References of "Nguyen, Frédéric"
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See detailData-driven selection of the minimum-gradient support parameter in time-lapse focused electrical imaging
Nguyen, Frédéric ULg; Kemna, Andreas; Robert, Tanguy et al

in Geophysics (2016), 81(1), 1-5

We have considered the problem of the choice of the minimum-gradient support (MGS) parameter in focused inversion for time-lapse (TL) electric resistivity tomography. Most existing approaches have relied ... [more ▼]

We have considered the problem of the choice of the minimum-gradient support (MGS) parameter in focused inversion for time-lapse (TL) electric resistivity tomography. Most existing approaches have relied either on an arbitrary choice of this parameter or one based on the prior information, such as the expected contrast in the TL image. We have decided to select the MGS parameter using a line search based on the value of the TL data root-mean-square misfit at the first iteration of the nonlinear inversion procedure. The latter was based on a Gauss-Newton scheme minimizing a regularized objective function in which the regularization functional was defined by the MGS functional. The regularization parameter was optimized to achieve a certain target level, following the Occam principles. We have validated our approach on a synthetic benchmark using a complex and heterogeneous model and determined its effectiveness on electric tomography TL data collected during a salt tracer experiment in fractured limestone. Our results have determined that the approach was successful in retrieving the focused anomaly and did not rely on prior information. [less ▲]

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See detailElectrical resistivity tomography to monitor enhanced biodegradation of hydrocarbons with Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1 at a pilot scale
Masy, Thibaut ULg; Caterina, David; Tromme, Oliver et al

in Journal of Contaminant Hydrology (2016), 184

Petroleum hydrocarbons (HC) represent the most widespread contaminants and in-situ bioremediation remains a competitive treatment in terms of cost and environmental concerns. However, the efficiency of ... [more ▼]

Petroleum hydrocarbons (HC) represent the most widespread contaminants and in-situ bioremediation remains a competitive treatment in terms of cost and environmental concerns. However, the efficiency of such a technique (by biostimulation or bioaugmentation) strongly depends on the environment affected and is still difficult to predict a priori. In order to overcome these uncertainties, Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) appears as a valuable non-invasive tool to detect soil heterogeneities and to monitor biodegradation. The main objective of this study was to isolate an electrical signal linked to an enhanced bacterial activity with ERT, in an aged HC-contaminated clayey loam soil. To achieve this, a pilot tank was built to mimic field conditions. Compared to a first insufficient biostimulation phase, bioaugmentation with Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1 led to a HC depletion of almost 80% (6900 to 1600 ppm) in 3 months in the center of the contaminated zone, where pollutants were less bioavailable. In the meantime, lithological heterogeneities and microbial activities (growth and biosurfactant production) were successively discriminated by ERT images. In the future, this cost-effective technique should be more and more transferred to the field in order to monitor biodegradation processes and assist in selecting the most appropriate remediation technique. [less ▲]

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See detailEvaluating the performance of short-term heat storage in alluvial aquifer with 4D electrical resistivity tomography and hydrological monitoring
Robert, Tanguy; Paulus, Claire; Bolly, Pierre-Yves et al

Poster (2015, December 14)

In the context of energy demand side management (DSM), energy storage solutions are needed to stock energy during high production periods and recover energy during high demand periods. Among currently ... [more ▼]

In the context of energy demand side management (DSM), energy storage solutions are needed to stock energy during high production periods and recover energy during high demand periods. Among currently studied solutions, storing energy in the subsurface through heat pumps and/or exchangers (thermal energy storage) is relatively simple with low investment costs. However, the design and functioning of such systems have strong interconnections with the geology of the site which may be complex and heterogeneous, making predictions difficult. In this context, local temperature measurements are necessary but not sufficient to model heat flow and transport in the subsurface. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) provides spatially distributed information on the temperature distribution in the subsurface. In this study, we monitored, with 4D ERT combined with multiple hydrological measurements in available wells, a short-term heat storage experiment in a confined alluvial aquifer. We injected heated water (ΔT=30K) during 6 hours with a rate of 3 m³/h, stored during 3 days, and then we pumped it back to estimate the energy balance. We collected ERT data sets using 9 parallel profiles of 21 electrodes and cross-lines measurements. Inversion results clearly show the ability of ERT to delimit the thermal plume growth during injection, the diffusion and decrease of temperature during storage, and the decrease in size after pumping. Quantitative interpretation of ERT is difficult at this stage due to strong spatial variations of the total dissolved solid content in the aquifer, due to historical chloride contamination of the site. Energy balance shows that up to 75% of the energy can be easily recovered with an adapted strategy in the context of DSM. Short-term heat storage in alluvial aquifer is efficient and ERT is a valuable tool to image and estimate the temperature distribution in the subsurface. [less ▲]

