References of "Michaux, Johan"
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See detailWhat do Pneumocystis organisms tell us about the phylogeography of their hosts? The case of the woodmouse Apodemus sylvaticus in continental Europe and western Mediterranean islands
Demanche, christine; Deville, Manjula; Michaux, Johan ULg et al

in PLoS ONE (in press)

Pneumocystis fungi represent a highly diversified biological group with numerous species, which display a strong host-specificity suggesting a long co-speciation process. In the present study, the ... [more ▼]

Pneumocystis fungi represent a highly diversified biological group with numerous species, which display a strong host-specificity suggesting a long co-speciation process. In the present study, the presence and genetic diversity of Pneumocystis organisms was investigated in 203 lung samples from woodmice (Apodemus sylvaticus) collected on western continental Europe and Mediterranean islands. The presence of Pneumocystis DNA was assessed by nested PCR at both large and small mitochondrial subunit (mtLSU and mtSSU) rRNA loci. Direct sequencing of nested PCR products demonstrated a very high variability among woodmouse-derived Pneumocystis organisms with a total number of 30 distinct combined mtLSU and mtSSU sequence types. However, the genetic divergence among these sequence types was very low (up to 3.87%) and the presence of several Pneumocystis species within Apodemus sylvaticus was considered unlikely. The analysis of the genetic structure of woodmouse-derived Pneumocystis revealed two distinct groups. The first one comprised Pneumocystis from woodmice collected in continental Spain, France and Balearic islands. The second one included Pneumocystis from woodmice collected in continental Italy, Corsica and Sicily. These two genetic groups were in accordance with the two lineages currently described within the host species Apodemus sylvaticus. Pneumocystis organisms are emerging as powerful tools for phylogeographic studies in mammals [less ▲]

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See detailOut of Himalaya: the impact of past Asian environmental changes on the evolutionary and biogeographical history of Dipodoidea (Rodentia)
Pisano, Julie ULg; Condamine, Fabien L.; Lebedev, Vladimir et al

in Journal of Biogeography (in press)

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See detailBiogeographic variations in wood mice: Testing for the role of morphological variation as a line of least resistance to evolution
Renaud, Sabrina; Quere, Jean Pierre; Michaux, Johan ULg

in Cox, Philippe; Hautier, Lionel (Eds.) Cambridge Studies in Morphology and Molecules: New Paradigms in Evolutionary Biology ‘Evolution of the Rodents: Advances in Phylogeny, Paleontology and Functional Morphology’ (2015)

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See detailGlobal parasite and Rattus rodent invasions: The consequences for rodent-borne diseases
Morand, Serge; Bordes, Frédéric; Chen, Hsuan-Wien et al

in Integrative Zoology (2015)

We summarize the current knowledge on parasitism-related invasion processes of the globally invasive Rattus lineages, originating from Asia, and how these invasions have impacted the local epidemiology of ... [more ▼]

We summarize the current knowledge on parasitism-related invasion processes of the globally invasive Rattus lineages, originating from Asia, and how these invasions have impacted the local epidemiology of rodent-borne diseases. Parasites play an important role in the invasion processes and successes of their hosts through multiple biological mechanisms such as "parasite release", "immunocompetence advantage", “biotic resistance” and "novel weapon". Parasites may also greatly increase the impact of invasions by spillover of parasites and other pathogens, introduced with invasive hosts, into new hosts potentially leading to novel emerging diseases. Another potential impact is the ability of the invader to amplify local parasites by spill-back. In both cases, local fauna and humans may be exposed to new health risks, which may decrease biodiversity and may potentially cause increases in human morbidity and mortality. Here we review the current knowledge on these processes and propose some research priorities. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of past and future climate changes on the distribution of three Southeast Asian murine rodents
Latinne, Alice ULg; Meynard, Christine; Herbreteau, Vincent et al

in Journal of Biogeography (2015)

Aim: We tested the influence of Pleistocene climatic fluctuations and the potential effect of future climate change on Southeast Asian small mammal distributions using two forest-dwelling (Leopoldamys ... [more ▼]

