References of "Meuris, Nathalie"
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See detailEvidence for neo-generation of T cells by the thymus after non-myeloablative conditioning.
Castermans, Emilie ULg; Baron, Frédéric ULg; Willems, Evelyne ULg et al

in Haematologica (2008), 93(2), 240-7

BACKGROUND: Background and objective. We investigated immune recovery in 50 patients given either unmanipulated or CD8-depleted allogeneic peripheral blood stem cells after non-myeloablative conditioning ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Background and objective. We investigated immune recovery in 50 patients given either unmanipulated or CD8-depleted allogeneic peripheral blood stem cells after non-myeloablative conditioning. DESIGN AND METHODS: Fifty patients were randomized to receive either CD8-depleted (n=22) or non-manipulated (n=28) peripheral blood stem cells. The median patients age was 57 (range 36-69) years. The conditioning regimen consisted of 2 Gy total body irradiation with or without added fludarabine. Twenty patients received grafts from related donors, 14 from 10/10 HLA-allele matched unrelated donors, and 16 from HLA-mismatched unrelated donors. Graft-versus-host disease pro-phylaxis consisted of mycophenolate mofetil and cyclosporine. Immune recovery during the first year after hematopoietic cell transplantation was assessed by flow cytometry phenotyping, analyses of the diversity of the TCRBV repertoire, and quantification of signal-joint T-cell receptor excision circles (sjTREC). RESULTS: CD8-depletion of the graft reduced the recovery of CD8(+) T-cell counts in the first 6 months following transplantation (p<0.0001) but had no significant impact on the restoration of other T-cell subsets. Both sjTREC concentration and CD3(+) T-cell counts increased significantly between day 100 and 365 (p=0.010 and p=0.0488, respectively) demonstrating neo-production of T cells by the thymus. Factors associated with high sjTREC concentration 1 year after transplantation included an HLA-matched unrelated donor (p=0.029), a high content of T cells in the graft (p=0.002), and the absence of chronic graft-versus-host disease (p<0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that while immune recovery is mainly driven by peripheral expansion of the graft-contained mature T cells during the first months after non-myeloablative transplantation, T-cell neo-generation by the thymus plays an important role in long term immune reconstitution in transplanted patients. [less ▲]

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See detailDespite inhibition of hematopoietic progenitor cell growth in vitro, the tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib does not impair engraftment of human CD133+ cells into NOD/SCIDbeta2mNull mice.
Pirson, Laurence ULg; Baron, Frédéric ULg; Meuris, Nathalie ULg et al

in Stem Cells (2006), 24(7), 1814-21

There is potential interest for combining allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), and particularly allogeneic HCT with a nonmyeloablative regimen, to the tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib ... [more ▼]

There is potential interest for combining allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), and particularly allogeneic HCT with a nonmyeloablative regimen, to the tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib (Glivec; Novartis, Basel, Switzerland, http://www.novartis.com) in order to maximize anti-leukemic activity against Philadelphia chromosome-positive leukemias. However, because imatinib inhibits c-kit, the stem cell factor receptor, it could interfere with bone marrow engraftment. In this study, we examined the impact of imatinib on normal progenitor cell function. Imatinib decreased the colony-forming capacity of mobilized peripheral blood human CD133(+) cells but not that of long-term culture-initiating cells. Imatinib also decreased the proliferation of cytokine-stimulated CD133(+) cells but did not induce apoptosis of these cells. Expression of very late antigen (VLA)-4, VLA-5, and CXCR4 of CD133(+) cells was not modified by imatinib, but imatinib decreased the ability of CD133(+) cells to migrate. Finally, imatinib did not decrease engraftment of CD133(+) cells into irradiated nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient/beta2m(null) mice conditioned with 3 or 1 Gy total body irradiation. In summary, our results suggest that, despite inhibition of hematopoietic progenitor cell growth in vitro, imatinib does not interfere with hematopoietic stem cell engraftment. [less ▲]

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See detailT-cell reconstitution after unmanipulated, CD8-depleted or CD34-selected nonmyeloablative peripheral blood stem-cell transplantation.
Baron, Frédéric ULg; Schaaf-Lafontaine, Nicole ULg; Humblet-Baron, Stéphanie ULg et al

in Transplantation (2003), 76(12), 1705-13

BACKGROUND: We have previously shown that CD8 depletion or CD34 selection of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) reduced the incidence of acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) after nonmyeloablative stem ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: We have previously shown that CD8 depletion or CD34 selection of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) reduced the incidence of acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) after nonmyeloablative stem-cell transplantation (NMSCT). In this study, we analyze the effect of CD8 depletion or CD34 selection of the graft on early T-cell reconstitution. METHODS: Nonmyeloablative conditioning regimen consisted in 2 Gy total-body irradiation (TBI) alone, 2 Gy TBI and fludarabine, or cyclophosphamide and fludarabine. Patients 1 to 18 received unmanipulated PBSC, patients 19 to 29 CD8-depleted PBSC, and patients 30 to 35 CD34-selected PBSC. RESULTS: T-cell counts, and particularly CD4+ and CD4CD45RA+ counts, remained low the first 6 months after nonmyeloablative stem-cell transplantation (NMSCT) in all patients. CD34 selection (P<0.0001) but not CD8 depletion of PBSC significantly decreased T-cell chimerism. Donor T-cell count was similar in unmanipulated compared with CD8-depleted PBSC recipients but was significantly lower in CD34-selected PBSC recipients (P=0.0012). T cells of recipient origin remained stable over time in unmanipulated and CD8-depleted PBSC patients but expanded in some CD34-selected PBSC recipients between day 28 and 100 after transplant. Moreover, whereas CD8 depletion only decreased CD8+ counts (P<0.047), CD34 selection reduced CD3+(P<0.001), CD8+(P<0.016), CD4+ (P<0.001), and CD4+CD45RA+ (P<0.001) cell counts. T-cell repertoire was restricted in all patients on day 100 after hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation but was even more limited after CD34 selection (P=0.002). CONCLUSIONS: Despite of the persistence of a significant number of T cells of recipient origin, T-cell counts were low the first 6 months after NMSCT. Moreover, contrary with CD8 depletion of the graft that only affects CD8+ lymphocyte counts, CD34 selection dramatically decreased both CD8 and CD4 counts. [less ▲]

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