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See detailTime-lapse inversion of ERT monitoring data using variogram-based regularization
Hermans, Thomas ULg; Dumont, Gaël ULg; Kemna, Andreas et al

Conference (2015, November 24)

Hydrogeophysics has become a major field of research in the past two decades and time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is one of the most popular techniques to monitor passive and active ... [more ▼]

Hydrogeophysics has become a major field of research in the past two decades and time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is one of the most popular techniques to monitor passive and active processes in subsurface reservoirs. Time-lapse inversion schemes have been developed to refine inversion results; but, in contrast with static inversion, they mostly still rely on the spatial regularization procedure based on the standard smoothness constraint. In this contribution, we propose to apply a variogram-based regularization operator in the time-lapse ERT inverse problem, using the model difference covariance matrix to replace the standard smoothing operator. The variogram of resistivity variations can be computed through independent borehole data, such as electromagnetic logs or hydrogeological monitoring, which is often available during monitoring experiments. We first illustrate the method for surface ERT with a synthetic case and compare the results with the standard smoothness constraint solution. This example shows that the variogram-based constraint images better the assumed anomaly both in terms of shape and amplitude. The improvement is largely higher than the one obtained with more classical anisotropic smoothness constraint. This synthetic example also shows that an error made in the range of the variogram has a limited impact on the resulting image, which still remains better than the smoothness constraint result. Anomalies located in various part of the tomograms were tested. Although more crucial in low-sensitivity zones, improvements are observed everywhere in the tomograms. The method is then applied to cross-borehole ERT field data from a heat tracing experiment, where the comparison with direct temperature measurements shows a strong improvement of the breakthrough curves retrieved from ERT. Using the variogram-based regularization, it is possible to reduce the smoothing of resistivity variations in low sensitivity zones and therefore to avoid overestimation of temperatures. The proposed method could be extended to the time dimension which would allow the use of variogram-based constraints in 4D inversion schemes. [less ▲]

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See detailERT monitoring of water infiltration process through a landfill cover layer
Dumont, Gaël ULg; Pilawski, Tamara ULg; Robert, Tanguy et al

in Berichte der Geologischen Bundesanstalt, 112 (2015, November)

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See detailFiber-optic Temperature Profiles Analysis for Closed-loop Geothermal Systems - A Case Study
Radioti, Georgia ULg; Delvoie, Simon ULg; Sartor, Kevin ULg et al

in Second EAGE Workshop on Geomechanics and Energy: The ground as energy source and storage (2015, October)

In order to study the behaviour of shallow closed-loop geothermal systems four borehole heat exchangers equipped with fiber optics were installed on the campus of the University of Liege (Liege, Belgium ... [more ▼]

In order to study the behaviour of shallow closed-loop geothermal systems four borehole heat exchangers equipped with fiber optics were installed on the campus of the University of Liege (Liege, Belgium) over a surface area of 32m². This paper presents the analysis of continuous, high-resolution temperature profiles measured along the boreholes length. The undisturbed ground temperature measurements indicate heat loss from ground structures located close to the boreholes. A 3D numerical model is presented to reproduce the measured temperature profiles. Temperature profiles during hardening of the grouting material indicate extended fractured zones in the rock mass. Temperature measurements during the recovery phase of a Distributed Thermal Response Test indicate the succession of rock layers with different mineral content. The results are in good agreement with those of the borehole televiewer logging method. The presented analysis could provide information on bedrock heterogeneity, on the anisotropic thermal behaviour of the rock mass and on the ground temperature variations due to heat loss from ground structures. These information could significantly contribute to the long-term behaviour prediction of the geothermal system and the geothermal reservoir potential. [less ▲]

