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See detailThe thermal structure of the Venus atmosphere: Intercomparison of Venus Express and ground based observations of vertical temperature and density profiles✰
Limaye, Sanjay S.; Lebonnois, Sebastien; Mahieux, Arnaud et al

in Icarus (2017), 294

The Venus International Reference Atmosphere (VIRA) model contains tabulated values of temperature and number densities obtained by the experiments on the Venera entry probes, Pioneer Venus Orbiter and ... [more ▼]

The Venus International Reference Atmosphere (VIRA) model contains tabulated values of temperature and number densities obtained by the experiments on the Venera entry probes, Pioneer Venus Orbiter and multi-probe missions in the 1980s. The instruments on the recent Venus Express orbiter mission generated a significant amount of new observational data on the vertical and horizontal structure of the Venus atmosphere from 40 km to about 180 km altitude from April 2006 to November 2014. Many ground based experiments have provided data on the upper atmosphere (90-130 km) temperature structure since the publication of VIRA in 1985. The "Thermal Structure of the Venus Atmosphere" Team was supported by the International Space Studies Institute (ISSI), Bern, Switzerland, from 2013 to 2015 in order to combine and compare the ground-based observations and the VEx observations of the thermal structure as a first step towards generating an updated VIRA model. Results of this comparison are presented in five latitude bins and three local time bins by assuming hemispheric symmetry. The intercomparison of the ground-based and VEx results provides for the first time a consistent picture of the temperature and density structure in the 40 km-180 km altitude range. The Venus Express observations have considerably increased our knowledge of the Venus atmospheric thermal structure above ∼40 km and provided new information above 100 km. There are, however, still observational gaps in latitude and local time above certain regions. Considerable variability in the temperatures and densities is seen above 100 km but certain features appear to be systematically present, such as a succession of warm and cool layers. Preliminary modeling studies support the existence of such layers in agreement with a global scale circulation. The intercomparison focuses on average profiles but some VEx experiments provide sufficient global coverage to identify solar thermal tidal components. The differences between the VEx temperature profiles and the VIRA below 0.1 mbar/95 km are small. There is, however, a clear discrepancy at high latitudes in the 10-30 mbar (70-80 km) range. The VEx observations will also allow the improvement of the empirical models (VTS3 by Hedin et al., 1983 and VIRA by Keating et al., 1985) above 0.03 mbar/100 km, in particular the 100-150 km region where a sufficient observational coverage was previously missing. The next steps in order to define the updated VIRA temperature structure up to 150 km altitude are (1) define the grid on which this database may be provided, (2) fill what is possible with the results of the data intercomparison, and (3) fill the observational gaps. An interpolation between the datasets may be performed by using available General Circulation Models as guidelines. An improved spatial coverage of observations is still necessary at all altitudes, in latitude-longitude and at all local solar times for a complete description of the atmospheric thermal structure, in particular on the dayside above 100 km. New in-situ observations in the atmosphere below 40 km are missing, an altitude region that cannot be accessed by occultation experiments. All these questions need to be addressed by future missions. [less ▲]

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See detailPreliminary JIRAM results from Juno polar observations: 2. Analysis of the Jupiter southern H3 + emissions and comparison with the north aurora
Adriani, Alberto; Mura, Alessandro; Moriconi, M. L. et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (2017), 44(10), 4633-4640

The Jupiter InfraRed Auroral Mapper (JIRAM) aboard Juno observed the Jovian South Pole aurora during the first orbit of the mission. H3 + (trihydrogen cation) and CH4 (methane) emissions have been ... [more ▼]

The Jupiter InfraRed Auroral Mapper (JIRAM) aboard Juno observed the Jovian South Pole aurora during the first orbit of the mission. H3 + (trihydrogen cation) and CH4 (methane) emissions have been identified and measured. The observations have been carried out in nadir and slant viewing both by a L-filtered imager and a 2–5 μm spectrometer. Results from the spectral analysis of the all observations taken over the South Pole by the instrument are reported. The coverage of the southern aurora during these measurements has been partial, but sufficient to determine different regions of temperature and abundance of the H3 + ion from its emission lines in the 3–4 μm wavelength range. Finally, the results from the southern aurora are also compared with those from the northern ones from the data taken during the same perijove pass and reported by Dinelli et al. (2017). ©2017. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailOxygen nightglow emissions of Venus: Vertical distribution and collisional quenching
Gérard, Jean-Claude ULiege; Soret, Lauriane ULiege; Migliorini, Alessandra et al

in Icarus (2013)

