References of "Munos, Delphine"
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See detailFrom "The Stranger" to "The Outsider": The different English translations of "L'Etranger", the Postcolonial, and the Memorialization of Camus in Post-Imperial France
Munos, Delphine ULg

in Misrahi-Barak, Judith; Devi, Srilata (Eds.) Translating the Postcolonial (in press)

A French writer born on North African soil and a pied-noir who opposed both the O.A.S. and the F.L.N., Albert Camus has always enjoyed a problematic status in post-imperial France, a country where the ... [more ▼]

A French writer born on North African soil and a pied-noir who opposed both the O.A.S. and the F.L.N., Albert Camus has always enjoyed a problematic status in post-imperial France, a country where the taboos surrounding the Algerian War have been kept alive by left- and right-wingers alike. While on the one hand right-wing French politicians have recurrently appealed to Pied-Noir ‘nostalgéria’ to justify their stubborn stance of non-repentance as regards the 130 years of colonization in Algeria, on the other, influential left-wing figures, such as Pierre Nora, have participated in a climate of intellectual atrophy by joining what British historian Perry Anderson has recently called “union sucrée,” that is, sugar-coated, and self-indulgent, versions of France and its colonial past. The difficult, even impossible, memorialization of Camus and his work in today’s France was evidenced again on the eve of the writer’s centenary. In 2012, the project of a major Camus exhibition in Aix-en-Provence for Marseille-Provence European Capital of Culture 2013 was stalled, following on the brutal eviction of its curator, French Algeria historian Benjamin Stora, by arch-conservative Aix-en-Provence mayor Maryse Joissains-Masini. Certainly, the subsequent absence of official celebrations in France surrounding Camus’ 100th birthday implied that the specificity of Camus’ liberal pied-noir voice would still remain silenced there for quite some time. But it also gave new momentum to U.S. historian Todd Shepard’s suggestion that the all-too-easy conflation of ‘pied-noir’ and ‘right-wing extremist’ (which has been dominant in France since the start of the Fifth Republic, at times correctly so) has helped naturalize the construction of some post-imperial ‘all-good-again’ Frenchness, in particular maintain the comforting belief that the “‘Algerian experience’ had been an unfortunate colonial detour, from which the French Republic had now escaped” (The Invention of Decolonization, 11). Can it be that Camus’s heritage is a “burning” one (cf. Stora’s Camus brûlant (2013)) because the irreconcilability of his work and commitments with the utilitarian image of the pied noir extrémiste would reveal the extent to which today’s France is dependent on this same image to keep the memory of its own involvement in colonialism at bay? This question constitutes the starting point of my discussion of Sandra Smith’s new translation of L’Etranger (2013), which appeared in the same year as two other books also inviting us to reconsider the actuality of Camus’ Algerian legacy from a non-French perspective – namely Kamel Daoud’s Meursault, contre-enquête, a retelling of Camus’ classic which was published in Algeria, and Arthur Goldhammer’s translation, for the first time in English, of Camus’s Algerian Chronicles, which offers the writer’s final word on the Algerian question. Taking my cue from Mona Baker, who argues that “translators […] play a crucial role in both disseminating and contesting public narratives with and across national boundaries” (Translation and Conflict, 4-5), I intend to contextualize Smith’s new translation of Camus’s classic within a broader frame of contemporary attempts at problematizing the strategic pigeonholing of Camus as colonialist, decades after Edward Said’s pronouncement that The Stranger was informed by an “incapacitated colonial sensibility” (Culture and Imperialism, 176). Lawrence Venutti has argued that “the intertextual and interdiscursive relations that a translation establishes are not merely interpretative, but also potentially interrogative” (Translation Changes Everything 182). My hypothesis is that Smith’s translation strategy, which includes the re-humanization of Meursault, creates a web of new meanings that participate in opening a space through which Camus’ anti-hero can be seen both as an outsider and an insider to French Algeria – a space that might reach backward and forward, with a potential for complicating the pieties of post-imperial France. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Mother/Daughter Plot in the Work of Jhumpa Lahiri
Munos, Delphine ULg

in Hegde, Radha S.; Sahoo, Ajaya K. (Eds.) The Routledge Handbook of the Indian Diaspora (in press)

