References of "Meulemans, Thierry"
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See detailMemory consolidation in children with Specific Language Impairment: Delayed gains and susceptibility to interference in implicit sequence learning
Desmottes, Lise ULg; Maillart, Christelle ULg; Meulemans, Thierry ULg

in Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology (in press)

Introduction: In this study, the time course of the procedural learning of a visuomotor sequence skill was followed over a 24-hour and a 1-week time period in children with and without specific language ... [more ▼]

Introduction: In this study, the time course of the procedural learning of a visuomotor sequence skill was followed over a 24-hour and a 1-week time period in children with and without specific language impairment (SLI). Two aspects of memory consolidation in implicit sequence learning were examined: the evolution of post-training gains in sequence knowledge (Experiment 1) and the susceptibility to interference (Experiment 2). Method and Results: In the first experiment, 18 children with SLI and 17 control children matched for sex, age, and nonverbal intelligence completed a serial reaction-time (SRT) task and were tested 24 hours and 1 week after practicing. The two groups of children attained an equal level of sequence knowledge in the training session, but the children with SLI lacked the consolidation gains displayed by the control children in the two post-training sessions. Working with a new group of children, 17 with SLI and 17 control peers, Experiment 2 examined resistance to interference by introducing a second sequence 15 minutes after the first training session. Similar results were obtained for the performance of both groups in the training session. However, although the performance of the control group improved in the post-training sessions, the performance of the SLI group deteriorated significantly during the consolidation phase due to the interfering sequence. Conclusion: These findings suggest that the consolidation phase of sequence learning is impaired in children with SLI. [less ▲]

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See detailWorking Memory Assessment: Construct Validity of the Brown-Peterson Test
Geurten, Marie ULg; VINCENT, Eric ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg et al

in Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science = Revue Canadienne des Sciences du Comportement (in press)

The classical Brown-Peterson task is generally supposed to assess working memory capacities. To date, however, the construct validity of the task remains mostly unexamined. In this context, the aim of the ... [more ▼]

The classical Brown-Peterson task is generally supposed to assess working memory capacities. To date, however, the construct validity of the task remains mostly unexamined. In this context, the aim of the present study was to demonstrate the convergent and the divergent validity as well as the clinical and the developmental sensitivity of a computerized version of the Brown-Peterson test. A group of 726 French-speaking participants aged from 18 to 86 years and 47 patients who had sustained a traumatic brain injury (TBI) were administered the Brown-Peterson task and various other cognitive tasks assessing executive functioning, verbal and visual memory, or processing speed. The correlation analyses revealed the good convergent of the task, which was shown to be able to distinguish between participants with TBI and control participants. We found an effect of age and education level on the different scores recorded for the Brown-Peterson test. Normative data taking into account the influence of the latter variables were thus provided. On the whole, these findings seem to confirm the validity of the Brown-Peterson task as a tool to assess working memory abilities. [less ▲]

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See detailImplicit spoken words and motor sequences learning are impaired in children with Specific Language Impairment
Desmottes, Lise ULg; Meulemans, Thierry ULg; Maillart, Christelle ULg

in Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society (in press)

Objective. This study aims to compare verbal and motor implicit sequence learning abilities in children with and without Specific Language Impairment (SLI). Methods. Forty-eight children (24 control and ... [more ▼]

Objective. This study aims to compare verbal and motor implicit sequence learning abilities in children with and without Specific Language Impairment (SLI). Methods. Forty-eight children (24 control and 24 SLI) were administered the Serial Search Task (SST), which enables the simultaneous assessment of implicit spoken words and visuomotor sequences learning. Results. Results showed that control children implicitly learned both the spoken words as well as the motor sequences. In contrast, children with SLI showed deficits in both types of learning. Moreover, correlational analyses revealed that SST performance was linked with grammatical abilities in control children but with lexical abilities in children with SLI. Conclusion. Overall, this pattern of results supports the procedural deficit hypothesis and suggests that domain general implicit sequence learning is impaired in SLI. [less ▲]

