References of "Muto, Vincenzo"
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See detailHuman cortical excitability depends on time awake and circadian phase
Gaggioni, Giulia ULg; Ly, Julien; Chellappa, Sarah Laxhmi ULg et al

Poster (2015, January 27)

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See detailAutomatic artifact detection for whole-night polysomnographic sleep recordings
Coppieters't Wallant, Dorothée ULg; Chellappa, Sarah Laxhmi ULg; Gaggioni, Giulia ULg et al

Poster (2014, September 17)

Detecting of bad channels and artifacts for whole-night polysomnographic recordings is very time consuming and tedious. We therefore developed an automatic procedure to automatize this job.

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See detailAutomatic biorythms description from actigraphic data
González y Viagas, Miguel ULg; Ly, Julien ULg; Gaggioni, Giulia ULg et al

Poster (2014, September)

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See detailInfluence of noise correction on intra- and inter-subject variability of quantitative metrics in diffusion kurtosis imaging
André, Elodie ULg; Grinberg, Farida; Farrher, Ezequiel et al

in PLoS ONE (2014)

Diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) is a promising extension of diffusion tensor imaging, giving new insights into the white matter microstructure and providing new biomarkers. Given the rapidly increasing ... [more ▼]

Diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) is a promising extension of diffusion tensor imaging, giving new insights into the white matter microstructure and providing new biomarkers. Given the rapidly increasing number of studies, DKI has a potential to establish itself as a valuable tool in brain diagnostics. However, to become a routine procedure, DKI still needs to be improved in terms of robustness, reliability, and reproducibility. As it requires acquisitions at higher diffusion31 weightings, results are more affected by noise than in diffusion tensor imaging. The lack of standard procedures for post-processing, especially for noise correction, might become a significant obstacle for the use of DKI in clinical routine limiting its application. We considered two noise correction schemes accounting for the noise properties of multichannel phased-array coils, in order to improve the data quality at signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) typical for DKI. The SNR dependence of estimated DKI metrics such as mean kurtosis (MK), mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA) is investigated for these noise correction approaches in Monte Carlo simulations and in in vivo human studies. The intra-subject reproducibility is investigated in a single subject study by varying the SNR level and SNR spatial distribution. Then the impact of the noise correction on inter-subject variability is evaluated in a homogeneous sample of 25 healthy volunteers. Results show a strong impact of noise correction on the MK estimate, while the estimation of FA and MD was affected to a lesser extent. Both intra- and inter-subject SNR related variability of the MK estimate is considerably reduced after correction for the noise bias, providing more accurate and reproducible measures. In this work, we have proposed a straightforward method that improves accuracy of DKI metrics. This should contribute to standardization of DKI applications in clinical studies and making valuable inferences in group analysis and longitudinal studies. [less ▲]

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See detailSleep loss changes executive brain responses in the wake maintenance zone
Jaspar, Mathieu ULg; Meyer, Christelle ULg; Muto, Vincenzo ULg et al

Conference (2014)

Objectives:Brain mechanisms underlying executive processes are regulated by circadian and sleep homeostatic processes. Furthermore, during sleep deprivation (SD), cognitive performance and neural ... [more ▼]

Objectives:Brain mechanisms underlying executive processes are regulated by circadian and sleep homeostatic processes. Furthermore, during sleep deprivation (SD), cognitive performance and neural responses are differentially modulated by a clock gene PERIOD3 polymorphism. Here, we investigated interindividual differences on executive brain responses under SD. Critically, we focused on the circadian evening wake maintenance zone (WMZ), a key time-point for sleep-wake regulation. Methods:Thirty healthy young volunteers, genotyped for the PER3 polymorphism (10 PER3 5/5;20 PER3 4/4 homozygotes), underwent42-h SD under constant routine conditions. They performed a 3-back working memorytask in 13successivefMRI sessions. To compare neural activity in the WMZ before and during SD, sessions were realigned according to individual dim light melatonin onset. Results:We tested for a group (PER3 5/5>PER3 4/4) by session effect (WMZ before vs. during SD). From the first evening WMZ(i.e. during a normal waking day) to the second (i.e. following 40h of continuous waking), PER3 5/5 individuals relative toPER3 4/4 showed significantly larger increase in responsesin the left mid-cingulate, bilateral precuneus and thalamus. Interestingly, these regions are involved in executive processes and arousal regulation (thalamus). Conclusions:These results show that the strong circadian wake-maintenance signal depends on sleep pressure, in a PER3-genotype dependent manner. Interestingly, pronounced genotype differences wereobserved in the thalamus, an area that compensates potential lower cortical activity under SD. [less ▲]

