References of "Moyse, Evelyne"
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See detailFunctional connectivity and recognition of familiar faces in Alzheimer’s disease
Kurth, Sophie ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Moyse, Evelyne ULg et al

in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience (2014)

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See detailAge Estimation from Faces and Voices: A Review
Moyse, Evelyne ULg

in Psychologica Belgica (2014), 54(3), 255-265

Age estimation is a skill that we use in everyday life and that is also important in more specific settings such as police testimony. Researchers investigated age estimation either from faces or voices ... [more ▼]

Age estimation is a skill that we use in everyday life and that is also important in more specific settings such as police testimony. Researchers investigated age estimation either from faces or voices but a direct comparison between voices and faces was rather infrequently performed. This paper reviews the literature on age estimation from faces and voices and highlights some similarities and differences. Data from a series of experiments suggest that age estimation from faces and voices can be fairly accurate, but in some cases, a superiority of faces is observed. The age of participants and stimuli both seem to affect age estimation from faces and voices in the same way: (1) age estimation is more accurate for young stimuli than for older stimuli, (2) younger participants are more accurate than older participants irrespective of the age of stimuli, and (3) an own-age bias affects age estimation. By contrast, the influence of ethnicity and gender has been less documented. Available data support that ethnicity influence age estimation from faces but not clearly age estimation from voices. Regarding the effect of stimuli gender, results were opposite: in age estimation from faces, an advantage for male faces was reported whereas in age estimation from voices, the advantage is in favor of female voices. [less ▲]

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See detailEvidence for an own-age bias in age estimation from voices in older persons
Moyse, Evelyne ULg; Beaufort, Aline ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg

in European Journal of Ageing (2014)

Previous studies have investigated the effect of ageing on age estimation from faces as well as the occur- rence of an own-age bias in such age estimation from faces. To the best of our knowledge, the ... [more ▼]

Previous studies have investigated the effect of ageing on age estimation from faces as well as the occur- rence of an own-age bias in such age estimation from faces. To the best of our knowledge, the occurrence of an own age effect on age estimation from voices has never been examined earlier using an experimental design in which the age of participants (young vs. old) and the age of voice stimuli (young vs. old) were crossed. Results revealed an own-age bias in older adults only. In comparison with younger adults, older participants showed age estimation abilities that are preserved for voices from their own age group and impaired for younger voices. This own age bias was absent in younger participants. [less ▲]

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See detailAge estimation from faces in Alzheimer disease
Moyse, Evelyne ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg; Salmon, Eric ULg et al

Poster (2013, July)

Although studies on age estimation showed that the performance of estimation is fairly accurate, this performance can be influenced by group biases such as the own-age bias (George & Hole, 1995). Moreover ... [more ▼]

Although studies on age estimation showed that the performance of estimation is fairly accurate, this performance can be influenced by group biases such as the own-age bias (George & Hole, 1995). Moreover this bias occurs both in young and older adults (Moyse & Brédart, 2012). Because difficulties in face processing have been reported in Alzheimer disease (Della Sala et al., 1995), the aim of this study was to examine the performance of age estimation from faces in patients with Alzheimer disease (mild to moderate) compared with normal aging persons. Moreover to test the preservation of the occurrence of an own-age bias, stimuli belonging to different age groups (young, middle age and older adults) were used. We observed a main effect of Group indicating that patients were less accurate than control whatever the age of faces. In addition a main effect of Age of faces was obtained; the percentage of accuracy was better for older faces than for the two other age groups of faces. Consequently although patients’ performance in age estimation of faces is impaired, an own-age bias was still present. These results have two main interests: a clinical interest (expanding the diagnostic criteria of the Alzheimer disease) and a forensic interest (assessing the credibility of eyewitness testimony in older adults with a possible Alzheimer disease). [less ▲]

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See detailThe own-age bias in age estimation of voices
Beaufort, Aline ULg; Moyse, Evelyne ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg

Poster (2012, May)

Recently, it has been evidenced that age estimation performance may be influenced by an own-age bias, i.e. we can estimate more accurately the age of one’s own-age people than the age of other age people ... [more ▼]

Recently, it has been evidenced that age estimation performance may be influenced by an own-age bias, i.e. we can estimate more accurately the age of one’s own-age people than the age of other age people (George & Hole, 1995). To the best of our knowledge, all the studies that investigated the own-age bias used faces as stimuli. However, there are situations in which the voice is the only information available in order to estimate a person’s age (Cerrato et al., 2000). In the present study, the occurrence of an own-age bias in age estimation from voices was assessed by using an experimental design in which the age of participants (young vs old people) and the age of face stimuli (young vs old people) are crossed. Although we did not observe a crossed interaction where each age group would have been more accurate for in-group estimation than for out-group estimation, present results revealed the occurrence of an own-age bias in age estimation in younger adults only. Indeed young participants made smaller absolute errors than older participants when estimating the age of young voices. However, there was no significant difference between age groups when the age of older voices was estimated. [less ▲]

