References of "Mostert, Martine"
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See detailIntermodal transport: does a wider definition improve its competitiveness?
Mostert, Martine ULg; Limbourg, Sabine ULg; Caris, An

Conference (2017, June)

With the opening of borders and always greater decentralization of production, freight transport increased a lot in the last decades. Road remains the most used mode in Europe (Eurostat, 2016). Even if it ... [more ▼]

With the opening of borders and always greater decentralization of production, freight transport increased a lot in the last decades. Road remains the most used mode in Europe (Eurostat, 2016). Even if it is appreciated for its responsiveness, flexibility, and quickness, road transport is however responsible for negative impacts on its environment like air pollution or climate change. Intermodal freight transport i.e. the transportation of goods using two or more modes of transport, in the same loading unit, without handling of the goods themselves (United Nations, 2001) is identified by the European Commission (2011) as an interesting solution for limiting the negative impacts of transport. In the classical conception of intermodal transport, pre- and post-haulage travels are supposed to be short, and to be performed by road transport, whereas the long-haul travel is done using rail or IWW. The combination of these modes allows reducing the negative externalities of the whole travel, i.e. the negative impacts that are generated by transport operators, but which are not directly supported by them. These externalities in particular consist in air pollution and climate change, provoked by the release of emissions which lead to air pollution and human health problems. The objective of this study is to determine the impact on intermodal attractiveness of allowing other combinations of modes than the classical road-rail/IWW-road combination, during an intermodal travel. The research is based on tools of the operations research domain and proposes the development of an allocation model for freight transport at the strategic level of decision. The goal is to determine the flow distribution of goods between direct transportation by road, rail or inland waterways, and any combination of these modes using intermodal transport. The novelty consists in taking into account three modes of transport in a mixed integer programming model, and to allow the transfer from any mode to any other at intermodal terminals where these modes coexist. [less ▲]

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See detailDesign and Management of Freight Transport Networks: Intermodal Transport and Externalities
Mostert, Martine ULg

Doctoral thesis (2017)

Transportation of goods contributes to the economic development of societies but it generates negative impacts on its environment called negative externalities. In its White Paper on Transport, the ... [more ▼]

Transportation of goods contributes to the economic development of societies but it generates negative impacts on its environment called negative externalities. In its White Paper on Transport, the European Commission encourages the flow transfer from road to more environmentally friendly modes like rail or inland waterways (IWW). This objective can be reached by the development of intermodal transport. A literature review on transport externalities and their valorization methods highlights the small number of studies related to the general modeling of transport externalities through dedicated mathematical formulas. However, the latter are important for identifying the key parameters that influence transport competitiveness in terms of externalities. This is demonstrated by analyzing two external cost functions for road and rail. The location of intermodal terminals stands out from the environmental perspective as one of the most important competitiveness factors of intermodal transport regarding road. An innovative mathematical model for the location of terminals and allocation of flows between road and intermodal rail and IWW transport is developed. The model is based on a bi-objective formulation which evaluates the trade-offs between transport operational costs and CO2 emissions. Economies of scale of intermodal transport are integrated. The model is applied to the Belgian network. Results indicate that terminal locations are relatively stable, whatever the optimized economic or environmental objective. The type of terminal located changes according to the followed strategy. Minimizing CO2 emissions leads to an increased use of intermodal transport. The impact of transport on air pollution is also evaluated. On the Belgian case, an economic optimization of transport operational costs is compared to an environmental optimization of transport air pollution external costs. The intervention of public authorities through a taxation policy for trucks is also studied. Results show that the introduction of road taxes leads to a more intensive use of intermodal transport than in the absence of taxes. The maximum intermodal market share is observed when air pollution external costs are minimized. Finally, a new model which considers other intermodal chains than the traditional “road-rail/IWW-road” modeling is applied on experimental data at the European level. The model allows to choose between any direct transport by one mode (road, rail or IWW), and any intermodal transport of up to three modes. Results indicate that several connections may benefit from the use of other combinations of modes than the “road-rail/IWW-road” combination. [less ▲]

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See detailCan any possible combination of modes improve intermodal attractiveness?
Mostert, Martine ULg; Caris, An; Limbourg, Sabine ULg

in Proceedings of the BIVEC-GIBET Transport Research Days 2017 (2017, May)

In its White Paper on Transport, the European Commission recognizes intermodal transport as an alternative solution to road transport. In practice, intermodal transport can be constituted by any ... [more ▼]