Aim: We tested the influence of Pleistocene climatic fluctuations and the potential effect of future climate change on Southeast Asian small mammal distributions using two forest-dwelling (Leopoldamys herberti and Leopoldamys sabanus) and one karst (Leopoldamys neilli) endemic rodent species as models. Location: Southeast Asia. Methods: We used presence–absence data of genetically identified individuals, bioclimatic variables and species distribution modelling techniques to predict potential distributions of the three studied species under current, past [Last Interglacial (LIG) and Last Glacial Maximum (LGM)] and future conditions. We applied a variety of modelling techniques and then used consensus techniques to draw up robust maps of potential distribution ranges at all stages. Results: According to our models, these three Leopoldamys species did not experience significant range contraction during the LGM. Our models revealed substantial range contraction during the LIG for L. herberti in northern Indochina, while its distribution expanded in southern Indochina. Evidence of a southward range expansion during that period was also obtained for L. neilli, whereas L. sabanus remained widely distributed in insular Southeast Asia but experienced a range contraction on the Thai-Malay Peninsula. The two future climate change scenarios used predicted that large climatically suitable areas would still be available in the future for the three species. Main conclusions: Our model predictions contradict the well-established hypothesis that Southeast Asian forest-dwelling species were confined to small refugia during the LGM. Moreover, our results suggest that some Southeast Asian taxa may have been distributed in their refugial state during the LIG rather than the LGM. This could be because of vegetation changes that may have occurred at that time as a result of the increased seasonality observed during the LIG. These Pleistocene refugia may have been localized in northern Indochina but our study also revealed that southern Indochina could provide major potential refugia. [less ▲]

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See detailProgress on research on rodents and rodent-borne zoonoses in Southeast Asia
Blasdell, Kim; Bordes, Frédéric; Chaisiri, Kittipong et al

in Wildlife Research (2015), 42(2), 98-107

This review aims to synthesize the knowledge on the taxonomy of Southeast Asian murine rodents and the challenges associated with the identification of habitat preferences and associated rodent-borne ... [more ▼]

This review aims to synthesize the knowledge on the taxonomy of Southeast Asian murine rodents and the challenges associated with the identification of habitat preferences and associated rodent-borne diseases. Recent studies concerning the Rattini tribe have identified unclear species boundaries that would benefit from further investigation. The development of barcoding may allow more accurate identification of rodents, specifically for complex species. However, knowledge on the distribution and habitat specializations of many common murine rodents is still scarce, particularly regarding the specific habitat preferences of most synanthropic rodent species (Rattus tanezumi or Rattus exulans). Several studies have analyzed the prevalence of major rodent-borne diseases in Southeast Asia and it appears that the greatest risk of rodent zoonoses are in the lowland rainfed and irrigated landscapes, generally in and around rice fields. [less ▲]

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See detailPhylogeography analysis and molecular evolution patterns of the nematode parasite Heligmosomum mixtum based on mitochondrial DNA sequences
Sakka, Hela; Henttonen, Heikki; Baraket, Ghada et al

in Acta Parasitologica (2015), 60(1), 85-98

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See detailIntegrating hydrological features and 1 genetically validated occurrence data in occupancy 2 modeling of an endemic and endangered semi‐aquatic mammal species, Galemys pyrenaicus. 3 4
Charbonnel, Anaïs; Buisson, Laetitia; Biffi, Marjorie et al

in Biological Conservation (2015), Sous Presse

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See detailGenetic structure of fragmented southern populations of African Cape Buffalo (Syncerus caffer caffer) based on microsatellite analysis
Smitz, Nathalie ULg; Cornélis, Daniel; Chardonnet, Philippe et al

Poster (2014, December 12)

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See detailGenetic structure of nase, Chondrostoma nasus, and common barbel, Barbus barbus (Teleostei, Cyprinidae) populations in South Belgium rivers: toward a rational management of conservation restocking
Gennotte, Vincent ULg; Michaux, Johan ULg; Prignon, Christian ULg et al

Poster (2014, December)

Nase (Chondrostoma nasus) and common barbel (Barbus barbus) are two rheophilic cyprinid fish naturally present in the Belgian Meuse and Rhine basins. During the last decades, the construction of dams ... [more ▼]

Nase (Chondrostoma nasus) and common barbel (Barbus barbus) are two rheophilic cyprinid fish naturally present in the Belgian Meuse and Rhine basins. During the last decades, the construction of dams together with changes in hydrological regimes, modifications of riverbed morphology and water pollution have caused some local dramatic declines in their populations. However, recent improvements in terms of water quality and habitat fragmentation allow considering as realistic a rational restocking plan of locally endangered patrimonial fish species such as nase and common barbel. Restocking operations for a conservation purpose have to be based on the knowledge and the use of wild type genetic strains. Therefore, the aim of this study was to characterize the genetic structure and diversity of nase and common barbel populations in South Belgium rivers. Wild common barbels (n = 313) and nases (n = 271) were sampled by electrofishing in respectively 10 and 6 different tributaries from the Meuse and Rhine rivers. Genotyping was performed on 24 microsatellite markers for each species. Preliminary results showed, for both species, a differential genetic clustering between fish originating from the Meuse basin and those originating from the Rhine basin. Detailed analysis describing the genetic structure and diversity of South Belgium populations will be presented and will serve as a management tool to set up a breeding plan for conservation restocking. [less ▲]

