References of "Miossec, P"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailBalancing benefits and risks of glucocorticoids in rheumatic diseases and other inflammatory joint disorders: new insights from emerging data. An expert consensus paper from the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO)
Cooper, C.; Bardin, T.; Brandi, M.L. et al

in Aging Clinical and Experimental Research (2016), 28(1), 1-16

Purpose: This consensus review article considers the question of whether glucocorticoid (GC) therapy is still relevant in the treatment of rheumatic diseases, with a particular focus on rheumatoid ... [more ▼]

Purpose: This consensus review article considers the question of whether glucocorticoid (GC) therapy is still relevant in the treatment of rheumatic diseases, with a particular focus on rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and whether its side effects can be adequately managed. Recent basic and clinical research on the molecular, cellular and clinical effects of GCs have considerably advanced our knowledge in this field. An overview of the subject seems appropriate. Methods: This review is the result of a multidisciplinary expert working group, organised by European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis. The recent literature was surveyed and the salient evidence synthetized. Results: The pathophysiological basis of RA (and other inflammatory rheumatic diseases) now strongly implicates the adaptive immune system in addition to innate mechanisms. The molecular effect of GCs and differential GC sensitivity is better understood, although exploiting this knowledge is still in its infancy. The newer treatment strategies of early and aggressive control of RA have greatly improved clinical outcomes, but improvements are still possible. Newer targeted anti-inflammatory drugs have made an important impact, yet they too are associated with numerous side effects. Discussion: Short durations of moderate doses of GCs are generally well tolerated and have a positive benefit/risk ratio. Patients should be assessed for fracture risk and bone preserving agents and be prescribed calcium and vitamin D supplementation. Conclusions: Within a strategy of a disease modifying approach to inflammatory disease, combination therapy including a GC is effective approach. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailClinical trials of new drugs for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis: focus on early disease
SMOLEN, J.S.; COLLAUD BASSET, S.; BOERS, M. et al

in Annals of Rheumatic Diseases (2016), 75

The European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases convened a task force of experts in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and clinical trial ... [more ▼]

The European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases convened a task force of experts in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and clinical trial methodology to comment on the new draft ‘Guideline on clinical investigation of medicinal products for the treatment of RA’ released by the European Medicines Agency (EMA). Special emphasis was placed by the group on the development of new drugs for the treatment of early RA. In the absence of a clear definition of early RA, it was suggested that clinical investigations in this condition were conducted in disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs naïve patients with no more than 1 year disease duration. The expert group recommended using an appropriate improvement in disease activity (American College of Rheumatology (ACR) or Simplified/Clinical Disease Activity Index (SDAI/CDAI) response criteria) or low disease activity (by any score) as primary endpoints, with ACR/European League Against Rheumatism remission as a secondary endpoint. Finally, as compelling evidence showed that the Disease Acrivity Score using 28-joint counts (DAS28) might not provide a reliable definition of remission, or sometimes even low disease activity, the group suggested replacing DAS28 as a measurement instrument to evaluate disease activity in RA clinical trials. Proposed alternatives included SDAI, CDAI and Boolean criteria. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (8 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailBiomarkers and personalised medicine in rheumatoid arthritis: a proposal for interactions between academia, industry and regulatory bodies.
Miossec, P.; Verweij, C. L.; Klareskog, L. et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2011), 70(10), 1713-8

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is one of the most appropriate conditions for the application of personalised medicine as a high degree of heterogeneity has been recognised, which remains to be explained. Such ... [more ▼]

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is one of the most appropriate conditions for the application of personalised medicine as a high degree of heterogeneity has been recognised, which remains to be explained. Such heterogeneity is also reflected in the large number of treatment targets and options. A growing number of biologics as well as small molecules are already in use and there are promising new drugs in development. In order to make the best use of treatment options, both targeted and non-targeted biomarkers have to be identified and validated. To this aim, new rules are needed for the interaction between academia and industry under regulatory control. Setting up multi-centre biosample collections with clear definition of access, organising early, possibly non-committing discussions with regulatory authorities, and defining a clear route for the validation, qualification and registration of the biomarker-drug combination are some of the more critical areas where effective collaboration between the drug industry, academia and regulators is needed. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 97 (16 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailPotentialités de modulation de la réaction inflammatoire
Delannoy, I.; Miossec, P.; Lekeux, Pierre ULg

in Annales de Médecine Vétérinaire (1993), 137

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (1 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailCytokine and anti-cytokine strategies in inflammatory reaction modulation
Delannoy, I.; Lekeux, Pierre ULg; Miossec, P.

in Veterinary Research (1993), 24

Evidence of the importance of a cytokine cascade in the induction and control of the inflammatory reaction is increasing. Although cytokines are required in the inflammatory process in response to ... [more ▼]

Evidence of the importance of a cytokine cascade in the induction and control of the inflammatory reaction is increasing. Although cytokines are required in the inflammatory process in response to infection or injury, their overproduction, particularly that of interleukin-1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF), can lead to local/systemic pathology. Selective inhibition of the synthesis or of the action of specific cytokines may be of therapeutic benefit. Various strategies for blocking IL-1 and TNF activities have been presented. While selective inhibition of cytokine synthesis is still in the early experimental phase, specific blockade of soluble cytokine action following synthesis and release from cells is undergoing preliminary clinical trials in humans. Animal data suggest that antimonoclonal therapy such as monoclonal antibodies to TNF, IL-1 receptor antagonists or soluble receptors to TNF and IL-1 can be effective in the modulation of the inflammatory reaction. Modulation of the cytokine network in some diseases might also include the use of anti-inflammatory cytokines. Nonetheless, the possibilities of side effects due to impaired host-defense mechanisms with the IL-1 or TNF blockade must also be taken into consideration. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (0 ULg)