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See detailERT monitoring sheds light on the hydrogeological behavior in a landfill
Dumont, Gaël ULg; Nguyen, Frédéric ULg

in EarthDoc - Near Surface Geoscience 2013 – 21th European Meeting of Environmental and Engineering Geophysics (2015, September)

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See detailThe use of the Vadose Zone Experimental Setup as an innovative in situ characterization method for the vadose zone: a case study at an industrial contaminated site in Belgium
Fernandez de Vera, Natalia ULg; Beaujean, Jean ULg; Jamin, Pierre ULg et al

Conference (2015, September)

The development of protection and remediation plans for contaminated soil and groundwater require a detailed understanding of the transport of pollutants in the subsurface. However, such understanding is ... [more ▼]

The development of protection and remediation plans for contaminated soil and groundwater require a detailed understanding of the transport of pollutants in the subsurface. However, such understanding is affected by the lack of spatial and temporal coverage provided by the current in situ characterization technologies. A new system has been developed in order to overcome such limitations. The vadose zone experimental setup is a new development combining cross-hole geophysics and the Vadose Zone Monitoring System (VMS). In cross-hole geophysics, an injection of an electrical current using electrodes installed in vertical boreholes is triggered. From measured potential differences, spatial patterns related with subsurface heterogeneities, water content and solute concentrations are inferred. The VMS allows continuous measurements of water content at different depths of the vadose zone, as well as water sampling. The system is formed by a flexible sleeve containing monitoring units along its depth which is installed in a slanted borehole. The system was installed at a former industrial site in Belgium, where soil and groundwater are contaminated with BTEX, PAH, and heavy metals. Two VMS were installed in two slanted boreholes on site, together with four vertical boreholes containing electrodes for geophysical measurements. The site was initially monitored under natural recharge conditions. Water content sensors located along the VMS registered fast wetting and draining reactions to rainfall events followed by the activation of water transport through fractures. Results from soil water samples show continuous evolution of water chemistry with depth, due to disequilibrium between infiltrated water and the hydrochemical conditions in the unsaturated zone. Subsequently, a saline tracer was injected in the surface. The transport of the tracer in the subsurface was monitored via cross-hole and surface geophysics. Results from imaging reflect the evolution of a plume through vertical and lateral transport and dilution. [less ▲]

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See detailGeophysical Investigation of the Pb-Zn deposit of Plombières, Belgium
Evrard, Maxime ULg; Pirard, Eric ULg; Nguyen, Frédéric ULg

in André-mayer, anne-Sylvie; Cathelineau, Michel; Muchez, Philippe (Eds.) et al Mineral resources in a sustainable worl, proceeding, volume 5 (2015, August)

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See detailERT to monitor the bioremediation of hydrocarbons with Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1 at a pilot scale
Masy, Thibaut ULg; Caterina, David; Tromme, Olivier et al

Conference (2015, June 30)

Petroleum hydrocarbons (HC) represent the most widespread contaminants in the world and in-situ bioremediation remains a competitive treatment in terms of cost and environmental concerns. However, the ... [more ▼]

Petroleum hydrocarbons (HC) represent the most widespread contaminants in the world and in-situ bioremediation remains a competitive treatment in terms of cost and environmental concerns. However, the efficiency of such a technique (by biostimulation or bioaugmentation) strongly depends on numerous environmental characteristics (heterogeneities of the subsurface structure, soil moisture, oxygen and pollutants bioavailability, microbial niches…) and is still difficult to predict a priori. In order to lower these uncertainties, Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) appears as a valuable non-invasive tool to detect soil heterogeneities and to monitor biodegradation. The main objective of this study was thus to isolate with ERT an electrical signature corresponding to an enhanced biodegrading activity, in an aged HC-contaminated clay loam soil. To achieve it, a pilot tank with metric dimensions (3.6 × 0.9 × 0.6 m) and a recirculating system (which is quite unique for this type of purpose) was built to mimic field conditions and to control the evolution of the bio-physico-chemical parameters (microbial concentration in soil and groundwater, temperature, pH, pO2, redox potential, bulk and fluid conductivities, water flow, hydrocarbon content) through time and space. Five panels of electrodes were placed at different locations in the tank to detect lithological heterogeneities and to monitor the bulk resistivity variations with time-lapse ERT. Compared to a first insufficient biostimulation phase with H2O2 and KNO3, bioaugmentation with Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1 led to a HC depletion of almost 80% (6900 to 1600 ppm) in 3 months in the center of the contaminated clay, where pollutants were less bioavailable. Furthermore, lithological heterogeneities (clay, sand, gravels) and microbial activities (growth, degradation and biosurfactant production) were successfully discriminated by ERT images obtained during both remediation phases. In the future, this cost-effective technique should be transferred to the field in order to either (i) detect and forecast biodegradation processes before choosing an appropriate remediation technique, or (ii) monitor the efficiency of this biodegradation during an in-situ bioremediation. [less ▲]