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See detailEvidence of a fine-scale genetic structure for the endangered Pyrenean desman (Galemys pyrenaicus) in the French Pyrenees
Gillet, François ULg; Cabria Garrido, Maria Teresa; Blanc, Frédéric et al

Poster (2014, December)

The Pyrenean desman (Galemys pyrenaicus) is a small semi-aquatic mammal endemic to the Pyrenean Mountains and the northern half of the Iberian Peninsula where it lives in mountain streams of cold and well ... [more ▼]

The Pyrenean desman (Galemys pyrenaicus) is a small semi-aquatic mammal endemic to the Pyrenean Mountains and the northern half of the Iberian Peninsula where it lives in mountain streams of cold and well-oxygenated flowing waters (Nores et al. 2007). This species is currently considered as vulnerable in the IUCN Red List (Fernandes et al. 2008) and has been suffering from habitat loss and fragmentation for decades, inevitably impacting its distribution. The ecology and biology of this species are poorly known, notably because of its elusive behavior and its primarily nocturnal activity (Stone 1987, Bertrand 1994). Its distribution area is even not definitively established. Furthermore, a recent genetic study, based on mitochondrial and intronic sequences (Igea et al. 2013), showed that the genetic variability of the Pyrenean desman is very low in the Pyrenees. In this study we investigated the potential existence of a genetic structure and gene flow at a smaller scale using 24 polymorphic microsatellites loci. As the Pyrenean desman is a very elusive species, we completed our sample collection of tissues with faeces samples coming from the French distribution area of this species. Doing so, we successfully identify 70 individuals out of 355 faeces samples. Bayesian analyses revealed a cryptic genetic structure in our data set. Three clusters were evidenced (one western, one central and one eastern) and gene flow appears to be limited between these clusters (min. Fst value of 0.2). [less ▲]

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See detailPCR-RFLP identification of the endangered Pyrenean desman, Galemys pyrenaicus (Soricomorpha, Talpidae), based on faecal DNA
Gillet, François ULg; Cabria Garrido, Maria Teresa; Némoz, Mélanie et al

in Mammalia (2014)

The Pyrenean desman is a vulnerable mammal species endemic to Pyrenees and the northern Iberian Peninsula. The presence of this elusive species can be most easily detected by sampling its faeces. However ... [more ▼]

The Pyrenean desman is a vulnerable mammal species endemic to Pyrenees and the northern Iberian Peninsula. The presence of this elusive species can be most easily detected by sampling its faeces. However, these faecal samples can be confused with those of other vertebrate species living in the same habitats. This study provides two easy and reliable methods for the identification of the Pyrenean desman faeces based on genetic analyses. The first one consists of a nested PCR and sequencing of a mitochondrial cytochrome b fragment, and the second one is an enzymatic digestion with endonucleases Alu I and Sau 3AI. The restriction patterns given by the two enzymes were found suitable for the successful discrimination of the Pyrenean desman from the other species based on species-specific sequence variations. [less ▲]

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See detailWhen morphometrics meets genetics: the case of the hazel dormouse, Muscardinus avellanarius
Mouton, Alice ULg; Renaud, Sabrina; Michaux, Johan ULg

Conference (2014, September 19)

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See detailPostglacial climate changes and rise of three ecotypes of harbour porpoises, Phocoena phocoena, in western Palearctic waters
Fontaine, Michaël; Roland, K.; Calves, I. et al

in Molecular Ecology (2014)

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See detailLa loutre en France et Navarre
Pigneur, Lise-Marie; Marc, Daniel; Fournier, Pascal et al

in Bulletin de liaison des Mammalogistes de Midi-Pyrénées (2014)

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See detailGenetic structure of fragmented southern populations of African Cape buffalo (Syncerus caffer caffer)
Smitz, Nathalie ULg; Cornelis, Daniel; Chardonnet, Philippe et al

in BMC Evolutionary Biology (2014), 14

Background African wildlife experienced a reduction in population size and geographical distribution over the last millennium, particularly since the 19th century as a result of human demographic ... [more ▼]