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See detailSleep loss changes executive brain responses in the wake maintenance zone
Jaspar, Mathieu ULg; Meyer, Christelle ULg; Muto, Vincenzo ULg et al

in Journal of Sleep Research (2014), 23(1), 61

Objectives: Brain mechanisms underlying executive processes are regulated by circadian and sleep homeostatic processes. Furthermore, during sleep deprivation (SD), cognitive performance and neural ... [more ▼]

Objectives: Brain mechanisms underlying executive processes are regulated by circadian and sleep homeostatic processes. Furthermore, during sleep deprivation (SD), cognitive performance and neural responses are differentially modulated by a clock gene PERIOD3 polymorphism. Here, we investigated interindividual differences on executive brain responses under SD. Critically, we focused on the circadian evening wake maintenance zone (WMZ), a key time-point for sleep-wake regulation. Methods: Thirty healthy young volunteers, genotyped for the PER3 polymorphism (10 PER3 5/5; 20 PER3 4/4 homozygotes), underwent 42-h SD under constant routine conditions. They performed a 3-back working memory task in 13 successive fMRI sessions. To compare neural activity in the WMZ before and during SD, sessions were realigned according to individual dim light melatonin onset. Results: We tested for a group (PER3 5/5 > PER3 4/4) by session effect (WMZ before vs. during SD). From the fi rst evening WMZ (i.e. during a normal waking day) to the second (i.e. following 40 h of continuous waking), PER3 5/5 individuals relative to PER3 4/4 showed significantly larger increase in responses in the left mid-cingulate, bilateral precuneus and thalamus. Interestingly, these regions are involved in executive processes and arousal regulation (thalamus). Conclusions: These results show that the strong circadian wake-maintenance signal depends on sleep pressure, in a PER3-genotype dependent manner. Interestingly, pronounced genotype differences were observed in the thalamus, an area that compensates potential lower cortical activity under SD. [less ▲]

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See detailSeasonal variation in human executive brain responses
Meyer, Christelle ULg; Jaspar, Mathieu ULg; Muto, Vincenzo ULg et al

Poster (2014)

It is well established that cognition shows daily fluctuations with changes in circadian phase and sleep pressure. The physiological impact of season changes, which is well characterized in animals ... [more ▼]

It is well established that cognition shows daily fluctuations with changes in circadian phase and sleep pressure. The physiological impact of season changes, which is well characterized in animals, remains largely unexplored in human. Here we investigated the impact of seasonal variation on human cognitive brain function. This cross-sectional study,conducted in Liège (Belgium),spanned from May 2010 to October 2011. Following 8h in-lab baseline night of sleep, 30 volunteers (age 20.9+1.5; 15F)spent 42h awake under constant routine conditions(<5lux, semi-recumbent position, no time-cues). After12h recovery night, they underwent15minfMRI recording while performing a working memory 3-back task (3b) and a letter detection 0-back task (0b). Thus, fMRI data were acquired when volunteers had been in isolation under controlled conditionsfor 63h. Executive brain responses were isolated by subtracting 0b activity from 3b responses (3b>0b).Analysis tested seasonal influence on executive brain responses at the random effects level, using a phasoranalysis across the year.Inferences were conducted at p<0.05, after correction for multiple comparisons over a priori small volume of interest. Significanteffects of season on executive responses were detected inmiddle frontal and frontopolarregions, insula, and thalamus, with a maximum response at the end of summer and a minimum response at the end of winter.These brain areas are key regions for executive control and alertness. These results constitute the first demonstration that seasonality directly impacts on human cognitive brain functions. [less ▲]