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See detailUse and utility of combined solute and heat tracer tests for characterizing hydrogeothermal properties of an alluvial aquifer
Klepikova, Maria; Wildemeersch, Samuel; Jamin, Pierre ULg et al

Conference (2015, June 05)

Using heat as a tracer together with a solute tracer is interesting for characterizing hydrogeothermal properties of the underground. These properties are particularly needed to dimension any low ... [more ▼]

Using heat as a tracer together with a solute tracer is interesting for characterizing hydrogeothermal properties of the underground. These properties are particularly needed to dimension any low temperature geothermal project using an open doublet system (pumping-reinjection) in a shallow aquifer. The tracing experiment, conducted in the alluvial aquifer of the River Meuse (Hermalle near Liège), consisted in injecting simultaneously heated water at 40°C and a dye tracer in a piezometer and monitoring the evolution of temperature and tracer concentration in the recovery well and in nine monitoring piezometers located in three transects with regards to the main groundwater flow direction. The breakthrough curves measured in the recovery well showed that heat transfer in the alluvial aquifer is slower. All measured results show also that the heat diffusivity is larger than the solute dispersion. These contrasted behaviours are stressed in the lower permeability zones of the aquifer. Inverse modelling is applied for calibrating the numerical simulation of the groundwater flow, heat and solute transport. First results are presented showing that the density effect must be taken into account and that, as expected, the most important parameter to be calibrated accurately is the hydraulic conductivity. [less ▲]

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See detailUncertainty in Training-Image Based Inversion of Hydraulic Head Data Constrained to ERT Data : Workflow and Case Study
Hermans, Thomas ULg; Nguyen, Frédéric ULg; Caers, Jef

Scientific conference (2015, May 06)

In inverse problems, investigating the relationship between data and prior models and the uncertainty related to the posterior distribution of model parameters are as important as matching the data. In ... [more ▼]

In inverse problems, investigating the relationship between data and prior models and the uncertainty related to the posterior distribution of model parameters are as important as matching the data. In recent years, many efforts have been done to assess the posterior distribution of a given problem with reasonable computational costs through inversion techniques such as McMC. The derived posterior distribution is always dependent on the prior distribution. However, most of the studies ignore modeling the prior with realistic uncertainty. In this paper, we propose a workflow to assess the uncertainty of inversion of hydraulic heads data through the addition of electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) constraining data. The workflow is divided in three successive steps: 1) Construction of prior: we generate multiple alternative geological scenarios from literature data (architecture of facies) as well as site specific data (proportions of facies). Spatial uncertainty within each scenario is integrated hierarchically through geostatistics (multiple-point statistics simulation of facies constrained by ERT data as soft data). 2) Validation of prior scenarios: we transform prior facies scenarios into resistivity distribution scenarios through forward and inverse modeling. The scenarios are validated by comparison with field ERT data. The comparison is made through distance calculation and projection into a low dimensional space to calculate the probability of each scenario given field ERT data. 3) Matching dynamical data: we use the probability perturbation method, within each scenario, to integrate hydraulic heads to our models. We account for scenario probabilities, calculated in 2, in determining how many models per scenario we have to consider for building a reliable posterior distribution. The method is first applied on synthetic cases where the "true" model is known. Then, it is apllied a field case study in an alluvial aquifer (Belgium) where we consider prior uncertainty related to the type of elements (gravel channels or bars) and to their size. This study shows the importance of considering the uncertainty of the prior in inverse problems as it has a strong influence on model predictions and decision-making problems. [less ▲]

