References of "Miller, Rebecca"
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See detailThe colonisation history of British water vole (Arvicola amphibius [L., 1758]): origins and development of the Celtic Fringe
Brace, Selina; Ruddy, Mark; Miller, Rebecca ULg et al

in Proceedings of the Royal Society B : Biological Sciences (2016)

The terminal Pleistocene and Early Holocene, a period from 15 000 to 18 000 Before Present (BP), was critical in establishing the current Holarctic fauna, with temperate-climate species largely replacing ... [more ▼]

The terminal Pleistocene and Early Holocene, a period from 15 000 to 18 000 Before Present (BP), was critical in establishing the current Holarctic fauna, with temperate-climate species largely replacing cold-adapted ones at midlatitudes. However, the timing and nature of this process remain unclear for many taxa, a point that impacts on current and future management strategies. Here, we use an ancient DNA dataset to test more directly postglacial histories of the water vole (Arvicola amphibius, formerly A. terrestris), a species that is both a conservation priority and a pest in different parts of its range. We specifically examine colonization of Britain, where a complex genetic structure can be observed today. Although we focus on population history at the limits of the species’ range, the inclusion of additional European samples allows insights into European postglacial colonization events and provides a molecular perspective on water vole taxonomy. [less ▲]

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See detailCan orbital angle morphology distinguish dogs from wolves?
Janssens, Luc; Spanoghe, Inge; Miller, Rebecca ULg et al

in Zoomorphology (2016)

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See detailThe morphology of the mandibular coronoid process does not indicate that Canis lupus chanco is the progenitor to dogs
Janssens, Luc; Miller, Rebecca ULg; Van Dongen, Stefan

in Zoomorphology (2016)

The domestication of wolves is currently under debate. Where, when and from which wolf sub-species dogs originated are being investigated both by osteoarchaeologists and geneticists. While DNA research is ... [more ▼]

The domestication of wolves is currently under debate. Where, when and from which wolf sub-species dogs originated are being investigated both by osteoarchaeologists and geneticists. While DNA research is rapidly becoming more active and popular, morphological methods have been the gold standard in the past. But even today morphological details are routinely employed to discern archaeological wolves from dogs. One such morphological similarity between Canis lupus chanco and dogs was published in 1977 by Olsen and Olsen. This concerns the ‘‘turned back’’ anatomy of the dorsal part of the vertical ramus of the mandible that was claimed to be specific to domestic dogs and Chinese wolves C. lupus chanco, and ‘‘absent from other canids’’. Based on this characteristic, C. lupus chanco was said to be the progenitor of Asian and American dogs, and this specific morphology has been continuously used as an argument to assign archaeological specimens, including non-Asian and on-American, to the dog clade. We challenged this statement by examining 384 dog skulls of 72 breeds and 60 skulls of four wolf subspecies. Only 20 % of dog mandibles and 80 % of C. lupus chanco showed the specific anatomy. In addition, 12 % of Canis lupus pallipes mandibles howed the ‘‘turned back’’ morphology. It can be concluded that the shape of the coronoid process of the mandible cannot be used as a morphological trait to determine whether a specimen belongs to a dog or as an argument in favour of chanco as the progenitor to dogs. [less ▲]

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See detailModave/Modave: Trou Al’Wesse: Fouilles 2013-2014
Miller, Rebecca ULg; Otte, Marcel ULg; Ernotte, Isabelle

in Chronique de l'Archéologie Wallonne (2015), 23

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See detailLa transition du paléolithique moyen au Paléolithique supérieur du Trou Al’Wesse: L'étude des unités stratigraphiques 17‐15
Miller, Rebecca ULg; Stewart, John; Knul, Monika et al

in Pré-Actes des Journées d'Archéologie en Wallonie (2015)

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See detailThe Middle to Upper Palaeolithic transition at Trou Al'Wesse: A preliminary overview of stratigraphic units 17 to 15
Miller, Rebecca ULg; Stewart, John; Knul, Monika et al

in Notae Praehistoricae (2015), 35

Units 17, 16 and 15, currently being excavated on the terrace, cover the Middle to Upper Palaeolithic transition at the site of Trou Al'Wesse. These include Late Mousterian layers (Unit 17), an ... [more ▼]

Units 17, 16 and 15, currently being excavated on the terrace, cover the Middle to Upper Palaeolithic transition at the site of Trou Al'Wesse. These include Late Mousterian layers (Unit 17), an archaeologically sterile unit (Unit 16) that contains fauna that will clarify environmental and climatic changes across the transition, and Aurignacian layers (Unit 15). In addition, the discovery of an Aurignacian endscraper on a large blade in previously unexcavated deposits and an undisturbed cave bear den inside the cave suggests that the cave deposits will contain evidence of Mousterian and Aurignacian occupations untouched by the 19th century excavations of Dupont and Fraipont. This paper presents a preliminary overview of the stratigraphic sequence and chronology on the terrace as well as the lithic and faunal assemblages recovered so far. [less ▲]

