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See detailImpact of co-transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells on lung function after unrelated allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation following non-myeloablative conditioning
MOERMANS, Catherine ULg; LECHANTEUR, Chantal ULg; BAUDOUX, Etienne ULg et al

in Transplantation (in press)

Background: In the context of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been used to promote engraftment and prevent graft- versus-host-disease. However, in animal ... [more ▼]

Background: In the context of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been used to promote engraftment and prevent graft- versus-host-disease. However, in animal models, MSC were shown to cause pulmonary alterations after systemic administration. The impact of MSC infusion on lung function has not been studied in humans. The objective of the study was to investigate the impact of MSC co-infusion on lung function and airway inflammation as well as on the incidence of pulmonary infections and cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation after HSCT. Methods: We have prospectively followed 30 patients who underwent unrelated HSCT with MSC co-infusion after non-myeloablative conditioning (NMA). Each patient underwent detailed lung function testing (FEV1, FVC, FEV1/FVC, RV, TLC, DLCO and KCO) and measurement of exhaled nitric oxide before HSCT and 3, 6 and 12 months posttransplant. The incidence of pulmonary infections and CMV reactivation were also monitored. This group was compared with another group of 28 patients who underwent the same type of transplantation but without MSC co-infusion. Results: Lung function tests did not show important modifications over time and did not differ between the MSC and control groups. There was a higher 1-year incidence of infection, particularly of fungal infections, in patients having received a MSC co-infusion. There was no difference between groups regarding the 1-year incidence of CMV reactivation. Conclusions: MSC co-infusion does not induce pulmonary deterioration 1 year after HSCT with NMA conditioning. MSC appear to be safe for the lung but close monitoring of pulmonary infections remains essential. [less ▲]

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See detailLung function and airway inflammation monitoring after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.
Moermans, Catherine ULg; Poulet, Christophe ULg; HENKET, Monique ULg et al

in Respiratory Medicine (2013), 107

Background Induced sputum is a non-invasive method to investigate airway inflammation, which has been used to assess pulmonary inflammatory diseases. However, this procedure has not been studied in the ... [more ▼]

Background Induced sputum is a non-invasive method to investigate airway inflammation, which has been used to assess pulmonary inflammatory diseases. However, this procedure has not been studied in the context of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Methods We monitored lung function in 182 patients who underwent HSCT and measured airway inflammation by sputum induction in 80 of them. We prospectively measured FEV1, FVC, DLCO, KCO, TLC, RV, exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) as well as sputum cell counts before and 3, 6, 12, 24 and 36 months after HSCT. Results For the whole cohort there was a progressive decrease in TLC, which was significant after 3 years (p < 0.01). By contrast, there was no change in other lung functions parameters or in FeNO. Baseline sputum analysis revealed increased neutrophil counts in patients {Median (IQR): 63% (38–79)} compared to healthy subjects matched for age {Median (IQR): 49% (17–67), p < 0.001} but there was no significant change in any type of sputum cell counts over the three years. When comparing myeloablative (MA) vs non-myeloablative (NMA) conditioning, falls in FEV1, FVC and DLCO, and rise in RV and sputum neutrophils were more pronounced over the first year of observation in those receiving MA. Conclusions There was a progressive loss in lung function after HSCT, featuring a restrictive pattern. Myeloablative conditioning was associated with early rise of sputum neutrophils and greater alteration in lung function over the first year. [less ▲]

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See detailLocal and systemic cellular inflammation and cytokine release in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
Moermans, Catherine ULg; HEINEN, Vincent ULg; NGUYEN DANG, Delphine ULg et al

in Cytokine (2011), 56(2), 298-304

BACKGROUND: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic airway inflammatory disease caused by repeated exposure to noxious gases or particles. It is now recognized that the disease also ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic airway inflammatory disease caused by repeated exposure to noxious gases or particles. It is now recognized that the disease also features systemic inflammation. The purpose of our study was to compare airway and systemic inflammation in COPD to that seen in healthy subjects and to relate the inflammation with the disease severity. METHODS: Ninety-five COPD patients, encompassing the whole severity spectrum of the disease, were recruited from our outpatient clinic and rehabilitation center and compared to 33 healthy subjects. Induced sputum and blood samples were obtained for measurement of inflammatory cell count. Interleukin (IL)-4, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma produced by 24h sputum and blood cell cultures were measured. RESULTS: Compared to healthy subjects, COPD exhibited a prominent airway neutrophilic inflammation associated with a marked IL-10, IL-6 and TNF-alpha release deficiency that contrasted with a raised IFN-gamma production. Neutrophilic inflammation was also prominent at blood level together with raised production of IFN-gamma, IL-10 and TNF-alpha. Furthermore, sputum neutrophilia correlated with disease severity assessed by GOLD stages. Likewise the extent of TNF-alpha release from blood cells also positively correlated with the disease severity but negatively with that of sputum cell culture. Blood release of TNF-alpha and IL-6 negatively correlated with body mass index. Altogether, our results showed a significant relationship between cellular marker in blood and sputum but poor relationship between local and systemic release of cytokines. CONCLUSIONS: COPD is characterized by prominent neutrophilic inflammation and raised IFN-gamma production at both bronchial and systemic level. Overproduction of TNF-alpha at systemic level correlates with disease severity and inversely with body mass index. [less ▲]

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