We compare the altitude of three O2 night airglow emissions observed at the limb of Venus by the VIRTIS spectral imager with the values predicted by a model accounting for the different radiative ... [more ▼]

We compare the altitude of three O2 night airglow emissions observed at the limb of Venus by the VIRTIS spectral imager with the values predicted by a model accounting for the different radiative lifetimes and collisional deactivation of the upper O2 states. The O and CO2 density profiles are based on remote sensing observations from the Venus Express spacecraft. Effective production efficiencies of the involved O2 metastable states and quenching coefficients by oxygen and carbon dioxide are adjusted to provide the best match with the measured emission limb profiles. We find values in general good agreement with earlier studies for the c1Σ-u state which gives rise to the Herzberg II bands. In particular, we confirm the low net yield of the c state production and the importance of its deactivation by CO2, for which we derive a quenching coefficient of 3x10-16 cm-3 s-1. The ∼4.5 km higher altitude of the Chamberlain band emission also recently detected by VIRTIS and the ratio of the Herzberg II/Chamberlain bands observed with Venera are well reproduced. To reach agreement, we use a 12% yield for the A’3Δu production following O atom association and quenching coefficients by O and CO2 of 1.3x10-11 cm-3 s-1 and 4.5x10-13 cm-3 s-1 respectively. We conclude that the different peak altitudes of the IR Atmospheric, Herzberg II and the Chamberlain bands reflect the relative importance of radiative relaxation and collisional quenching by O and CO2. [less ▲]

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See detailThe oxygen nightglow emissions of Venus: vertical distribution and role of collisional quenching
Gérard, Jean-Claude ULiege; Soret, Lauriane ULiege; Migliorini, Alessandra et al

Conference (2012, April)

The oxygen nightglow emissions of Venus: vertical distribution and role of collisional quenching J.-C. Gérard (1), L. Soret (1), A. Migliorini (2), G. Piccioni (2), and P. Drossart (3) (1) LPAP ... [more ▼]

The oxygen nightglow emissions of Venus: vertical distribution and role of collisional quenching J.-C. Gérard (1), L. Soret (1), A. Migliorini (2), G. Piccioni (2), and P. Drossart (3) (1) LPAP - Université de Liège - Belgium (jc.gerard@ulg.ac.be, 0032 4 366 9711), (2) INAF - Rome, Italy, (3) LESIA, Observatoire de Paris - Meudon, France Three-body recombination of atomic oxygen produces O2 molecules excited in different electronic states such as a 1∆g, b 1 􏰀+g , A 3 􏰀+u , c 1 􏰀uand A’ 3∆u, each with a specific quantum efficiency. When they radiate, optical transitions are observed in a wide range of wavelengths extending from the ultraviolet to the near infrared. In planetary atmospheres, spontaneous radiative deexcitation compete with collisional quenching with ambient molecules and atoms. As a consequence, the corresponding airglow emission profiles may significantly differ from each other in brightness and altitude of the emitting layer. We model the volume emission rates and limb profiles of the O2 Atmospheric Infrared (a 1∆-X 3 􏰀), Herzberg I (A 3 􏰀-X 3 􏰀), Herzberg II (c 1 􏰀-X 3 􏰀), Chamberlain (A’ 3∆-a 1∆) bands expected on the Venus night side. The quenching rates are taken from laboratory and observational planetary data and we apply two different methods to determine the oxygen and CO2 density profiles. One is based on recent analysis of data collected by instruments on board the Venus Express mission. The second one uses a one-dimensional chemical-diffusive model where the free parameters are the strength of turbulent transport and the downward flux of O atoms. Both approaches indicate that the calculated intensities of each transition range over several orders of magnitude and that differences are expected in the altitude of the maximum emission. These predictions will be compared with VIRTIS/Venus Express limb observations, which make it possible to derive the vertical distribution of the O2 emissions in the visible and infrared. These measurements suggest that no difference is observed between the altitude of the peak of the IR Atmospheric and Herzberg II bands. Conclusions will be drawn about the validity of the current set of quenching coefficients used in the model. [less ▲]

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