References of "Mestdagt, Mélanie"
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See detailImplant comprising a core and a tube encasing the core
Donnez, Jacques; Van Langendonkt, Anne; Defrère, Sylvie et al

Patent (2012)

The present invention relates to an implant comprising: - a core material comprising polydimethylsiloxane or at least one hydrogel polymer; - a tube encasing said core material comprising an ethylene ... [more ▼]

The present invention relates to an implant comprising: - a core material comprising polydimethylsiloxane or at least one hydrogel polymer; - a tube encasing said core material comprising an ethylene vinyl acetate polymer or at least one hydrogel polymer; - a sealant for closure of the open ends of said tube comprising polydimethylsiloxane or a mono-, di-, or triacetoxy derivative thereof, or at least one hydrogel polymer; and - at least one active ingredient; wherein said at least one active ingredient is selected from the group comprising celecoxib, sulindac, tamoxifen, oestrogen, oestradiol, ethinyl oestradiol, mestranol, dienogest, norgestrel, levonorgestrel, desogestrel, norgestimate, ethynodiol diacetate, leuprorelin, buserelin, gonrelin, triptorelin, nafarelin, deslorelin, histrelin, and supprelin; and with the proviso that when the sealant is said at least one hydrogelpolymer, the core material comprises polydimethylsiloxane. Furthermore, the invention relates to an implant for use as a medicament. In particular, the invention relates to an implant for use in the treatment of endometriosis. [less ▲]

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See detailImplant comprising a core and a tube encasing the core
Donnez, Jacques; Van Langendonkt, Anne; Defrère, Stéphanie et al

Patent (2012)

The present invention relates to an implant comprising: - a core material comprising polydimethylsiloxane or at least one hydrogel polymer; - a tube encasing said core material comprising an ethylene ... [more ▼]

The present invention relates to an implant comprising: - a core material comprising polydimethylsiloxane or at least one hydrogel polymer; - a tube encasing said core material comprising an ethylene vinyl acetate polymer or at least one hydrogel polymer; - a sealant for closure of the open ends of said tube comprising polydimethylsiloxane or a mono-, di-, or triacetoxy derivative thereof, or at least one hydrogel polymer; and - at least one active ingredient; with the proviso that when the sealant is said at least one hydrogel polymer, the core material comprises polydimethylsiloxane. Furthermore, the invention relates to an implant for use as a medicament. In particular, the invention relates to an implant for use in the treatment of endometriosis. [less ▲]

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See detailRegulation of CXCL8/IL-8 expression by Zonula Occludens-1 in human breast cancer cells.
Brysse, Anne ULg; Mestdagt, Mélanie ULg; Polette, Myriam et al

in Molecular Cancer Research (2012), 10(1), 121-32

Accumulating data now suggest that ZO-1, once delocalized from tight junctions, could be implicated in the regulation of tumor promoting genes. Because of their major implication in different steps of ... [more ▼]

Accumulating data now suggest that ZO-1, once delocalized from tight junctions, could be implicated in the regulation of tumor promoting genes. Because of their major implication in different steps of tumor progression, we investigated here the influence of ZO-1 on chemokines expression in breast cancer cells. Using GeneArray analysis to compare chemokine mRNA expression in breast tumor cells transfected with a siRNA against ZO-1, we identified CXCL-8/IL-8 as a major potential target of ZO-1 signaling, being strongly downregulated following ZO-1 siRNA transfection. Examining further the relationship between ZO-1 and IL-8, we first demonstrated that CXCL8/IL-8 expression correlates with a relocalization of ZO-1 in several breast cancer cell lines. Moreover, CXCL8/IL-8 is downregulated in invasive BT549 cells transfected with 3 different ZO-1 siRNA and overexpressed in non-invasive BT20 and SKBR3 cells transfected with vectors expressing ZO-1. We also provide evidence for an activation of the CXCL8/IL-8 promoter by ZO-1. Finally, we demonstrate that the regulation of CXCL8/IL-8 by ZO-1 is independent of the beta-catenin pathway. Our results thus clearly demonstrate an implication of ZO-1 in CXCL8/IL-8 regulation. Because of the major implications of CXCL8/IL-8 in tumor invasion, such a regulation could play an important role in breast cancer progression. [less ▲]