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See detailFractured bedrock investigation by using high-resolution borehole images and the Distributed Temperature Sensing technique
Radioti, Georgia ULg; Delvoie, Simon ULg; Radu, Jean-Pol ULg et al

in ISRM Congress 2015 Proceedings - Int’l Symposium on Rock Mechanics (2015, May)

In order to investigate the fracturing of the bedrock and its possible heterogeneous distribution in situ, four boreholes equipped with double-U geothermal pipes of 100 m long were installed on the campus ... [more ▼]

In order to investigate the fracturing of the bedrock and its possible heterogeneous distribution in situ, four boreholes equipped with double-U geothermal pipes of 100 m long were installed on the campus of the University of Liege (Liege, Belgium) over a surface area of 32 m². The bedrock, which starts at a depth approximately of 8 m, is quite fractured and consists mainly of siltstone and shale interbedded with sandstone. Different geophysical methods are applied at two different phases, after drilling the boreholes and after injecting the grouting material. The first approach consists in lowering an ultrasonic borehole imager (borehole televiewer; Zemanek, Glenn, Norton, & Caldwell, 1970), an instrument that acts as an ultrasonic transducer and receiver, into the boreholes to obtain high-resolution, continuous images with 360° coverage of the local geology and fracturing. Moreover gamma-ray logs of the four boreholes are obtained and inclinometry is conducted. After drilling the boreholes fiber optic cables are attached along the pipe loops and the double-U pipes are installed inside the boreholes. Then the grouting material is injected. The second approach consists in measuring the temperature along the fibers by applying the Distributed Temperature Sensing technique (Soto, Sahu, Faralli, Bolognini, Di Pasquale, Nebendahl, & Rueck, 2007). A laser pulse is injected into the optical fiber and the temperature along the fiber is determined by the intensity of Raman stokes and anti-stokes reemitted signals. Temperature evolution is measured during hardening of the grouting material. Local maxima of the temperature curve are probably due to a local lower thermal conductivity and/or a local larger quantity of grouting material due to gathering of fractures. A detailed fracture characterisation (position, opening, orientation, dip angle) is obtained based on the acoustic signal travel time and amplitude. The fractures are characterised by the same dipping and orientation but significantly vary in number and location in the four boreholes, despite the close distance between them. Gamma-ray data and observation of the cuttings during drilling result in rock identification through depth as well as in determination of the layer dipping. The inclination of the four boreholes tends to be perpendicular to the dipping. The combination of the two geophysical methods as presented provides information useful for the hydro-thermo-mechanical behaviour of the bedrock. The contribution of the thermal behaviour of borehole heat exchangers to bedrock investigation will be further studied by conducting Distributed Thermal Response tests (Fujii, Okubo, & Itoi, 2006). During the tests we will measure the temperature variation thanks to the installed fiber optics. These data will allow us to correlate any anisotropic thermal behaviour to the geological characteristics. The available information could be used for a detailed numerical model. [less ▲]

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See detailExperimental design to monitor the influence of crop residue management on the dynamics of soil water content
Chelin, Marie ULg; Parvin, Nargish ULg; Hiel, Marie-Pierre ULg et al

Poster (2015, April 15)

Choices related to crop residue management affecting soil structure determine spatio-temporal dynamics of water content and eventually crop yields. In this contribution, we discuss the experimental design ... [more ▼]

Choices related to crop residue management affecting soil structure determine spatio-temporal dynamics of water content and eventually crop yields. In this contribution, we discuss the experimental design we adopted to study the influence of three different agricultural management strategies (tillage and residue management) on the soil water dynamics under maize in a Cutanic Siltic Luvisol in Gembloux, Belgium. In order to limit soil disturbance, we opted for the use electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and we use the bulk electrical conductivity as a proxy for soil moisture content. ERT is collected every week on a surface of two square meters corresponding to three rows of seven maize plants through surface stainless steel electrodes. Four additional sticks with stainless steel electrodes will be vertically inserted into the soil up to 1.20 m to get more detailed information near to the central maize row. In each of the monitoring plots, two time-domain reflectometry (TDR) probes will be installed for data validation. In order to calibrate the relationship between electrical resistivity and soil water content under highly variable field conditions (changes in soil structure, variable weather conditions, plant growth, fertilization), a trench will be dug, in which a set of four electrodes, one TDR probe and one temperature sensor will be placed at four different depths. In addition, two suction cups will be installed in each of the plots to quantify changes in ion composition and electrical conductivity of the soil solution at two different depths. Within the framework of the multidisciplinary research platform AgricultureIsLife, regular assessment of pore structure and crop developement will be conducted using X-ray images. Combining this wide range of data, we will be able to investigate and quantify the effect of simultaneously changing pore water conductivity, soil porosity, soil temperature and soil moisture on the effectiveness of time-lapse ER measurements as a proxy for soil moisture changes. [less ▲]