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See detailRadiocarbon dating of Mesolithic human remains in Belgium and Luxembourg
Meiklejohn, Christopher; Miller, Rebecca ULg; Toussaint, Michel ULg

in Mesolithic Miscellany (2014), 22(2), 10-39

This, the sixth of a series on the chronology of Mesolithic human remains, uses, with one exception, identical methods to the previous paper in the series (Meiklejohn and Woodman 2012). Date calibration ... [more ▼]

This, the sixth of a series on the chronology of Mesolithic human remains, uses, with one exception, identical methods to the previous paper in the series (Meiklejohn and Woodman 2012). Date calibration employs CALIB version 6.1 with dates reported at a 1 range. The exception to previous use is that no marine correction is applied to any finds, based on two considerations. Critical is that “(a) dietary protein source based mainly on terrestrial mammals, with the possible addition of some freshwater components, is … supported by the isotopic composition of … Mesolithic human collagen from (Belgium and Luxembourg), with few differences occurring between individuals” (Bocherens et al. 2007, 18). The second is that 13C levels range from -19.4 to -24.8, in clear support of this conclusion. The one exception, Atsebach in Luxembourg (13C = -17.3), is dated to the Neolithic (see section 2.3). Absence of a marine dietary component is also consistent with the distance of all sites from an ocean source, though Van Neer (1997; Van Neer et al. 2007) reports evidence for fishing in Magdalenian deposits from the Meuse Basin at Bois Laiterie and Chaleux, both discussed below. As previously, we stress the importance of reporting raw 14C laboratory values. Calibrations are a function of calibration engine, reservoir correction value, and marine and terrestrial isotopic limits used. Calibrated dates published alone are very difficult to interpret. [less ▲]

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See detailAnalysis of collagen preservation in bones recovered in archaeological contexts using NIR Hyperspectral Imaging
Vincke, Damien; Miller, Rebecca ULg; Stassart, Edith ULg et al

in Talanta (2014), 125

The scope of this article is to propose an innovative method based on Near Infrared Hyperspectral Chemical Imaging (NIR-HCI) to rapidly and non-destructively evaluate the relative degree of collagen ... [more ▼]

The scope of this article is to propose an innovative method based on Near Infrared Hyperspectral Chemical Imaging (NIR-HCI) to rapidly and non-destructively evaluate the relative degree of collagen preservation in bones recovered from archaeological contexts. This preliminary study has allowed the evaluation of the potential of the method using bone samples from the Early Upper Palaeolithic, Mesolithic and Neolithic periods at the site of Trou Al'Wesse in Belgium. NIR-HCI, combined with chemometric tools, has identified specific spectral bands characteristic of collagen. A chemometric model has been built using Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA) to identify bones with and without collagen. This enables the evaluation of the degree of collagen preservation and homogeneity in bones within and between different strata, which has direct implications for archaeological applications (e.g., taphonomic analyses, assemblage integrity) and sample selection for sub- sequent analyses requiring collagen. Two archaeological applications are presented: comparison between sub-layers in an Early Upper Palaeolithic unit, and evaluation of the range of variability in collagen preservation within a single Holocene stratum. [less ▲]

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See detailMaisieres-Canal: An Open-Air Aurignacian Workshop
Miller, Rebecca ULg

in Smith, Claire (Ed.) Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology (2014)

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See detailCouvin/Couvin : Trou de l'Abîme
Miller, Rebecca ULg; Cattelain, Pierre; Otte, Marcel ULg et al

in Chronique de l'Archéologie Wallonne (2014), 21

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See detailAnalysis of Soils in Agriculture and Archaeology by NIR Hyperspectral Imaging
Fernandez Pierna, Juan Antonio; Vincke, Damien; Eylenbosch, Damien ULg et al

Conference (2013, May 23)

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See detailSerial population extinctions in a small mammal indicate Late Pleistocene ecosystem instability
Brace, Selina; Palkopoulou, Eleftheria; Dalén, Love et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2012), 109(50), 20532-20536

The Late Pleistocene global extinction of many terrestrial mammal species has been a subject of intensive scientific study for over a century, yet the relative contributions of environmental changes and ... [more ▼]