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See detailAn own-age bias in age estimation of faces
Moyse, Evelyne ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg

in European Review of Applied Psychology = Revue Européenne de Psychologie Appliquée (2012), 62(1), 3-7

Introduction. - Age estimation performances may be influenced by group biases. Objective. - This study investigated whether we are more accurate at estimating the age of people from one's own-age than the ... [more ▼]

Introduction. - Age estimation performances may be influenced by group biases. Objective. - This study investigated whether we are more accurate at estimating the age of people from one's own-age than the age of younger or older people. Method. - Children, young and older adults’ performances at estimating both in-group and out-group faces were compared. Results. - A significant “Age of participants” × “Age of face stimuli” interaction was revealed. Moreover, the age of children's faces was more accurately estimated than the age of young and older adults’ faces by the three groups of participants. Conclusion. - The present results revealed the occurrence of an own-age bias for children, young and older adults in age estimation. Several explanations to this own-age effect are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailDo you sound or look as old as you are? A study of age estimation in young and older adults
Moyse, Evelyne ULg; Beaufort, Aline ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg

in Perception (2012), 41(supplement), 117

Studies on age estimation usually indicated that people are fairly accurate at estimating the age of a person from her/his face or from her/his voice (with an absolute difference of five and ten years ... [more ▼]

Studies on age estimation usually indicated that people are fairly accurate at estimating the age of a person from her/his face or from her/his voice (with an absolute difference of five and ten years respectively) [e.g. Amilon et al., 2000, in: Speaker Classification II. Lectures Notes in Artificial Intelligence, C Müller, Berlin, Springer-Verlag]. However studies showed also that performance depends on the age of participants and the age of stimuli [Rhodes, 2009, Applied Cognitive Psychology, 23, 1-12; Braun, 1996, Forensic Linguistics, 3, 65-73]. The aim of the present study is to compare age estimation performance from faces and voices by using an experimental design in which the age of participants (young vs older), the age of stimuli (young vs older) and the stimulus domain (face vs voice) were crossed. Overall, the age of faces was more accurately estimated than the age of voices. Moreover performance of age estimation was better for young stimuli than for older stimuli. Finally, young participants made smaller absolute errors than older participants. However there is no difference between young and older participants when estimating the age of older stimuli. [less ▲]

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See detailThe "other-age" effect in age estimation of faces
Moyse, Evelyne ULg; Manard, Marine ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg

Poster (2011, May 27)

In this study the occurrence of an “other-age” effect on age estimation was assessed. This effect consists in a more accurate estimation of own-age faces than other-age faces. Here, the age of ... [more ▼]

In this study the occurrence of an “other-age” effect on age estimation was assessed. This effect consists in a more accurate estimation of own-age faces than other-age faces. Here, the age of participants (10 to 14 year old children and 20 to 30 year old adults) and the age of stimuli (faces of 10 to 14 year old children and faces of 20 to 30 year old adults) were crossed. Although we did not observe a crossed interaction where each age group would have been more accurate for in-group estimation than for out-group estimation, present results revealed the occurrence of an own-age bias in age estimation. Although both groups did not differ when estimating child faces, adults were more accurate than children when estimating the age of adult faces. Therefore, the present results showed an asymmetrical "other-age" effect. Several hypotheses explaining the present pattern of results are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailAn own-age bias in age estimation of faces in children and adults.
Moyse, Evelyne ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg

in Perception (2010), 39(suppl), 93

The aim of the present study was to assess the occurence of an own-age bias on age estimation performance (better performance for faces from the same age range as that of the beholder) by using an ... [more ▼]

The aim of the present study was to assess the occurence of an own-age bias on age estimation performance (better performance for faces from the same age range as that of the beholder) by using an experimental design inspired from research on the own-race effect. The age of participants (10 to 14 year old children and 20 to 30 year old adults) was an independent factor that was crossed with the age of the stimuli (faces of 10 to 14 year old children and faces of 20 to 30 year old adults), the dependent measure being the accuracy of age estimation. There were 30 participants in each age group. An interaction between the two factors was expected. A two-way 2 (age of the participants)x 2 (age of the stimuli) ANOVA with repeated measures on the last factor was carried out on the accuracy scores. This analysis revealed a main effect of age of participants and of age of stimuli, and an interaction between these two factors. Children's performance was less accurate when estimating the age of adults' faces compared with children's faces. However, in both age groups, accuracy was better for children's faces than for adults' faces. [less ▲]

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