In its White Paper on Transport, the European Commission recognizes intermodal transport as an alternative solution to road transport. In practice, intermodal transport can be constituted by any combination of modes, while in the literature, intermodal transport is often modeled as a combination of modes in the order “road-rail/inland waterway-road”. This work develops a new intermodal allocation model which allows choosing between any direct (road, rail and inland waterways) transport and any intermodal transport chain constituted by up to three modes of transport. Intermodal solutions can pass through one or two intermodal terminals. Applied on experimental data at the European level, the model gives insight on the optimal flow distribution for economic objectives (optimization of transport operational costs) and environmental objectives (optimization of transport CO2 emissions and air pollution external costs). Results highlight that the traditional modeling of intermodal transport as a “road-rail/inland waterway-road” combination better fits economic than environmental objectives. [less ▲]

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See detailRoad and intermodal transport performance: the impact of operational costs and air pollution external costs
Mostert, Martine ULg; Caris, An; Limbourg, Sabine ULg

in Research in Transportation Business & Management (2017)

The transportation of goods is essential for the economy, but it also contributes to air pollution which, in turn, affects human health. These negative impacts generate additional costs for society that ... [more ▼]

The transportation of goods is essential for the economy, but it also contributes to air pollution which, in turn, affects human health. These negative impacts generate additional costs for society that are not necessarily taken into account in public transportation policies and in private transportation decisions of companies and individuals. This leads to inefficient transportation systems where the social equilibrium is not reached. Intermodal transport is promoted by the European Commission to reduce these negative externalities. The objective of this paper is to analyze at a strategic level the effect on modal split between road, intermodal rail and intermodal inland waterway transport of several economic or environmental policies. An intermodal allocation model is applied to the Belgian case in order to identify the modal split changes between the single minimization of costs (operational or health-related external) and the introduction of additional road taxes. [less ▲]

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See detailIntermodal network design: a three-mode bi-objective model applied to the case of Belgium
Mostert, Martine ULg; Caris, An; Limbourg, Sabine ULg

in Flexible Services and Manufacturing Journal (2017)

Freight transport planning is nowadays encouraged to align with environmental objectives. Among those, climate change is of particular interest for many countries. In its White Paper on Transport, the ... [more ▼]

Freight transport planning is nowadays encouraged to align with environmental objectives. Among those, climate change is of particular interest for many countries. In its White Paper on Transport, the European Commission considers intermodal transport as a potential solution for reducing environmental impacts. In order to make good strategic transport decisions, realistic decision support models for freight transport networks must be developed, so that insights can be derived for the different stakeholders of the transportation chain. This research proposes a bi-objective mathematical formulation which takes into account economic and environmental objectives, on a road and intermodal network with three modes of transport (road, intermodal rail, and intermodal inland waterways), and in which economies of scale of intermodal transport can be considered. With this model better fitting reality, an application to the Belgian case study provides practical information on how flows, terminal types and locations vary depending on the chosen policy, on the integration or not of economies of scale, on costs or emissions modifications and on the number of terminals to locate. Results show that the chosen policy influences the terminal type and the intermodal market share. The study also highlights the interest of intermodal transport on short distances, and the risk of flow exchanges inside the intermodal market share, rather than between road and intermodal transport. [less ▲]

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See detailOperational costs and externalities in optimal intermodal network design
Mostert, Martine ULg; Limbourg, Sabine ULg; Caris, An

Conference (2016, July 13)

Transportation of goods is essential for the economy but also leads to harmful impacts related to human health aspects. Intermodal transport is promoted by Europe to reduce these negative externalities ... [more ▼]

Transportation of goods is essential for the economy but also leads to harmful impacts related to human health aspects. Intermodal transport is promoted by Europe to reduce these negative externalities. The objective of this paper is to analyze at the strategic level how the flow repartition varies between three modes (road, intermodal rail and intermodal inland waterway) according to different implemented policies. A mathematical allocation model is developed and tested on the Belgian case study, in order to determine the observed changes between the single minimization of (operational or health-related external) costs and the introduction of additional road taxes. [less ▲]

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See detailBRAIN-TRAINS: Scenario development to explore intermodal rail transport expansion in, from and towards Belgium
Troch, Frank; Vanelslander, Thierry; Sys, Christa et al

Conference (2016, July)

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See detailExternal Costs as Competitiveness Factors for Freight Transport — A State of the Art
Mostert, Martine ULg; Limbourg, Sabine ULg

in Transport Reviews (2016), 36(6), 692-712

External costs have been a key issue in the last years of transport research. In Europe, this trend is in line with the political willingness to internalize externalities in transport pricing policies ... [more ▼]