The Late Pleistocene global extinction of many terrestrial mammal species has been a subject of intensive scientific study for over a century, yet the relative contributions of environmental changes and the global expansion of humans remain unresolved. A defining component of these extinctions is a bias toward large species, with the majority of small-mammal taxa apparently surviving into the present. Here, we investigate the population-level history of a key tundra-specialist small mammal, the collared lemming (Dicrostonyx torquatus), to explore whether events during the Late Pleistocene had a discernible effect beyond the large mammal fauna. Using ancient DNA techniques to sample across three sites in North-West Europe, we observe a dramatic reduction in genetic diversity in this species over the last 50,000 y. We further identify a series of extinction-recolonization events, indicating a previously unrecognized instability in Late Pleistocene small-mammal populations, which we link with climatic fluctuations. Our results reveal climate-associated, repeated regional extinctions in a keystone prey species across the Late Pleistocene, a pattern likely to have had an impact on the wider steppe-tundra community, and one that is concordant with environmental change as a major force in structuring Late Pleistocene biodiversity. [less ▲]

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See detailChronostratigraphic context of the Middle to Upper Palaeolithic transition. Recent data from Belgium
Pirson, Stéphane; Flas, Damien ULg; Abrams, Grégory et al

in Quaternary International (2012), 259

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See detailInterprétation chronostratigraphique de la séquence holocène du Trou Al'Wesse à la lumière des nouvelles datations : du Mésolithique ancien au Néolithique moyen
Miller, Rebecca ULg; Stassart, Edith ULg; Otte, Marcel ULg et al

in Notae Praehistoricae (2012), 32

The AMS dates obtained for the Holocene sequence are stratigraphically coherent, and indicate occupations at Trou Al’Wesse during the Early, Late and Final Mesolithic phases and the during the Middle ... [more ▼]

The AMS dates obtained for the Holocene sequence are stratigraphically coherent, and indicate occupations at Trou Al’Wesse during the Early, Late and Final Mesolithic phases and the during the Middle Neolithic. This paper presents an interpretation of the chronostratigraphy in light of the recently obtained dates. [less ▲]

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See detailModave/Modave : nouvelles découvertes dans la séquence holocène du Trou Al'Wesse, fouilles 2009-2010
Miller, Rebecca ULg; Otte, Marcel ULg; Stewart, John

in Chronique de l'Archéologie Wallonne (2012), 19

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See detailCouvin/Couvin : fouilles 2010 au Trou de l'Abîme
Miller, Rebecca ULg; Cattelain, Pierre

in Chronique de l'Archéologie Wallonne (2012), 19

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See detailCouvin/Couvin : fouilles 2010 au Trou de l’Abîme
Miller, Rebecca ULg; Cattelain, P.; Flas, Damien ULg et al

in Chronique de l'Archéologie Wallonne (2012), 19

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See detailMapping the expansion of the Northwest Magdalenian
Miller, Rebecca ULg

in Quaternary International (2012), 272-273

New paleoclimatic data for the Lateglacial clarify climatic phases during the Lateglacial. Cold climate played a key role in limiting Magdalenian expansion from southwest and central Europe This paper ... [more ▼]

New paleoclimatic data for the Lateglacial clarify climatic phases during the Lateglacial. Cold climate played a key role in limiting Magdalenian expansion from southwest and central Europe This paper presents chronological and geographic data for the different climatic phases to map the expansion of the Magdalenian into northwest Europe. Specifically, it can be seen that initial expansion follows a southwest-northeast trajectory into southern Germany, followed by northern expansion into Belgium, central Germany and the Paris Basin at the end of the Oldest Dryas. During the Bølling and Allerød phases, human occupation intensified in the Paris Basin and contacts and/or territorial exploitation between both the Paris Basin and the Rhineland region with Belgian territory is demonstrated. [less ▲]

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See detailLa séquence mésolithique et néolithique du Trou Al'Wesse (Belgique) : Résultats pluridisciplinaires
Miller, Rebecca ULg; Zwyns, Nicolas; Otte, Marcel ULg et al

in Anthropologie (L') (2012), 116

The site of Trou Al’Wesse has been interpreted as a site of possible contact between Mesolithic and Neolithic populations, given the discovery of Neolithic ceramics and Mesolithic tools in stratum 4 ... [more ▼]

The site of Trou Al’Wesse has been interpreted as a site of possible contact between Mesolithic and Neolithic populations, given the discovery of Neolithic ceramics and Mesolithic tools in stratum 4. However, recent excavations have also revealed the presence of three Early Mesolithic facies overlain by a Neolithic layer, while a Late Mesolithic presence is suggested for a fourth facies at the base of the terrace slope. Lithic and faunal analyses, as well as spatial analysis of the stratigraphic position of material recovered, indicate a clear separation of Mesolithic and Neolithic occupations. We present a new interpretation of the sequence of Holocene human occupations at Trou Al'Wesse in light of these data, arguing that the site was regularly occupied during the Early Mesolithic, forming a palimpsest of these visits, followed by an occupational hiatus and then re-occupation during the Late Mesolithic. The Early Neolithic is a separate occupation clearly unrelated to the Early Mesolithic underlying it, but ongoing fieldwork may recover data concerning the Final Mesolithic and its relation to the Early Neolithic at the site. [less ▲]

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