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See detailRegularized focusing inversion of time-lapse electrical resistivity data: an approach to parametrize the minimum gradient support functional
Nguyen, Frédéric ULg; Hermans, Thomas ULg

Poster (2015, April 15)

Inversion of time-lapse resistivity data allows obtaining ‘snapshots’ of changes occurring in monitored systems for applications such as aquifer storage, geothermal heat exchange, site remediation or ... [more ▼]

Inversion of time-lapse resistivity data allows obtaining ‘snapshots’ of changes occurring in monitored systems for applications such as aquifer storage, geothermal heat exchange, site remediation or tracer tests. Based on these snapshots, one can infer qualitative information on the location and morphology of changes occurring in the subsurface but also quantitative estimates on the degree of changes in certain property such as temperature or total dissolved solid content. Analysis of these changes can provide direct insight into flow and transport and associated processes and controlling parameters. However, the reliability of the analysis is dependent on survey geometry, measurement schemes, data error, and regularization. Survey design parameters may be optimized prior to the monitoring survey. Regularization, on the other hand, may be chosen depending on available information collected during the monitoring. Common approaches consider smoothing model changes both in space and time but it is often needed to obtain a sharp temporal anomaly, for example in fractured aquifers. We here propose to use the alternative regularization approach based on minimum gradient support (MGS) (Zhdanov, 2002) for time-lapse surveys which will focus the changes in tomograms snapshots. MGS will limit the occurrences of changes in electrical resistivity but will also restrict the variations of these changes inside the different zones. A common difficulty encountered by practitioners in this type of regularization is the choice of an additional parameter, the so-called , required to define the MGS functional. To the best of our knowledge, there is no commonly accepted or standard methodology to optimize the MGS parameter . The inversion algorithm used in this study is CRTomo (Kemna 2000). It uses a Gauss-Newton scheme to iteratively minimize an objective function which consists of a data misfit functional and a model constraint functional. A univariate line search is performed at each Gauss-Newton iteration step to find the optimum value of the regularization parameter  which minimizes the data misfit as a function of  while the data misfit is above the desired value and yields the desired target misfit (root-mean square value of error-weighted data misfit equal to 1) at the last iteration for a maximum value of . We propose here to optimize the  of the MGS functional by considering a univariate line search at the first iteration to find the  that minimizes the data misfit. The parameter is then kept constant during the Gauss-Newton iterative scheme. In this contribution, we validate our approach on a numerical benchmark and apply it successfully on a case study in the context of salt tracers in fractured aquifers. Zhdanov M.S. 2002. Geophysical Inverse Theory and Regularization Problems. Elsevier, Amsterdam, 628 p. Kemna A. 2000. Tomographic Inversion of Complex Resistivity - Theory and Application. PhD Thesis, Ruhr University Bochum. [less ▲]

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See detailVariogram-based inversion of time-lapse electrical resistivity data: development and application to a thermal tracing experiment
Hermans, Thomas ULg; Nguyen, Frédéric ULg

Poster (2015, April 15)

Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) has become a popular imaging methodology in a broad range of applications given its large sensitivity to subsurface parameters and its relative simplicity to ... [more ▼]

Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) has become a popular imaging methodology in a broad range of applications given its large sensitivity to subsurface parameters and its relative simplicity to implement. More particularly, time-lapse ERT is now increasingly used for monitoring purposes in many contexts such as water content, permafrost, landslide, seawater intrusion, solute transport or heat transport experiments. Specific inversion schemes have been developed for time-lapse data sets. However, in contrast with static inversions for which many techniques including geostatistical, minimum support or structural inversion are commonly applied, most of the methodologies for time-lapse inversion still rely on non-physically based spatial and/or temporal smoothing of the parameters or parameter changes. In this work, we propose a time-lapse ERT inversion scheme based on the difference inversion scheme. We replace the standard smoothness-constraint regularization operator by the parameter change covariance matrix. This operator takes into account the correlation between changes in resistivity at different locations through a variogram computed using independent data (e.g., electromagnetic logs). It may vary for subsequent time-steps if the correlation length is time-dependent. The methodology is first validated and compared to the standard smoothness-constraint inversion using a synthetic benchmark simulating the injection of a conductive tracer into a homogeneous aquifer inducing changes in resistivity values of known correlation length. We analyze the influence of the assumed correlation length on inversion results. Globally, the method yields better results than the traditional smoothness constraint inversion. Even if a wrong correlation length is assumed, the method performs as well as the smoothness constraint since the regularization operator balances the weight given to the model constraint functional in the objective function. Then the methodology is successfully applied to a heat injection and pumping experiment in an alluvial aquifer. The comparison with direct measurements in boreholes (temperature loggers and distributed temperature sensing optic fibres) shows that ERT-derived temperatures and breakthrough curves image reliably the heat plume through time (increasing part of the curve, maximum and tail are correctly retrieved) and space (lateral variations of temperature are observed) with less spatial smoothing than standard methods. The development of new regularization operators for time-lapse inversion of ERT data is necessary given the broad range of applications where ERT monitoring is used. In many studies, independent data are available to derive geostatistical parameters that can be subsequently used to regularize geophysical inversions. In the future, the integration of spatio-temporal variograms into existing 4D inversion schemes should further improve ERT time-lapse imaging. [less ▲]

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See detailResearch Self-Evaluation Report of the Department ArGEnCo
Collin, Frédéric ULg; Dewals, Benjamin ULg; Elsen, Catherine ULg et al

Report (2015)

Evaluation is nowadays a general trend in the European Universities. At the University of Liège, the evaluation process is threefold: fist there is the evaluation of the bachelor and master degrees, then ... [more ▼]

Evaluation is nowadays a general trend in the European Universities. At the University of Liège, the evaluation process is threefold: fist there is the evaluation of the bachelor and master degrees, then the second evaluation concerns the internal administrations and finally Research activities are being evaluated. This quality policy at the different levels of the Institution is organized by the Vice-Rector for Quality, Pr. Freddy Coignoul and the SMAQ service (Service de Management et d’Accompagnement à la Qualité), which aims to promote, coordinate and disseminate within the University of Liège a culture of the Quality, founded on the values of the Institution. The Research assessment is a procedure undertaken by the University in order to promote the quality of the research in the Departments or research centres. Within the Faculty of Applied Sciences, the evaluation of the Bachelor and Master degrees in Engineering was carried out in 2013 by the AEQES (Agence pour l’Evaluation de la Qualité de l’Enseignement) and CTI (Commission des Titres d’Ingénieur - France). The present report is dedicated to the evaluation of research led in the Education and Research Department (DER) ArGEnCo. The present evaluation report proposes a global presentation of all our research activities. At the Department level, one of the elected members of the Executive Bureau is in charge of the Research, covering both evaluation and quality policy. In October 2013, the Executive bureau appointed a research steering committee, whose fist task was to coordinate the present evaluation report, following the guidelines of the SMAQ service. The draft of such a document arises from the work of the steering committee but also from the contributions of all Department members, who were asked to contribute to the report or to complete databases. The progress of this evaluation report was presented by the Steering committee to the Department Council and during the General Assembly of the Department. Moreover, two Focus groups were organized by the SMAQ service, in order to get the feedback of technician and administrative members on one hand and scientific members on the other hand, on the general organization of the research in the ArGEnCo Department. The reports of these two Focus groups (Appendix 4 in French) underpinned our thinking about our research management. This report is therefore the fist evaluation of the research led in the Department, the present effort should be pursued, and deepened, within the coming years. Some of the databases necessary for the evaluation have been developed in the frame of this procedure. This has resulted in a huge amount of work for every Department members to collect all the data. New procedures in the management of the Department will help establishing the next research evaluation reports systematically, in particular for the collection of the complete dataset. Following the guidelines of the SMAQ service, this evaluation report is divided into two main parts: the fist one focuses on a self-evaluation report of the research activities and the second part presents the Action Plan of the Department for the next five years to come. The self-evaluation report is composed of four Sections: Section one presents the Research organization and topics of the Department, Section two focuses on the Research activities, Section three gives an overview of the mobility (in and out), the attractiveness and the scientific recognition of the Department and finally Section four is dedicated to the resources available in ArGEnCo Department. Each Section ends up with a SWOT analysis. The Action Plan proposed by the Steering Committee results from the analysis of the self-evaluation report, insofar as it synthesizes and prioritizes the actions of the Department for the next fie years. These priorities are formulated as proposals following a contractual approach between research entities and Institution authorities, to whom the report will be presented. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization of superficial deposits using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio (HVSR) geophysical methods: A case study
Sauret, Elie; Beaujean, Jean; Nguyen, Frédéric ULg et al

