References of "Muto, Vincenzo"
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See detailAge-related differences in the dynamics of cortical excitability and cognitive inhibition during prolongedwakefulness
Gaggioni, Giulia ULg; Chelllappa, S.; Ly, J. et al

Conference (2016, September)

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See detailLocal modulation of human brain responses by circadian rhythmicity and sleep debt
Muto, Vincenzo ULg; Jaspar, Mathieu ULg; Meyer, Christelle et al

in Science (2016), 351(6300),

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See detailSeasonal variation in human COGNITIVE brain responses
Meyer, Christelle; Muto, Vincenzo ULg; Jaspar, Mathieu ULg et al

Poster (2016, June)

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See detailThe impact of dopaminergic genes on inhibitory processes and cognitive control.
Jaspar, Mathieu ULg; Muto, Vincenzo ULg; Meyer, Christelle et al

Poster (2016, March 18)

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See detailSeasonality in human cognitive brain responses
Meyer, Christelle ULg; Muto, Vincenzo ULg; Jaspar, Mathieu ULg et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2016)

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See detailAutomatic artifacts and arousals detection in whole-night sleep EEG recordings
Coppieters't Wallant, Dorothe ULg; Muto, Vincenzo ULg; Gaggioni, Giulia ULg et al

in Journal of Neuroscience Methods (2016), 258

In sleep electroencephalographic (EEG) signals, artifacts and arousals marking are usually part of the processing. This visual inspection by a human expert has two main drawbacks: it is very time ... [more ▼]

In sleep electroencephalographic (EEG) signals, artifacts and arousals marking are usually part of the processing. This visual inspection by a human expert has two main drawbacks: it is very time consuming and subjective. To detect artifacts and arousals in a reliable, systematic and reproducible automatic way, we developed an automatic detection based on time and frequency analysis with adapted thresholds derived from data themselves. The automatic detection performance is assessed using 5 statistic parameters, on 60 whole night sleep recordings coming from 35 healthy volunteers (male and female) aged between 19 and 26. The proposed approach proves its robustness against inter- and intra-, subjects and raters’ scorings, variability. The agreement with human raters is rated overall from substantial to excellent and provides a significantly more reliable method than between human raters. Existing methods detect only specific artifacts or only arousals, and/or these methods are validated on short episodes of sleep recordings, making it difficult to compare with our whole night results. The method works on a whole night recording and is fully automatic, reproducible, and reliable. Furthermore the implementation of the method will be made available online as open source code. [less ▲]

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See detailCircadian and homeostatic sleep pressure modulate fMRI correlates of vigilant attention
Muto, Vincenzo ULg; Jaspar, Mathieu ULg; Meyer, C et al

in Journal of Sleep Research (2016), 25(s1),

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See detailThe effect of napping on the consolidation of explicit and implicit information
van Schalkwijk, F J; Heib, D P J; Hoedlmoser, K et al

in Journal of Sleep Research (2016), 25(s1),

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See detailSeasonality in human cognitive brain responses.
Meyer, Christelle ULg; Muto, Vincenzo ULg; Jaspar, Mathieu ULg et al

Poster (2015, September 04)

Detailed reference viewed: 196 (11 ULg)
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See detailHuman cortical excitability depends on time awake and circadian phase
Gaggioni, Giulia ULg; Ly, Julien; Chellappa, Sarah Laxhmi ULg et al

Poster (2015, January 27)

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See detailAutomatic artifact detection for whole-night polysomnographic sleep recordings
Coppieters't Wallant, Dorothe ULg; Chellappa, Sarah Laxhmi ULg; Gaggioni, Giulia ULg et al

Poster (2014, September 17)

Detecting of bad channels and artifacts for whole-night polysomnographic recordings is very time consuming and tedious. We therefore developed an automatic procedure to automatize this job.

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See detailAutomatic biorythms description from actigraphic data
González y Viagas, Miguel ULg; Ly, Julien ULg; Gaggioni, Giulia ULg et al

Poster (2014, September)

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See detailInfluence of noise correction on intra- and inter-subject variability of quantitative metrics in diffusion kurtosis imaging
André, Elodie ULg; Grinberg, Farida; Farrher, Ezequiel et al

in PLoS ONE (2014)

Diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) is a promising extension of diffusion tensor imaging, giving new insights into the white matter microstructure and providing new biomarkers. Given the rapidly increasing ... [more ▼]

Diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) is a promising extension of diffusion tensor imaging, giving new insights into the white matter microstructure and providing new biomarkers. Given the rapidly increasing number of studies, DKI has a potential to establish itself as a valuable tool in brain diagnostics. However, to become a routine procedure, DKI still needs to be improved in terms of robustness, reliability, and reproducibility. As it requires acquisitions at higher diffusion31 weightings, results are more affected by noise than in diffusion tensor imaging. The lack of standard procedures for post-processing, especially for noise correction, might become a significant obstacle for the use of DKI in clinical routine limiting its application. We considered two noise correction schemes accounting for the noise properties of multichannel phased-array coils, in order to improve the data quality at signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) typical for DKI. The SNR dependence of estimated DKI metrics such as mean kurtosis (MK), mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA) is investigated for these noise correction approaches in Monte Carlo simulations and in in vivo human studies. The intra-subject reproducibility is investigated in a single subject study by varying the SNR level and SNR spatial distribution. Then the impact of the noise correction on inter-subject variability is evaluated in a homogeneous sample of 25 healthy volunteers. Results show a strong impact of noise correction on the MK estimate, while the estimation of FA and MD was affected to a lesser extent. Both intra- and inter-subject SNR related variability of the MK estimate is considerably reduced after correction for the noise bias, providing more accurate and reproducible measures. In this work, we have proposed a straightforward method that improves accuracy of DKI metrics. This should contribute to standardization of DKI applications in clinical studies and making valuable inferences in group analysis and longitudinal studies. [less ▲]

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See detailSleep loss changes executive brain responses in the wake maintenance zone
Jaspar, Mathieu ULg; Meyer, Christelle ULg; Muto, Vincenzo ULg et al

Conference (2014)

Objectives:Brain mechanisms underlying executive processes are regulated by circadian and sleep homeostatic processes. Furthermore, during sleep deprivation (SD), cognitive performance and neural ... [more ▼]

Objectives:Brain mechanisms underlying executive processes are regulated by circadian and sleep homeostatic processes. Furthermore, during sleep deprivation (SD), cognitive performance and neural responses are differentially modulated by a clock gene PERIOD3 polymorphism. Here, we investigated interindividual differences on executive brain responses under SD. Critically, we focused on the circadian evening wake maintenance zone (WMZ), a key time-point for sleep-wake regulation. Methods:Thirty healthy young volunteers, genotyped for the PER3 polymorphism (10 PER3 5/5;20 PER3 4/4 homozygotes), underwent42-h SD under constant routine conditions. They performed a 3-back working memorytask in 13successivefMRI sessions. To compare neural activity in the WMZ before and during SD, sessions were realigned according to individual dim light melatonin onset. Results:We tested for a group (PER3 5/5>PER3 4/4) by session effect (WMZ before vs. during SD). From the first evening WMZ(i.e. during a normal waking day) to the second (i.e. following 40h of continuous waking), PER3 5/5 individuals relative toPER3 4/4 showed significantly larger increase in responsesin the left mid-cingulate, bilateral precuneus and thalamus. Interestingly, these regions are involved in executive processes and arousal regulation (thalamus). Conclusions:These results show that the strong circadian wake-maintenance signal depends on sleep pressure, in a PER3-genotype dependent manner. Interestingly, pronounced genotype differences wereobserved in the thalamus, an area that compensates potential lower cortical activity under SD. [less ▲]

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See detailSleep loss changes executive brain responses in the wake maintenance zone
Jaspar, Mathieu ULg; Meyer, Christelle ULg; Muto, Vincenzo ULg et al

in Journal of Sleep Research (2014), 23(1), 61

Objectives: Brain mechanisms underlying executive processes are regulated by circadian and sleep homeostatic processes. Furthermore, during sleep deprivation (SD), cognitive performance and neural ... [more ▼]

Objectives: Brain mechanisms underlying executive processes are regulated by circadian and sleep homeostatic processes. Furthermore, during sleep deprivation (SD), cognitive performance and neural responses are differentially modulated by a clock gene PERIOD3 polymorphism. Here, we investigated interindividual differences on executive brain responses under SD. Critically, we focused on the circadian evening wake maintenance zone (WMZ), a key time-point for sleep-wake regulation. Methods: Thirty healthy young volunteers, genotyped for the PER3 polymorphism (10 PER3 5/5; 20 PER3 4/4 homozygotes), underwent 42-h SD under constant routine conditions. They performed a 3-back working memory task in 13 successive fMRI sessions. To compare neural activity in the WMZ before and during SD, sessions were realigned according to individual dim light melatonin onset. Results: We tested for a group (PER3 5/5 > PER3 4/4) by session effect (WMZ before vs. during SD). From the fi rst evening WMZ (i.e. during a normal waking day) to the second (i.e. following 40 h of continuous waking), PER3 5/5 individuals relative to PER3 4/4 showed significantly larger increase in responses in the left mid-cingulate, bilateral precuneus and thalamus. Interestingly, these regions are involved in executive processes and arousal regulation (thalamus). Conclusions: These results show that the strong circadian wake-maintenance signal depends on sleep pressure, in a PER3-genotype dependent manner. Interestingly, pronounced genotype differences were observed in the thalamus, an area that compensates potential lower cortical activity under SD. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 40 (10 ULg)