External costs have been a key issue in the last years of transport research. In Europe, this trend is in line with the political willingness to internalize externalities in transport pricing policies. This paper has two purposes. It first identifies the recent work achieved in the field of external costs of road and intermodal freight transport, where each paper is assessed in terms of its perspective (academic or project oriented), its objective (prescription, application, projection), the type of externality (air pollution, climate change, noise, accidents, congestion) and the type of cost (marginal, average, total) that is considered. The literature review reveals a gap in the development of generic mathematical functions for external costs of transport. The second objective of the paper is thus to highlight the usefulness of such functions by identifying the main parameters that influence freight transport competitiveness in terms of external costs, and by determining which of these parameters should be incorporated in further research works. [less ▲]

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See detailBi-objective Road and Pipe Network Design for Crude Oil Transport in the Sfax Region in Tunisia
Belaid, Emna ULg; Limbourg, Sabine ULg; Mostert, Martine ULg et al

in Procedia Engineering (2016), 142

In this paper, we examine a bi-objective road and pipe network design for crude oil transport in the Sfax region in Tunisia. In particular, we search for the minimum spanning trees (MST) that connect the ... [more ▼]

In this paper, we examine a bi-objective road and pipe network design for crude oil transport in the Sfax region in Tunisia. In particular, we search for the minimum spanning trees (MST) that connect the different oil fields with the port of La Skhirra. In the determination of the minimum spanning trees, two objectives are taken into account, i.e. accident risk and construction costs. By using an improved ɛ-constraint resolution technique, the Pareto optimal combinations of risk and cost are found. Results indicate that the network solutions by pipe outperform the solutions by road. When the minimum spanning trees for the two extremes on the Pareto curves, i.e. the cost minimum and risk minimum, are compared, one could note considerable differences in the links that form the MST. This implies that policy makers have an important role in deliberating between costs and risks. [less ▲]

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See detailBrain trains: scenario development to explore intermodal rail transport expansion in, from and towards Belgium
Troch, Frank; Vanelslander, Thierry; Belboom, Sandra ULg et al

Conference (2015, September)

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See detailBrain Trains: Intermodal Rail Freight Transport and Hinterland Connections - A Swot Analysis to Assess the Belgian Rail Practice
Troch, Frank; Vanelslander, Thierry; Sys, Christa et al

in Proceedings of the IAME Annual Conference 2015 (2015, August)

This paper focuses on transversal research of the role and influences of rail freight transport, as a part of intermodal transport in Belgium. The scope of the research concentrates on port hinterland ... [more ▼]

This paper focuses on transversal research of the role and influences of rail freight transport, as a part of intermodal transport in Belgium. The scope of the research concentrates on port hinterland flows. A large SWOT analysis of the current situation is conducted, starting from the actual weak usage of this mode of transport. Five different fields have been identified, impacting the economy and society. Each field indicates critical internal strengths and weaknesses for intermodal rail transportation in Belgium, and identifies possible future developments and setbacks. A Delphi-like approach is used, including a heterogeneous panel of experts discussing and validating the SWOT results. To prioritize the characteristics, a survey on the different SWOT elements was performed, asking the experts to rate each statement on its influence and likelihood of happening (level of uncertainty). [less ▲]

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See detailBRAIN TRAINS: Intermodal rail freight transport and hinterland connections A SWOT analysis to assess the Belgian rail practice
Troch, Frank; Vanelslander, Thierry; Belboom, Sandra ULg et al

Scientific conference (2015, May)

This paper focuses on transversal research of the role and influences of rail freight transport, as a part of intermodal transport in Belgium. A SWOT analysis of the current situation is conducted ... [more ▼]

This paper focuses on transversal research of the role and influences of rail freight transport, as a part of intermodal transport in Belgium. A SWOT analysis of the current situation is conducted, starting from the actual weak usage of this mode of transport. Five different fields have been identified, impacting the economy and society. Each field indicates critical internal strengths and weaknesses for intermodal rail transportation in Belgium, and identifies possible future developments and setbacks. A Delphi-like approach is used, including a heterogeneous panel of experts, discussing and validating the SWOT results. To prioritize the characteristics, a survey on the different SWOT elements is performed, asking the experts to rate each statement on its influence and likelihood of happening, indicating the level of uncertainty. [less ▲]

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See detailA mixed integer nonlinear programming bi-objective model for intermodal network design
Mostert, Martine ULg; Caris, An; Limbourg, Sabine ULg