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See detailM.G. Vassanji’s A Place Within: Thinking through India, Transnationally: Still Writing from a Hard Place?
Munos, Delphine ULg

in Sayed, Asma; Murji, Karim (Eds.) Diaspora and Literary Politics: The Transnational Imaginaries of MG Vassanji (in press)

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See detailReview of M.G. Vassanji: Essays on His Works (edited by Asma Sayed)
Munos, Delphine ULg

in South Asian Diaspora (2016), online

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See detailIndo-Trinidadian Women and the Indian Public Sphere: Women under the Influence?
Munos, Delphine ULg

Conference (2016, January 06)

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See detailJamaica Kincaid's A Small Place
Munos, Delphine ULg

in Helen Goethals (Ed.) A Companion to Commonwealth Studies: Cultural Relations since 1884 (2016)

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See detailIdentités et stéréotypes postcoloniaux
Dony, Christophe ULg; Ledent, Bénédicte ULg; Munos, Delphine ULg et al

Conference given outside the academic context (2015)

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See detailReview of Transnational Migration
Munos, Delphine ULg

in South Asian Diaspora (2015), 7(1), 63-65

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See detailDu Bengale à la Nouvelle Angleterre (en passant par l'Inde): Trajectoires transnationales et mémores transrégionales dans The Lowland, de Jhumpa Lahiri
Munos, Delphine ULg

Conference (2014, January 31)

Comme son titre le suggère déjà, le dernier roman de l’auteur bengali-américain Jhumpa Lahiri, The Lowland (« La Basse Terre »), traite moins de la vie d’hommes et de femmes qu’il ne parle d’espace et de ... [more ▼]

Comme son titre le suggère déjà, le dernier roman de l’auteur bengali-américain Jhumpa Lahiri, The Lowland (« La Basse Terre »), traite moins de la vie d’hommes et de femmes qu’il ne parle d’espace et de géographie, et plus particulièrement, de la façon dont certains paysages peuvent se substituer à l’Histoire, quand cette dernière n’arrive plus à ‘porter’ ses zones d’ombre, ses propres impensés. Comme son titre ne l’indique pas, cette fois, The Lowland prend pour sujet les répercussions de l’Indépendance indienne, à Calcutta et au-delà, à travers les destinées entrecroisées de deux frères, Udayan et Subhash – le premier qui embrasse la révolution armée d’obédience maoïste et la cause des Naxalites, avec des conséquences dramatiques, le deuxième qui choisit de s’exiler aux Etats-Unis pour ses études, moins par ambition personnelle ou en raison de la grande instabilité politique de Calcutta dans les années 60 et 70, d’ailleurs, que pour enfin se donner le droit de rivaliser d’audace avec son frère cadet. <br />Si j’ai choisi The Lowland pour aborder le sujet des enjeux esthétiques et spirituels de la commémoration, c’est justement parce que dans le dernier roman de Lahiri (paru en septembre 2013 et non encore traduit en français), la thématique historique est omniprésente, bien qu’elle reste en sourdine, perpétuellement soumise à une esthétique du détour, du déplacement, et du non-dit, qui trouvera son apogée (et, pour Subhash, une certaine forme de rédemption spirituelle) dans ce que l’on pourrait appeler l’émergence d’une topographie transnationale – et bien plus, transrégionale – de l’impensé historique. [less ▲]

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See detailMapping Diasporic Subjectivities
Munos, Delphine ULg; Pandurang, Mala

in South Asian Diaspora (2014), 6(1),

The last two decades have witnessed a growing interest in theorizing literary narratives that address the South Asian diasporic experience. By and large, however, what has emerged is an academic consensus ... [more ▼]