in Journal of Applied Geophysics (2015), 121

In developing countries, superficial aquifers are potential water resources for irrigation in agriculture. Cost effective methodologies are required to characterize those deposits in order to identify ... [more ▼]

In developing countries, superficial aquifers are potential water resources for irrigation in agriculture. Cost effective methodologies are required to characterize those deposits in order to identify better locations for groundwater abstraction. This study has investigated the potential use of combined electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio (HVSR) to characterize the heterogeneity and thickness of superficial deposits deployed along of a river. The ERT and HVSRmethods are non-invasive geophysical techniques, simple, efficient, robust and easy-to-use in alluvial environment contexts. Using these geophysicalmethods in the Kou basin in Burkina Faso (West Africa), a good correspondence is obtained between ERT images and resonance frequencies determined on theHVSR profiles perpendicular to the Kou River. The superficial deposits and the bedrock depth have been characterized and mapped. The role of faulting andmagmatic intrusions in the accumulation of fractured, deconsolidated andweathered bedrockmaterials and the filling of superficial deposits have been observed and highlighted. Froma hydrogeological point of view, the thickness of (clay-free) superficial deposits presents a relatively important groundwater reservoir and potentially high productivity. The ERT and HVSR were proven to be efficient and complementary methods in superficial deposit environment characterization, and a viable option for exploration of superficial deposits in terms of groundwater reservoir in environments where the bedrock exhibits strong lateral variation due to faulting or volcanic activities. [less ▲]

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See detailVadose zone characterisation at industrial contaminated sites
Fernandez de Vera, Natalia ULg; Dahan, Ofer; Dassargues, Alain ULg et al

in CL:AIRE bulletin (2015)

In order to improve risk characterization and remediation measures for soil and groundwater contamination, there is a need to improve in situ vadose zone characterization. However, most available ... [more ▼]

In order to improve risk characterization and remediation measures for soil and groundwater contamination, there is a need to improve in situ vadose zone characterization. However, most available technologies have been developed in the context of agricultural soils. Such methodologies are not applicable at industrial sites, where soils and contamination differ in origin and composition. To overcome such difficulties, a vadose zone experiment has been setup at a former industrial site in Belgium. Industrial activities carried out on site left a legacy of soil and groundwater contamination in BTEX, PAH, cyanide and heavy metals. The experiment comprises the combination of two techniques: the Vadose Zone Monitoring System (VMS) and cross-hole geophysics. The VMS allows continuous measurements of water content at different depths of the vadose zone, as well as the possibility of water sampling at different depths. The system is formed by a flexible sleeve containing monitoring units along its depth which is installed in a slanted borehole. The flexible sleeve contains three types of monitoring units in the vadose zone: Time Domain Transmissometry (TDT), which allows water content measurements; Vadose Sampling Ports (VSP), used for collecting water samples coming from the matrix; the Fracture Samplers (FS), which are used for retrieving water samples from the fractures. Cross-hole geophysics techniques consist in the injection of an electrical current using electrodes installed in vertical boreholes. From such injections, spatial patterns related with subsurface heterogeneities, water content and solute concentrations are inferred. Two VMS were installed in two slanted boreholes on site, together with four vertical boreholes containing electrodes for geophysical measurements. The site was monitored under natural recharge conditions. Results show the reaction of the vadose zone to rainfall events, as well as chemical evolution of soil water with depth and rainfall infiltration. [less ▲]

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