Conference (2015, February 05)

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See detailA bi-objective model for intermodal transport
Mostert, Martine ULg; Limbourg, Sabine ULg

in ILS 2014 Proceedings (2014, August)

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See detailA Bi-Objective Location-Allocation Model for Intermodal Terminals
Mostert, Martine ULg; Caris, An; Limbourg, Sabine ULg

Conference (2014, July 18)

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (4 ULg)
See detailHow to locate intermodal terminals for achieving economic and environmental competitiveness?
Mostert, Martine ULg; Limbourg, Sabine ULg

Conference (2014, April 25)

Europe has a strong commitment to the development of competitive and sustainable transportation. An intermediate objective cited in the “White Paper” is to shift 30% of 300 km and above road freight ... [more ▼]

Europe has a strong commitment to the development of competitive and sustainable transportation. An intermediate objective cited in the “White Paper” is to shift 30% of 300 km and above road freight transportation to more environmentally-friendly modes of transport such as rail and water by 2030. Improving and expanding the intermodal network is one way to achieve this goal. However, intermodal transport requires intermodal terminals where the transfer from one mode to another can occur. The location of those terminals is of strategic importance for the competitiveness of intermodal transport. The objective of this paper is therefore to develop a network design model which allows the optimal location of intermodal terminals to be determined, subject to both economic and environmental efficiency. Three possible combinations are considered: (i) Road-only, (ii) Intermodal transport using road (drayage) and rail (long-haul) and (iii) Intermodal transport using road (drayage) and inland waterways (long-haul). External costs are also included in the analysis, i.e. costs that are generated by an economic agent but supported by other agents of the society. This strategy is in line with the willingness of Europe to internalize external costs. The developed model can be used to test how modal split is influenced by the undertaken policies, such as internalizing external costs in the transportation costs. Tests are carried out on the case study of Belgium. [less ▲]

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See detailLogistics hub: the case of Liège
Limbourg, Sabine ULg; Mostert, Martine ULg; Paquay, Célia ULg

Conference (2014, April 24)

A logistics hub can be defined as a specific area where all the activities relating to transport, logistics and goods distribution are carried out. With its central location in Europe, highly developed ... [more ▼]

A logistics hub can be defined as a specific area where all the activities relating to transport, logistics and goods distribution are carried out. With its central location in Europe, highly developed infrastructures, airport and inland terminals, the region of Liège claims to be a logistics hub. This paper applies a strategic decision model based on seven relevant criteria (infrastructure, proximity to market, land availability, government and industry support, labour supply, origin/destination distances and congestion) to assess the efficiency of the logistics hub of the region of Liège. Two SWOT analyses are performed in parallel to evaluate the positions of Liège Airport and of the inland freight hub, Trilogiport, in relation to their own performances and the competition. The two main development factors of inland freight hubs are considered: the possibility of modal shift from road transport to more environmentally friendly transportation modes and the avoidance of the congestion of the two seaport areas of Antwerp and Rotterdam. This article concludes by highlighting that the bid of the region of Liège and its characteristics should contribute to a more efficient intermodal transport in Europe, helping to boost the distribution of products, and at the same time, encourage the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. However, the development of Liège as an inland freight hub depends on its ability to generate a critical mass, notably thanks to the local businesses, in order to realise economies of scale. [less ▲]

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See detailThe economic and environmental feasibility of biogas buses in Liege
Mostert, Martine ULg; Limbourg, Sabine ULg

in 2013 BIVEC-GIBET Transport Research Days - Proceedings (2013, May 30)

Everyday, many students at the University of Liège have to drive to the Sart-Tilman village to attend their courses. These journeys are responsible for the emission of harmful particles which have ... [more ▼]

Everyday, many students at the University of Liège have to drive to the Sart-Tilman village to attend their courses. These journeys are responsible for the emission of harmful particles which have negative impacts on climate and human health. This paper analyzes the economic and environmental feasibility of using biogas buses for public transport in Liège. The idea of implementing biogas buses is based on the proposed recycling of organic waste by the company INTRADEL, which manages and treats waste in the region. The economic and environmental advantages and drawbacks of biogas buses are developed and compared with those of the current diesel bus fleet. The main conclusion of this study is that, while internalizing external costs due to pollution, the use of biogas buses becomes an attractive option compared with classical diesel buses. Nevertheless, it requires investment and might lead to resistance to change. However, it remains a good solution for the reduction of CO2 emissions. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 141 (20 ULg)