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See detailModulating effect of COMT genotype on the brain regions underlying proactive control process during inhibition
Jaspar, Mathieu ULg; Genon, Sarah ULg; Muto, Vincenzo ULg et al

in Cortex : A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior (2014), 50

Introduction. Genetic variability related to the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene (Val158Met polymorphism) has received increasing attention as a possible modulator of cognitive control functions ... [more ▼]

Introduction. Genetic variability related to the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene (Val158Met polymorphism) has received increasing attention as a possible modulator of cognitive control functions. Methods. In an event-related fMRI study, a modified version of the Stroop task was administered to three groups of 15 young adults according to their COMT Val158Met genotype [Val/Val (VV), Val/Met (VM) and Met/Met (MM)]. Based on the theory of dual mechanisms of control (Braver, et al., 2007), the Stroop task has been built to induce proactive or reactive control processes according to the task context. Results. Behavioral results did not show any significant group differences for reaction times but Val allele carriers individuals are less accurate in the processing of incongruent items. fMRI results revealed that proactive control is specifically associated with increased activity in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) in carriers of the Met allele, while increased activity is observed in the middle frontal gyrus (MFG) in carriers of the Val allele. Conclusion. These observations, in keeping with a higher cortical dopamine level in MM individuals, support the hypothesis of a COMT Val158Met genotype modulation of the brain regions underlying proactive control, especially in frontal areas as suggested by Braver et al. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of circadian rhythm and PER3 genotype on executive discriminative ability under sleep deprivation during a constant routine
Jaspar, Mathieu ULg; Meyer, Christelle ULg; Muto, Vincenzo ULg et al

Conference (2013, August 12)

Maintaining optimal performance during a working memory task requires not only to detect target items but also to discard fillers. Following signal detection theory, the ability to discriminate target ... [more ▼]

Maintaining optimal performance during a working memory task requires not only to detect target items but also to discard fillers. Following signal detection theory, the ability to discriminate target from non-target stimuli is estimated by d prime (d'). Here we assessed whether d' was modulated by the oscillating circadian signal during a 42-hour constant routine while participants performed 13 sessions of auditory 3-back task. We also tested whether the individual vulnerability to sleep loss predicted by the PERIOD3 gene polymorphism would influence this cognitive modulation imposed by sleep/wake regulation. From a sample of about 400 screened volunteers, thirty-five healthy young volunteers (age 19-26; 17 females) were recruited based on the PER3 polymorphism (twelve 5/5 and twenty-three 4/4 homozygotes). A linear mixed model tested on d’ the effect of circadian rhythmicity (based on melatonin level) and PER3 polymorphism. Given that 3back sessions were not administered at equidistant points, we used ranges to center each individual performance on dim light melatonin onset (DLMO). Analyses on d’ showed an effect of circadian oscillation (F(12,302) = 16.05, p< 0.0001), but also an interaction between gene and circadian oscillation (F(12,302)=1,88, p = 0.0362). This interaction was mainly characterized by a worst d’ in PER35/5subjects in the range covering a period between 21 and 23 hours after the DLMO (W=47; p = 0.0426). These results showed that circadian rhythm influence the discriminative ability under constant routine condition. Interestingly, we observed a better performance in PER34/4in the phase preceding the DLMO, but only in situation of high sleep pressure. Those results show that discriminative ability is differently affect by sleep homeostasis in PER3 polymorphism at the same circadian phase. We interpret this as a bigger vulnerability to sleep loss in PER35/5individuals in the period just before the wake maintenance zone. [less ▲]

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See detailAltered white matter architecture in BDNF Met carriers
Ziegler, Erik ULg; Foret, Ariane; Mascetti, Laura ULg et al

in PLoS ONE (2013)

Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) modulates the pruning of synaptically-silent axonal arbors. The Met allele of the BDNF gene is associated with a reduction in the neurotrophin's activity-dependent ... [more ▼]

Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) modulates the pruning of synaptically-silent axonal arbors. The Met allele of the BDNF gene is associated with a reduction in the neurotrophin's activity-dependent release. We used di ffusion-weighted imaging to construct structural brain networks for 36 healthy subjects with known BDNF genotypes. Through permutation testing we discovered clear di fferences in connection strength between subjects carrying the Met allele and those homozygotic for the Val allele. We trained a Gaussian process classi fier capable of identifying the subjects' allelic group with 86% accuracy and high predictive value. In Met carriers structural connectivity was greatly increased throughout the forebrain, particularly in connections corresponding to the anterior and superior corona radiata as well as corticothalamic and corticospinal projections from the sensorimotor, premotor and prefrontal portions of the internal capsule. Interhemispheric connectivity was also increased via the corpus callosum and anterior commissure, and extremely high connectivity values were found between inferior medial frontal polar regions via the anterior forceps. We propose that the decreased availability of BDNF leads to de cifits in axonal maintenance in carriers of the Met allele, and that this produces mesoscale changes in white matter architecture. [less ▲]

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See detailConnectome-based classification of BDNF Met allele carriers
Phillips, Christophe ULg; Foret, Ariane; Mascetti, Laura et al

Conference (2013, June 19)

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See detailConnectome-based classification of BDNF Met allele carriers
Ziegler, Erik ULg; Foret, Ariane; Mascetti, Laura ULg et al

Poster (2013, June)

Secretion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is essential for synaptic plasticity in the central nervous system during neurodevelopment [Huang]. A common human non-synonymous SNIP in the BDNF ... [more ▼]

Secretion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is essential for synaptic plasticity in the central nervous system during neurodevelopment [Huang]. A common human non-synonymous SNIP in the BDNF gene (Val66Met, rs6265) decreases activity-dependent BDNF release in neurons transfected with the human A allele (Met-BDNF). We reasoned that the persistent differential activity-dependent BDNF release implied by this polymorphism should also be associated with differences in adult brain structure. The study population comprised 36 healthy subjects (aged 18-25): 15 (9 male) were identified as carrying the Met allele (“Met carrier” group) and 21 (9 male) were homozygotes for the Val allele (“Val/Val” group). The groups did not vary significantly in IQ, age nor scores for a battery of psychological tests. A high-resolution T1-weighted image (sMRI), 7 unweighted (b=0) and a set of diffusion-weighted (b=1000) images using 61 non-collinear directional gradients were acquired for each subject. The processing workflow relied on several pieces of software and was developed in Python and Nipype. The sMRIs were segmented using the automated labeling of Freesurfer [Desikan] and further parcellated using the Lausanne2008 atlas into 1015 regions of interest (ROIs) [Cammoun]. DWIs were corrected for image distortions (due to eddy currents) using linear coregistration functions from FSL [Smith]. Fractional anisotropy maps were generated, and a few single-fiber (high FA) voxels were used to estimate the spherical harmonic coefficients (order 8) of the response function from the DWIs [Tournier]. Then orientation distribution functions were obtained at each voxel. Probabilistic tractography was performed throughout the whole brain using seeds from subject-specific white-matter masks and a predefined number of tracts (300,000), see Fig. 1. The tracks were affine-transformed into the subject's structural space with Dipy [Garyfallidis]. Connectome mapping was performed by considering every contact point between each tract and the outlined ROIs (unlike in [Hagmann]): the connectivity matrix was incremented every time a single fiber traversed between any two ROIs. We trained a Gaussian Process Classifier [Rasmussen] (interfaced by PRoNTo [Schrouff]) on these connectivity matrices. The accuracy and generalization ability of the classification were assessed with a leave-one-subject-out cross-validation procedure. With this linear kernel method weights were also obtained indicating the contribution to the classification output (in favor of either genotypic group) of each edge in the network. The same method was employed to discriminate features related to the subjects' gender and genotype for the ADA gene. The classifier was able to discriminate between Val/Val and Met carriers with 86.1% balanced accuracy. The predictive value for the Val/Val and Met carrier groups were 94.4% (p=0.001) and 77.8% (p=0.003), respectively. In Fig. 2 the weights obtained by the classifier are visualized as edges in the brain network. For the classifier trained to identify gender or the subjects' ADA genotype, the global accuracy reached 63.9% (n.s.) and 58.3% (n.s.) respectively. Using high-resolution connectome mapping from normal young healthy human volunteers grouped based on the Met allele of the BNDF gene, we show that the BDNF genotype of an individual can be significantly identified from his structural brain wiring. These differences appear specific to this allele; no such difference could be found for the polymorphism in the ADA gene, or even for gender. We propose that the decreased availability of BDNF leads to deficits in axonal maintenance in Met carriers, and that this produces mesoscale changes in white matter architecture. Acknowledgements: the FNRS, the ULg, the Queen Elisabeth Medical Foundation, the Léon Fredericq Foundation, the Belgian Inter-University Attraction Program, the Welbio program, and the MCITN in Neurophysics (PITN-GA-2009-238593). Cammoun L. et al. (2011), ‘Mapping the human connectome at multiple scales with diffusion spectrum MRI’, J Neuroscience Methods, 203:386–397. Desikan R.S. et al. (2006), ‘An automated labeling system for subdividing the human cerebral cortex on MRI scans into gyral based regions of interest’, Neuroimage, 31:968-980. Hagmann P. et al. (2008), ‘Mapping the structural core of human cerebral cortex’, PLoS Biology, 6:e159 Huang E.J., Reichardt L.F. (2001), ‘Neurotrophins: roles in neuronal development and function’, Annual Review of Neuroscience, 24:677-736. Garyfallidis E. et al. (2011), ‘Dipy - a novel software library for diffusion MR and tractography’, 17th Annual Meeting of the Organization for Human Brain Mapping. http://nipy.sourceforge.net/dipy/ Rasmussen C.E. (2006), Gaussian processes for machine learning. Schrouff J. et al. (2012), ‘PRoNTo: Pattern Recognition for Neuroimaging Toolbox’, 18th Annual Meeting of the Organization for Human Brain Mapping. http://www.mlnl.cs.ucl.ac.uk/pronto Smith S.M. et al. (2004), ‘Advances in functional and structural MR image analysis and implementation as FSL’, Neuroimage, 23 Suppl 1:S208-S219. Tournier J.D., et al. (2007), ‘Robust determination of the fibre orientation distribution in diffusion MRI: non-negativity constrained super-resolved spherical deconvolution’, Neuroimage, 35:1459-1472. [less ▲]

