References of "Micheels, Jean"
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See detailSafety of Fully Automatic External Defibrillation by Untrained Lay Rescuers in the Presence of a Bystander
Hosmans, Tony; Maquoi, Isabelle ULg; Vogels, Catherine et al

in Resuscitation (2008), 77(2), 216-219

OBJECTIVE: Automated external defibrillators (AEDs) are becoming increasingly available in public places to be used by citizens in case of cardiac arrest. Most AEDs are semi-automatic (SAEDs), but some ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: Automated external defibrillators (AEDs) are becoming increasingly available in public places to be used by citizens in case of cardiac arrest. Most AEDs are semi-automatic (SAEDs), but some are fully automatic (FAEDs) and there is ongoing debate and concern that they may lead to inadvertent shocks to rescuers or bystanders because the timing of the shock is not controlled by the rescuer. We therefore compared the behaviour of untrained citizens using an FAED or an SAED in a simulated cardiac arrest scenario. DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS: One hundred and seventy-six laypeople were randomised to use an FAED or an SAED (Lifepak CR+, Medtronic, Redmond, USA) in a simulated cardiac arrest scenario on a manikin (Ambu, Denmark) where a bystander was touching the victim's upper arm. Each rescuer's performance was recorded on video and analysed afterwards using a modified Cardiff Score. The rescuer or the bystander was considered unsafe if either of them touched the victim during shock delivery. RESULTS: Eleven cases could not be analysed because of technical problems. Fifteen participants violated the protocol making further analysis impossible. Of the remaining 150 participants, 68 used the FAED and 82 used the SAED. The rescuers were safe in 97/150 (65%) cases, without a difference between FAED and SAED. The bystander was safe in 25/68 (37%) cases in the FAED group versus 19/82 (23%) in the SAED group (p=0.07). Combined safety of both rescuer and bystander was observed in 23/68 (34%) cases in the FAED group versus 15/82 (18%) in the SAED group (p=0.03). CONCLUSIONS: Safety was not compromised when untrained lay rescuers used an FAED compared with an SAED. The observation of overall safer behaviour by FAED users in the presence of bystanders may be related to the additional instructions provided by the FAED, and the reduced interaction of the rescuer with the bystander when using the SAED. [less ▲]

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See detailProblematique Liee aux transferts medicalises secondaires en Belgique: l'experience developpee au CHU de Liege
Brasseur, Edmond ULg; Micheels, Jean ULg; Ghuysen, Alexandre ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2007), 62(2), 97-102

Evaluation of the aid of an emergency mobile unit to transfer monitorized patients to a University hospital, in the political context of regional care network offering highly qualified but restricted ... [more ▼]

Evaluation of the aid of an emergency mobile unit to transfer monitorized patients to a University hospital, in the political context of regional care network offering highly qualified but restricted tertiary area centres, and an open prospective study conducted over the 5 first months in 2006. The call regulation was assessed by the emergency physician of the transfer team and all missions were concluded with an evaluating report. An amount of 197 requests were taken into account from which 80 % were addressed between 8 am and 8 pm. The mean average time interval for missions was 59 minutes (base to base) and the distance covered was 20.7 km as a mean. In essence, indications for medical secondary transfer regarded patients in need for acute coronary care (42.6%), specific intensive care (26.4%) and neurosurgical interventions (19.3%). We noted that endotracheal intubation occurred in only one case. Mortality during such a transfer activity was absent. Medical transfer unit allows the development of specific high qualified network resources owing to the secondary addressee of patients. However, the weak incidence of complication questions the practice of systematic medical accompanying during such transfers. [less ▲]

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See detailA-t-on evalue l'interet du SAMU?
Bodson, Lucien ULg; Grenade, J.; Micheels, Jean ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2006), 61(5-6, May-Jun), 494-9

Recent international guidelines about emergency situations (ILCOR / ERC) pointed to the need of the whole "chain of survival". ALS, Advanced Life Support (the last and "medical" part of the chain ) is ... [more ▼]

Recent international guidelines about emergency situations (ILCOR / ERC) pointed to the need of the whole "chain of survival". ALS, Advanced Life Support (the last and "medical" part of the chain ) is important and influences survival rate. If no doubt exists about "what" and "when" to do in such situations, there is no consensus in industrialized countries about "who" should be in charge of such out-of-hospital acute diagnosis and treatment: emergency physicians, emergency nurses, emergency medical technicians (EMT), other "new" professionals ? ... A description of the MICU system in Belgium is given. [less ▲]

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See detailLes intoxications à l'oxyde de carbone (CO) et l'oxygénothérapie hyperbare (OHB)
Micheels, Jean ULg; Colignon, M.; Lamy, Maurice ULg

in Médecine et Hygiène (1989), 47

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See detailBiochemical investigations after burning injury: complement system, protease-antiprotease balance and acute-phase reactants.
Faymonville, Marie ULg; Micheels, Jean ULg; Bodson, Lucien ULg et al

in Burns (1987), 13(1), 26-33

Seventeen burned patients were investigated--Group I (n=10) with a mean burned area expressed as unit burn standard (UBS) of 69 +/- 24 and Group II (n = 7) with a mean UBS of 23 +/- 8. Blood samples were ... [more ▼]

Seventeen burned patients were investigated--Group I (n=10) with a mean burned area expressed as unit burn standard (UBS) of 69 +/- 24 and Group II (n = 7) with a mean UBS of 23 +/- 8. Blood samples were collected immediately after admission, 6-12 h after injury, during the morning and evening of day 1, and then daily for 2 weeks. This prospective study demonstrated complement activation in vivo in all burned patients, measured by C3d/C3 ratio index which was not related to the extent of the burned surface. A significant protease-antiprotease imbalance, correlated to the severity of burns, was found, leukocyte elastase was increased throughout the observation period, alpha 2-macroglobulin drastically decreased in severely burned patients, and alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor promptly decreased below the normal level in patients with more than 40 UBS. Finally, there was a delayed but then persistent acute-phase reactant protein response involving C-reactive protein, haptoglobin and alpha 1-acid glycoprotein, the concentrations of which reached a plateau on days 6 or 7. [less ▲]

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See detailBiochemical mediators in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) after burning injury
Faymonville, Marie ULg; Lamy, Maurice ULg; Duchateau, J. et al

in Paubert-Braquet (Ed.) Lipids mediators in the immunology of shock (1987)

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See detailLes accidents domestiques par brûlures
Micheels, Jean ULg; Lamy, Maurice ULg; Leclercq, Dieudonné ULg et al

in Collection Santé Education (1984)

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See detailLe dossier informatisé en réanimation
Micheels, Jean ULg; Wolfs, C.; Lamy, Maurice ULg

in Annales de l'Anesthésiologie Française (1980), 21(3), 215-222

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See detailIndex de gravité chez les brûlés
Micheels, Jean ULg; Lamy, Maurice ULg

in Annales de l'Anesthésiologie Française (1980), 21(3), 276-280

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