The last two decades have witnessed a growing interest in theorizing literary narratives that address the South Asian diasporic experience. By and large, however, what has emerged is an academic consensus which accords an ever-greater visibility to mainstream diasporic voices from North America, U.K., some parts of Africa and of the Caribbean, at the expense of narratives dealing with South Asian diasporic communities that are based in other locations. Also, such critical consensus valorizes certain class-streamed patterns of migration over others, with the result of homogenizing the diversity of today’s South Asian diaspora. This special issue explores literary representations of the migrant experiences of those underrepresented South Asian communities based in locations such as South America, East Europe, the Gulf, West Africa and East Asia. [less ▲]

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See detailIntroduction to Mapping Diasporic Subjectivities
Munos, Delphine ULg; Pandurang, Mala

in South Asian Diaspora (2014), 6(1), 1-5

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See detailPerte fantome et refiguration de la subjectivité diasporique de la seconde génération dans l'oeuvre de Jhumpa Lahiri
Munos, Delphine ULg

Scientific conference (2013, December 13)

Dans « Unaccustomed Earth » (« Sur une terre étrangère »), son dernier livre, et en particulier dans «Hema and Kaushik », la trilogie qui constitue la deuxième partie de ce recueil de nouvelles ... [more ▼]

Dans « Unaccustomed Earth » (« Sur une terre étrangère »), son dernier livre, et en particulier dans «Hema and Kaushik », la trilogie qui constitue la deuxième partie de ce recueil de nouvelles, l’écrivain bengali-américain Jhumpa Lahiri aborde l’installation de la seconde génération indo-américaine dans l’âge adulte en interrogeant les notions stéréotypées de transmission et d’héritage. Ma recherche doctorale (et la monographie qui en est tirée), partent du postulat que, contrairement aux théories d’hybridité culturelle selon lesquelles la seconde génération est définie par sa propensité à hériter du ‘meilleur des deux mondes’, pour Lahiri, ce qui est transmis d’une génération à l’autre a davantage à voir avec le négatif, qu’avec le positif, c'est-à-dire, avec les catégories du creux, de l’absence, et du non-dit – en bref avec la ‘perte fantôme’ hantant les rapports intergénérationnels. Durant cette matinée, je présenterai les différentes étapes de ma lecture critique de « Hema and Kaushik », qui sont jalonnées par des approches complémentaires empruntant principalement à la psychanalyse, au concept de ‘post-memory’ (Marianne Hirsch), et au gothique. [less ▲]

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See detailKiss Me, I'm Jewish : Sarah Glidden ramène la balle au centre
Munos, Delphine ULg

Article for general public (2013)

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See detailM.G. Vassanji’s A Place Within: Thinking through India, Transnationally
Munos, Delphine ULg

Conference (2013, November 10)

In their groundbreaking collection, Minor Transnationalism, Françoise Lionnet and Shu-mei Shih advocate a new approach to transnationalism, which, by shifting the ground of analysis to “transversal” ... [more ▼]

In their groundbreaking collection, Minor Transnationalism, Françoise Lionnet and Shu-mei Shih advocate a new approach to transnationalism, which, by shifting the ground of analysis to “transversal” movements of culture, departs from existing theoretical frameworks and allows for the emergence of “minor-to-minor networks” (8) that have the potential to circumvent the major altogether. Lionnet’s and Shih’s understanding of transnationalism not in terms of vertical relations between center and margin, but in terms of cultural transversalism, is particularly apt in the context of MG Vassanji’s writings, notably because his books often complicate those hackneyed notions of hybridity constructing Western locales as the privileged sites of plurality. In this paper, my contention is that Lionnet’s and Shih’s concept of ‘minor transnationalism’ also proves useful to deconstruct the discourse of ‘dominant’ Western-based diasporas that style themselves as “the legitimate archive with which to explore diasporic subjectivities” (Vijay Mishra, 3) — such as the hyper-visible ‘new’ Indian diaspora of global capital. Taking its cue from Lionnet’s and Shih’s concept of minor transnationalism, this paper looks at A Place Within (2008), the memoir of Vassanji’s travels across the land of his ancestors over two decades, with a view to showing how the author’s positionality as a ‘minor’ transnational (i.e. as a Canadian writer of Indian descent born on East-African soil) gives a new twist to the now-classic ‘return to the Indian homeland’ narrative — a staple, indeed, of the enormously popular Indian diasporic literature. At stake is the contention that Vassanji’s own brand of ‘minor transnationalism’ allows for a unique descent into the messiness of India, the ‘slippery’ nature of its past — well beyond diaspora’s dubious politics of retrieval and its investment in purist readings of the Indian homeland [less ▲]