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See detailMirror-drawing skill in children with Specific Language Impairment: Improving generalization by incorporating variability in the practice session
Desmottes, Lise ULg; Maillart, Christelle ULg; Meulemans, Thierry ULg

in Child Neuropsychology : A Journal on Normal & Abnormal Development in Childhood & Adolescence (in press)

This study aimed to investigate the procedural deficit hypothesis (PDH) in children with Specific Language Impairment (SLI) by using a mirror-drawing task, a sensorimotor adaptation paradigm that does not ... [more ▼]

This study aimed to investigate the procedural deficit hypothesis (PDH) in children with Specific Language Impairment (SLI) by using a mirror-drawing task, a sensorimotor adaptation paradigm that does not involve sequence learning and has never before been used in SLI. Thirty school-aged children with SLI matched to 30 control children had to trace several figures seen only in mirror-reversed view in two learning sessions separated by a one-week delay. Two practice conditions were compared: a constant condition in which children had to trace the same figure throughout the learning trials, and a variable one in which they had to trace different figures in each trial. Results revealed a similar learning pattern between SLI and TD children in both practice conditions, suggesting that initial learning for a nonsequential procedural task is preserved in SLI. However, children with SLI generalized the mirror-drawing skill in the same way as control children only if there was variability in the way the material was trained (variable practice). No significant schedule effects were observed in the control group. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Childhood Executive Function Inventory (CHEXI): Confirmatory Factor Analyses and Cross-Cultural Clinical Validity in a Sample of 8- to 11-Year-Old Children
Catale, Corinne ULg; Meulemans, Thierry ULg; Thorell, Lisa B.

in Journal of Attention Disorders (in press)

The Childhood Executive Functioning Inventory (CHEXI) is a new rating instrument for executive functioning developed by Thorell and Nyberg (2008). Through exploratory factor analyses, this inventory has ... [more ▼]

The Childhood Executive Functioning Inventory (CHEXI) is a new rating instrument for executive functioning developed by Thorell and Nyberg (2008). Through exploratory factor analyses, this inventory has been shown to tap into working memory and inhibition-related behaviors in young children. In this study, we present the psychometric characteristics of the French adaptation of the CHEXI in 8- to 11-year-old children. In addition, we explore the cross-cultural validity of the CHEXI in discriminating between children with ADHD and normally developing children in two culturally different samples (Belgian and Swedish). Confirmatory factor analyses replicated the two-factor solution, referred to as inhibition and working memory, that was identified in the original study with Swedish children. Supplementary analyses indicated that both subscales have good psychometric properties. From a clinical point of view, the CHEXI was found to discriminate, with high sensitivity and specificity, between children with ADHD and normally developing controls in both cultural samples. Cross-cultural clinical implications are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailVisual artificial grammar learning in children with SLI : Is variability the key ?
Desmottes, Lise ULg; Maillart, Christelle ULg; Demelenne, Pauline et al

Poster (2016, June 18)

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See detailLater learning stages in procedural memory are impaired in children with Specific Language Impairment
Desmottes, Lise ULg; Meulemans, Thierry ULg; Maillart, Christelle ULg

in Research in Developmental Disabilities (2016)

Background According to the Procedural Deficit Hypothesis (PDH), difficulties in the procedural memory system may contribute to the language difficulties encountered by children with Specific Language ... [more ▼]

Background According to the Procedural Deficit Hypothesis (PDH), difficulties in the procedural memory system may contribute to the language difficulties encountered by children with Specific Language Impairment (SLI). Most studies investigating the PDH have used the sequence learning paradigm; however these studies have principally focused on initial sequence learning in a single practice session. Aims The present study sought to extend these investigations by assessing the consolidation stage and longer-term retention of implicit sequence-specific knowledge in 42 children with or without SLI. Methods and procedures Both groups of children completed a serial reaction time task and were tested 24 h and one week after practice. Outcomes and results Results showed that children with SLI succeeded as well as children with typical development (TD) in the early acquisition stage of the sequence learning task. However, as training blocks progressed, only TD children improved their sequence knowledge while children with SLI did not appear to evolve any more. Moreover, children with SLI showed a lack of the consolidation gains in sequence knowledge displayed by the TD children. Conclusions and implications Overall, these results were in line with the predictions of the PDH and suggest that later learning stages in procedural memory are impaired in SLI. [less ▲]