Background African wildlife experienced a reduction in population size and geographical distribution over the last millennium, particularly since the 19th century as a result of human demographic expansion, wildlife overexploitation, habitat degradation and cattle-borne diseases. In many areas, ungulate populations are now largely confined within a network of loosely connected protected areas. These metapopulations face gene flow restriction and run the risk of genetic diversity erosion. In this context, we assessed the “genetic health” of free ranging southern African Cape buffalo populations (S.c. caffer) and investigated the origins of their current genetic structure. The analyses were based on 264 samples from 6 southern African countries that were genotyped for 14 autosomal and 3 Y-chromosomal microsatellites. Results The analyses differentiated three significant genetic clusters, hereafter referred to as Northern (N), Central (C) and Southern (S) clusters. The results suggest that splitting of the N and C clusters occurred around 6000 to 8400 years ago. Both N and C clusters displayed high genetic diversity (mean allelic richness (Ar) of 7.217, average genetic diversity over loci of 0.594, mean private alleles (Pa) of 11), low differentiation, and an absence of an inbreeding depression signal (mean FIS = 0.037). The third (S) cluster, a tiny population enclosed within a small isolated protected area, likely originated from a more recent isolation and experienced genetic drift (FIS = 0.062, mean Ar = 6.160, Pa = 2). This study also highlighted the impact of translocations between clusters on the genetic structure of several African buffalo populations. Lower differentiation estimates were observed between C and N sampling localities that experienced translocation over the last century. Conclusions We showed that the current genetic structure of southern African Cape buffalo populations results from both ancient and recent processes. The splitting time of N and C clusters suggests that the current pattern results from human-induced factors and/or from the aridification process that occurred during the Holocene period. The more recent S cluster genetic drift probably results of processes that occurred over the last centuries (habitat fragmentation, diseases). Management practices of African buffalo populations should consider the micro-evolutionary changes highlighted in the present study. [less ▲]

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See detailNegative purifying selection drives prion and doppel protein evolution
Tsangaras, K.; Kolokotronis, S.-O.; Ulrich, R. G. et al

in Journal of Molecular Evolution (2014), 79(1-2), 12-20

The prion protein (PrP) when misfolded into the pathogenic conformer PrPSc is the major causative agent of several lethal transmissible spongiform encephalopathies in mammals. Studies of evolutionary ... [more ▼]

The prion protein (PrP) when misfolded into the pathogenic conformer PrPSc is the major causative agent of several lethal transmissible spongiform encephalopathies in mammals. Studies of evolutionary pressure on the corresponding gene using different datasets have yielded conflicting results. In addition, putative PrP or PrP interacting partners with strong similarity to PrP such as the doppel protein have not been examined to determine if the same evolutionary mechanisms apply to prion paralogs or if there are coselected sites that might indicate how and where the proteins interact. We examined several taxonomic groups that contain model organisms of prion diseases focusing on primates, bovids, and an expanded dataset of rodents for selection pressure on the prion gene (PRNP) and doppel gene (PRND) individually and for coevolving sites within. Overall, the results clearly indicate that both proteins are under strong selective constraints with relaxed selection on amino acid residues connecting α-helices 1 and 2. © 2014 Springer Science+Business Media New York. [less ▲]

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See detailNuclear and mitochondrial genetic structure in the Eurasian beaver (Castor fiber) - implications for future reintroductions
Senn, H.; Ogden, R.; Frosch, C. et al

in Evolutionary Applications (2014), 7(6), 645-662

Many reintroduction projects for conservation fail, and there are a large number of factors that may contribute to failure. Genetic analysis can be used to help stack the odds of a reintroduction in ... [more ▼]

Many reintroduction projects for conservation fail, and there are a large number of factors that may contribute to failure. Genetic analysis can be used to help stack the odds of a reintroduction in favour of success, by conducting assessment of source populations to evaluate the possibility of inbreeding and outbreeding depression and by conducting postrelease monitoring. In this study, we use a panel of 306 SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) markers and 487-489 base pairs of mitochondrial DNA control region sequence data to examine 321 individuals from possible source populations of the Eurasian beaver for a reintroduction to Scotland. We use this information to reassess the phylogenetic history of the Eurasian beavers, to examine the genetic legacy of past reintroductions on the Eurasian landmass and to assess the future power of the genetic markers to conduct ongoing monitoring via parentage analysis and individual identification. We demonstrate the capacity of medium density genetic data (hundreds of SNPs) to provide information suitable for applied conservation and discuss the difficulty of balancing the need for high genetic diversity against phylogenetic best fit when choosing source population(s) for reintroduction. © 2014 The Authors. Evolutionary Applications published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. [less ▲]

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