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See detailFunctional neuroimaging of human REM sleep
Meyer, Christelle ULg; Jedidi, Zayd ULg; Muto, Vincenzo ULg et al

in Nofzinger, Eric; Maquet, Pierre; Thorpy, Michael J. (Eds.) Neuroimaging of sleep and sleep disorders (2013)

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See detailThe impact of visual perceptual learning on sleep and local slow wave initiation
Mascetti, Laura ULg; Muto, Vincenzo ULg; Matarazzo, Luca et al

in Journal of Neuroscience (2013)

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See detailConcurrent Synaptic and Systems Memory Consolidation during Sleep
Mascetti, Laura; Foret, Ariane; Schrouff, Jessica ULg et al

in Journal of Neuroscience (2013), 33(24), 10182-10190

Memories are consolidated during sleep by two apparently antagonistic processes: (1) reinforcement of memory-specific cortical interactions and (2) homeostatic reduction in synaptic efficiency. Using fMRI ... [more ▼]

Memories are consolidated during sleep by two apparently antagonistic processes: (1) reinforcement of memory-specific cortical interactions and (2) homeostatic reduction in synaptic efficiency. Using fMRI, we assessed whether episodic memories are processed during sleep by either or both mechanisms, by comparing recollection before and after sleep. We probed whether LTP influences these processes by contrasting two groups of individuals prospectively recruited based on BDNF rs6265 (Val66Met) polymorphism. Between immediate retrieval and delayed testing scheduled after sleep, responses to recollection increased significantly more in Val/Val individuals than in Met carriers in parietal and occipital areas not previously engaged in retrieval, consistent with “systems-level consolidation.” Responses also increased differentially between allelic groups in regions already activated before sleep but only in proportion to slow oscillation power, in keeping with “synaptic downscaling.” Episodic memories seem processed at both synaptic and systemic levels during sleep by mechanisms involving LTP. [less ▲]

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