting up and lying down. Finally, frontal partitions must be evaluated regarding their effectiveness in providing sufficient space to allow the cow to thrust its head forward as it stands up. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (7 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailInfluence of the void percentage of the floor on ammonia and greenhouse gas emissions for group-housed gestating sows.
Philippe, François-Xavier ULg; Laitat, Martine ULg; Wavreille, José et al

in Proceedings of the 3rd Scientific Meeting of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailImpact of the amount of straw on emissions of ammonia and greenhouse gases associated with fattening pigs kept on deep litter
Philippe, François-Xavier ULg; Laitat, Martine ULg; Wavreille, José et al

in Proceedings of the 3rd Scientific Meeting of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailComparison of ammonia and greenhouse gases emissions associated to fattening pigs kept either on fully or partly slatted floor
Philippe, François-Xavier ULg; Laitat, Martine ULg; Wavreille, José et al

in Proceedings of the 3rd Scientific Meeting of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEffect of a fibrous diet on growth performance, carcass characteristics and gut health of fattening pigs
Philippe, François-Xavier ULg; Antoine, Nadine ULg; Cabaraux, Jean-François ULg et al

in Proceedings of the 3rd Scientific Meeting of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailContinuous odour measurement from fattening pig units
Romain, Anne-Claude ULg; Nicolas, Jacques ULg; Cobut, Pierre et al

in Atmospheric Environment (2013), 77

A study in experimental slatted-system fattening pig units was conducted with the aim of estimating the odour emission factor (in ou/s.pig), which can subsequently be used in dispersion models to assess ... [more ▼]

A study in experimental slatted-system fattening pig units was conducted with the aim of estimating the odour emission factor (in ou/s.pig), which can subsequently be used in dispersion models to assess the odour annoyance zone. Dynamic olfactometry measurements carried out at different development stages of pigs showed a logical trend of the mean predicted odour emission factor with the pig weight. However, the variation within the same weight class was much larger than variation between classes. Possible causes of such variation were identified as the evolution of ventilation rate during the day and the circadian rhythm of pig. To be able to monitor continuously the daily variation of the odour, an electronic nose was used with suitable regression model calibrated against olfactometric measurements. After appropriate validation check, the electronic nose proved to be convenient, as a complementary tool to dynamic olfactometry, to record the daily variation of the odour emission factor in the pig barn. It was demonstrated that, in the controlled conditions of the experimental pens, the daily variation of the odour emission rate could be mainly attributed to the sole influence of the circadian rhythm of pig. As a consequence, determining a representative odour emission factor in a real case cannot be based on a snapshot odour sampling. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 51 (25 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailInfluence of permanent use of feeding stalls as living area on ammonia and greenhouse gas emissions for group-housed gestating sows kept on straw deep-litter
Philippe, François-Xavier ULg; Laitat, Martine ULg; Wavreille, José et al

in Livestock Science (2013), 155

In pig production, the interest for litter systems in relation with animal welfare and the ban by 2013 in the EU of individual accommodations for gestating sows could promote the group-housing of ... [more ▼]

In pig production, the interest for litter systems in relation with animal welfare and the ban by 2013 in the EU of individual accommodations for gestating sows could promote the group-housing of gestating sows on deep-litter. However, compared to slatted-floor systems, few data are available on the gaseous emissions associated with the different modalities of rearing sows on deep-litter. In this study, two modalities were compared: group housing on a 3 m2/sow deep-litter or on a 1.8 m2/sow deep-litter plus 1.2 m2/sow concrete floor. In both cases, sows were fed in individual feeding stalls (1.2 m2/stall) but the access was limited at feeding time in the first case and permanent in the second one. Three successive batches of 10 gestating sows were used. Each batch was divided into 2 homogeneous groups randomly allocated to one of two treatments: fully (3 m2/sow) or partly (1.8 m2/sow) straw-based deep-bedded floor. The groups were kept separately in two identical rooms with same volume and same surface, equipped with five individual feeding stalls in contact with a pen of either 9 or 15 m2 deep-litter. The feeding stalls were equipped with front feeding troughs and rear gates allowing or not permanent access to the stalls outside of feeding times. Between each batch, the pens were cleaned. In both rooms, ventilation was automatically adapted to maintain a constant ambient temperature. The gas emissions (nitrous oxide, methane, carbon dioxide, ammonia and water vapour) were measured 3 times (weeks 2, 5 and 8 of stay) during 6 consecutive days by infrared photoacoustic detection. Sow performance was not significantly affected by floor type. With sows kept on partly bedded floor, gaseous emissions were significantly greater for methane (12.76 vs. 9.90 g/d.sow; P<0.001), carbon dioxide (3.12 vs. 2.90 kg/d.sow; P<0.01) and water vapour (4.70 vs. 4.03 kg/d.sow; P<0.001), and significantly lower for nitrous oxide (3.14 vs. 6.12 g/d.sow; P<0.001) and CO2 equivalents (1.24 vs. 2.10 kg/d.sow; P<0.001) compared to sows housed on fully bedded floor. There was no significant difference for ammonia emissions (8.36 vs. 7.45 g/d.sow; P>0.05). From the present trial in experimental rooms, it can be concluded that keeping group-housed gestating sows on partly straw bedded floor with permanent access to the concrete feeding stalls compared to fully straw bedded floor did not significantly influence animal performance and NH3-emissions, and decreased CO2eq-emissions (-40%). This decrease was observed owing to an important decrease of N2O-emissions (-49%). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 41 (13 ULg)
Full Text
See detailEmissions of ammonia, nitrous oxide and methane from pig houses: Influencing factors and mitigation techniques
Philippe, François-Xavier ULg; Nicks, Baudouin ULg