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See detailStudying Self-Awareness in Children: Validation of the Questionnaire of Executive Functioning (QEF)
Geurten, Marie ULg; Catale, Corinne ULg; Geurten, Claire ULg et al

in Clinical Neuropsychologist (The) (2016)

Objective: People with accurate representations of their own cognitive functioning (i.e., cognitive self-awareness) tend to use appropriate strategies to regulate their behavior. Due to the lack of ... [more ▼]

Objective: People with accurate representations of their own cognitive functioning (i.e., cognitive self-awareness) tend to use appropriate strategies to regulate their behavior. Due to the lack of appropriate instruments, few studies have examined the development of this ability among children. Method: This study tested the measurement properties of the self-rating and other-rating forms of the Questionnaire of Executive Functioning (QEF), designed to tap children’s knowledge of their executive functioning. Specifically, the construct, convergent, and discriminant validities were investigated and a self-other discrepancy score was computed to assess children’s executive self-awareness. Participants were 317 children aged 7 to 14 years old. Results: Confirmatory factor analyses carried out on the QEF confirmed the eight-factor structure of both versions. There were significant correlations between the QEF and the parent versions of the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function, the Dysexecutive Questionnaire for Children, and the Childhood Executive Functioning Inventory. Both forms of the QEF were able to distinguish between children who had sustained a traumatic brain injury (TBI) and control participants. A statistical difference was observed between the TBI and control groups on this score, suggesting that TBI may trigger self-awareness impairments in children. Conclusion: The good psychometric properties of the two forms of the QEF were established. Furthermore, results of the analyses carried out on the different discrepancy scores seem to indicate that the QEF could help clinicians to detect patients with self-awareness deficits. [less ▲]

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See detailExecutive functions deficits after severe traumatic brain injury: The GREFEX study
Azouvi, Philippe; Vallat-Azouvi, Claire; Joseph, Pierre-Alain et al

in Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation (2016), 31(3), 10-20

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See detailImplicit learning: A way to improve visual search in spatial neglect?
Wansard, Murielle ULg; Geurten, Marie ULg; Colson, Catherine et al

in Consciousness & Cognition (2016)

Studies have shown that neglect patients are able to use stimulus regularities to orient faster toward the neglected side, without necessarily being aware of that information, or at the very least without ... [more ▼]

Studies have shown that neglect patients are able to use stimulus regularities to orient faster toward the neglected side, without necessarily being aware of that information, or at the very least without being able to verbalize their knowledge. In order to better control for the involvement of explicit processes, the present study sought to test neglect patients’ ability to detect more complex associations between stimuli using tasks similar to those used in implicit learning studies. Our results demonstrate that neglect patients had difficulties implicitly learning complex associations, contrary to what we found with controls. The possible influence of attentional and working memory impairments are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailPsychometric properties of the Questionnaire of Executive Self-Awareness (QESA) for Children
Geurten, Marie ULg; Catale, Corinne ULg; Geurten, Claire ULg et al

in Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society (2016)

Objective: People with accurate representations of their own cognitive functioning (i.e., cognitive self-awareness) tend to use appropriate strategies to regulate their behavior. Due to the lack of ... [more ▼]

Objective: People with accurate representations of their own cognitive functioning (i.e., cognitive self-awareness) tend to use appropriate strategies to regulate their behavior. Due to the lack of appropriate instruments, few studies have examined the development of this ability among children. Method: This study tested the measurement properties of the self-rating and other-rating forms of the Questionnaire of Executive Self-Awareness (QESA), designed to tap children’s knowledge of their executive functioning. Participants were 317 children aged 7 to 14 years old. Results: Confirmatory factor analyses carried out on the QESA confirmed the eight-factor structure of both versions. There were significant correlations between the QESA and the parent versions of the BRIEF, DEX-C, and CHEXI. Both forms of the QESA were able to distinguish between children who had sustained a traumatic brain injury (TBI) and control participants. A self-other discrepancy score was computed to assess children’s executive self-awareness. A statistical difference was observed between the TBI and control groups on this score, suggesting that TBI may trigger self-awareness impairments in children. Conclusion: The good psychometric properties of the two forms of the QESA were established. Furthermore, results of the analyses carried on the different discrepancy scores seem to indicate that the QESA could help clinicians to detect patients with self-awareness deficits. [less ▲]