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See detailOgling Jhumpa Lahiri at Southbank
Munos, Delphine ULg

Article for general public (2013)

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See detailHolocaust postmemory and the legacy of un-death in Nicole Krauss’ Great House
Munos, Delphine ULg

Conference (2013, October 03)

In an interview closely following on the release of The History of Love, Krauss made it clear that, contrary to what some critics had ventured, her second novel was not about Holocaust survivors. “I am ... [more ▼]

In an interview closely following on the release of The History of Love, Krauss made it clear that, contrary to what some critics had ventured, her second novel was not about Holocaust survivors. “I am the grandchild of people who survived that historical event,” Krauss pointed out. “I’m not writing their story – I couldn’t write their story […]. What interests me is the response to catastrophic loss.” Great House, Krauss’s third novel, can be seen to further investigate this “response to catastrophic loss” – in a way which makes only tangential and mediated references to the Holocaust. The novel spans eighty years, starting from the near-end of World War 2, and traces the passing-on of a desk of massive proportions. Complete with nineteen drawers, one of which remains locked until it is symbolically revealed to be empty at the close of the book, the desk operates as some kind of trans-historical fetish for most of its successive keepers (and aspiring acquirers). Narrated through a set of five characters whose lives prove overshadowed less by the Holocaust itself than by its felt resonances in the psyches of loved ones, Great House is a polyphonic work that raises questions about the anatomy of ‘Holocaust postmemory’ (Marianne Hirsch), its temporality, but also its reification in conformity with defense mechanisms that take the form of death-denying fantasies. Here, while turning to the past, some clearly unreliable first-person narrators reveal their lifelong investment in fetishizing memories of themselves and others so as to better keep all sense of temporality and mortality at bay – in a way suggesting that fantasies of un-death have helped them fill in the gap left by the unspeakable horror of the Holocaust, and were later transmitted in lieu of ‘memory proper’. This paper will thus focus on Great House’s rich imagery, and its narrative strategies, in order to investigate Krauss’ representation of the paradoxes of Holocaust postmemory. [less ▲]

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See detailOf ‘Cyber-Coolies’ and Globalized India: Representing the Cosmos of Call-Centers in Films from the Subcontinent and Abroad
Munos, Delphine ULg

Conference (2013, May 09)

In today’s globalized India, not only has the outsourcing sector generated employment for some two million people, but it has also promoted the mesmerizing idea of a ‘new India’ of foreign investment ... [more ▼]

In today’s globalized India, not only has the outsourcing sector generated employment for some two million people, but it has also promoted the mesmerizing idea of a ‘new India’ of foreign investment, global markets, economic growth and expanding middle class. Drawing its workforce from an urban, college-educated Indian youth who receive training in ‘accent neutralization,’ the call centre industry offers the hope of rapid upward mobility, even if this involves working grinding shifts and faking an American name, accent, location, and time-zone. As against the somewhat cultish belief that ‘pretend-Nancy’ or ‘pretend-Bill’ (Susan Sontag) can reap the benefits of the corporate search for cut-rate labor, critics such as Harish Trivedi and Siddhartha Deb have proved highly critical of the ways in which the call centre industry results in creating a generation of ‘cyber-coolies’ and cultural emulators. A “public spectacle,” in Shehzad Nadeem’s words, outsourcing can be seen to promote an Indian fantasy landscape of high tech, virtual lives, and consumer culture that is reproduced and/or resisted in a growing number of cultural productions. Investigating TV series (Outsourced, Mumbai Calling), blockbusters (Slumdog Millionaire, The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel), and documentaries (John and Jane Toll-Free, Bombay Calling), this paper will explore the cosmos of call centres from a cross-cultural perspective. [less ▲]

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