in Reconciling livestock management to the environment - Applying Best Available Technique (BAT): From the lab to the farm (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 60 (9 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailGaseous emissions from fattening pigs offered an ad libitum high-fibre diet and kept on fully slatted floor: preliminary results
Philippe, François-Xavier ULg; Laitat, Martine ULg; Wavreille, José et al

in Hassouna, Mélynda; Guingand, Nadine (Eds.) Emissions of Gas and Dust from Livestock (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAmmonia emissions associated to slatted floor and bedded floor systems for fattening pigs and gestating sows
Philippe, François-Xavier ULg; Laitat, Martine ULg; Wavreille, José et al

in Hassouna, Mélynda; Guingand, Nadine (Eds.) Emissions of Gas and Dust from Livestock (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (5 ULg)
Full Text
See detailGaseous emissions from fattening pigs offered an ad libitum high-fibre diet and kept on fully slatted floor: preliminary results
Philippe, François-Xavier ULg; Laitat, Martine ULg; wavreille, José et al

in Proceedings of the 2nd Scientific Meeting of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine (Liège – Belgium) (2012)

According to the literature, the diet composition of livestock can influence polluting gas emissions from agriculture. The aim of this preliminary study was to measure gaseous emissions from fattening ... [more ▼]

According to the literature, the diet composition of livestock can influence polluting gas emissions from agriculture. The aim of this preliminary study was to measure gaseous emissions from fattening pigs offered an ad libitum high-fibre diet (HFD) and kept on fully slatted floor. A batch of 24 fattening pigs was divided into two homogeneous groups randomly allocated to a treatment: conventional cereals-based diet or sugar beet pulpbased diet (HFD). With HFD, a significant decrease of animal performance was observed (837 vs. 962 g for the average daily gain). With pigs offered HFD, gaseous emissions per pig were significantly lower for NH3 (-30%, 6.64 vs. 9.47 g/d; P<0.05) and significantly greater for CH4 (+40%, 6.46 vs. 4.60 g/d; P<0.05). The emissions of N2O (0.34 g/d), CO2equivalent (0.27 kg/d), CO2 (1.68 kg/d) were not significantly influenced by the diet. Due to a more important microbial activity with HFD, the lower NH3-emissions could be attributed to the shift of a part of excreted nitrogen from urine (as urea) to faeces (as protein form), and to a lower slurry pH explained by the increase of volatile fatty acid content. The higher CH4-emissions could be explained by a greater production in the digestive tract and in the slurry due to fibre fermentations. In conclusion, HFD allowed decreasing NH3- and increasing CH4-emissions. However, in terms of climate change, this increase was offset by the decrease of indirect N2O-emissions due to NH3-emission decrease, as indicated by the similar CO2equivalent-emissions in the two groups. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (4 ULg)
Full Text
See detailImpact of the floor type on emissions of ammonia and greenhouse gases from pig houses.
Philippe, François-Xavier ULg; Laitat, Martine ULg; Wavreille, José et al

in Proceedings of the 2nd Scientific Meeting of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine (Liège – Belgium) (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 39 (18 ULg)