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See detailInvolvement of Executive Functions in Children’s Metamemory
Geurten, Marie ULg; Catale, Corinne ULg; Meulemans, Thierry ULg

in Applied Cognitive Psychology (2016), 30(1), 70-80

This experiment examined how knowledge of memory strategies and of memory functioning improves during childhood and what variables are involved in this development. Three main aspects of metamemory were ... [more ▼]

This experiment examined how knowledge of memory strategies and of memory functioning improves during childhood and what variables are involved in this development. Three main aspects of metamemory were assessed based on the performance of a group of 100 children (aged 4, 6, 9 and 11 years) on a battery of executive tasks. At the same time, the influence of variables such as intelligence, vocabulary and parental education level was also investigated. Results of mediation analyses reveal that the relation between children’s age and internal strategy knowledge was partially mediated by working memory skills but that executive functions did not mediate the impact of chronological age on children’s knowledge of external strategies or of memory functioning. Additionally, verbal fluency predicted internal and external strategy knowledge. Implications for general learning theories in childhood are discussed [less ▲]

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See detailProcedural learning, consolidation, and transfer of a new skill in Developmental Coordination Disorder
Lejeune, Caroline ULg; Wansard, Murielle ULg; Geurten, Marie ULg et al

in Child Neuropsychology : A Journal on Normal & Abnormal Development in Childhood & Adolescence (2016), 22(2),

The aim of this study was to explore the differences in procedural learning abilities between children with DCD and typically developing children by investigating the steps that lead to skill ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to explore the differences in procedural learning abilities between children with DCD and typically developing children by investigating the steps that lead to skill automatization (i.e., the stages of fast learning, consolidation, and slow learning). Transfer of the skill to a new situation was also assessed. We tested 34 children aged 6–12 years with and without DCD on a perceptuomotor adaptation task, a form of procedural learning that is thought to involve the cerebellum and the basal ganglia (regions whose impairment has been associated with DCD) but also other brain areas including frontal regions. The results showed similar rates of learning, consolidation, and transfer in DCD and control children. However, the DCD children's performance remained slower than that of controls throughout the procedural task and they reached a lower asymptotic performance level; the difficulties observed at the outset did not diminish with practice. [less ▲]

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See detailApprentissage implicite d'habiletés perceptivo-motrices
Meulemans, Thierry ULg

Conference (2015, October 08)

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See detailWhat can unilateral neglect tell us about the structure of visuospatial working memory?
Wansard, Murielle ULg; Meulemans, Thierry ULg

Conference (2015, May 28)

Some studies have proposed that deficits in visuospatial working memory (WM) could exacerbate the neglect syndrome, as reflected in the patients’ tendency to repeatedly search through items located on the ... [more ▼]

Some studies have proposed that deficits in visuospatial working memory (WM) could exacerbate the neglect syndrome, as reflected in the patients’ tendency to repeatedly search through items located on the right, as if they did not realize that they had previously examined the rightward locations favoured by their lateral attentional bias (e.g., Husain et al., 2001). However, we have recently shown that the efficiency level of spatial WM, as evaluated by the Corsi Block test, might not be sufficient to explain perseveration and omission behaviors in neglect patients (Wansard et al., 2014). Moreover, it appears that, until now, research has mostly focused on spatial sequential WM, addressing the study of visuospatial WM through tasks involving the recall of serial order. We will present data suggesting that other subcomponents of visuospatial WM, such as simultaneous-spatial or visual WM (Logie, 1995), could also be involved in the neglect syndrome. We will also present evidence of a double dissociation between the two aspects of visuospatial WM (simultaneous vs sequential) in neglect patients, confirming the dual dimension of visuospatial WM (Wansard et al., 2015). [less ▲]

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