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See detailIn vivo biocompatibility of three potential intraperitoneal implants
Defrère, Sylvie; Mestdagt, Mélanie ULg; Riva, Raphaël ULg et al

in Macromolecular Bioscience (2011), 11(10), 1335-45

The intraperitoneal biocompatibility of PDMS, polyHEMA and pEVA was investigated in rats, rabbits and rhesus monkeys. No inflammation was evidenced by hematological analyses and measurement of ... [more ▼]

The intraperitoneal biocompatibility of PDMS, polyHEMA and pEVA was investigated in rats, rabbits and rhesus monkeys. No inflammation was evidenced by hematological analyses and measurement of inflammatory markers throughout the experiment and by post-mortem examination of the pelvic cavity. After 3 or 6 months, histological analysis revealed fibrous tissue encapsulating PDMS and PEVA implants in all species and polyHEMA implants in rabbits and monkeys. Calcium deposits were observed inside polyHEMA implants. The intraperitoneal biocompatibility of all 3 polymers makes them suitable for the design of drug delivery systems, which may be of great interest for pathologies confined to the pelvic cavity. [less ▲]

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See detailIs the baboon model appropriate for endometriosis studies?
Dehoux, Jean-Paul; Defrère, Silvie; Squifflet, Jean et al

in Fertility and Sterility (2011), 96(3), 728-7333

Objective To determinethe prevalence of spontaneous endometriosis andthe incidence of induced endometriosis after endocervical canal resection in baboons. Design Induction and follow-up of endometriosis ... [more ▼]

Objective To determinethe prevalence of spontaneous endometriosis andthe incidence of induced endometriosis after endocervical canal resection in baboons. Design Induction and follow-up of endometriosis in baboons, which is one of the primate species that develop spontaneous endometriosis. Forty-one baboons were checked for the presence of spontaneous endometriosis. We then attempted to induce endometriosis in 30 of them by endocervical canal resection. Setting Institute of Primate Research, Nairobi, Kenya, and Catholic University of Louvain, Brussels, Belgium. Animal(s) Forty-one baboons were checked for spontaneous endometriosis and 30 of them were used to develop a model of induced endometriosis. Intervention(s) A total of 41 baboons underwent diagnostic laparoscopy for 10 months. In a first step, 30 of this number subsequently underwent endocervical canal resection. In a second step, 20 of the 30 underwent uterine horn resection. Main Outcome Measure(s) Follow-up by laparoscopy. Result(s) Two of the 41 baboons were diagnosed with spontaneous endometriosis (4.8%). Twelve months after the surgical procedure to induce endometriosis, 8 of 29 animals presented with endometriotic lesions diagnosed by using laparoscopy and confirmed by histologic examination. The incidence of induced endometriosis in our model was thus 27.6%. In 2 baboons, endometriosis disappeared over time, resulting in a final rate of 20.7% (6/29). Conclusion(s) The rate of spontaneous endometriosis is very low (4.8%). Endometriosis can be induced (with a rate of just 27.6%) by endocervical canal resection to stimulate retrograde menstruation. [less ▲]

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See detailAbsence of aromatase protein and mRNA expression in endometriosis.
Colette, S.; Lousse, J. C.; Defrère, S. et al

in Human Reproduction (2009), 24(9), 2133-41

BACKGROUND: Aromatase has been reported to be involved in estrogen biosynthesis and expressed in eutopic and ectopic endometrium of endometriosis patients. The objective of the present study was to ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Aromatase has been reported to be involved in estrogen biosynthesis and expressed in eutopic and ectopic endometrium of endometriosis patients. The objective of the present study was to investigate its expression and localization in three distinct types of endometriosis. METHODS: Human peritoneal, ovarian and rectovaginal endometriotic lesions and matched eutopic endometrium were collected from patients during laparoscopy. Aromatase protein localization (immunohistochemistry, n = 63) and mRNA expression [quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR), n = 64] were assessed. RESULTS: No aromatase protein was detected by immunohistochemistry in either the glandular or stromal compartment of endometriotic lesions or eutopic endometrium, while it was strong in placental syncytiotrophoblasts, granulosa and internal theca cells from pre-ovulatory follicles, and luteal cells from corpus luteum. By Q-PCR, low but discernible levels of aromatase expression were found in endometriomas, probably due to follicular expression. Transcripts for aromatase were barely detectable in only a few peritoneal and rectovaginal endometriotic lesions, and a few eutopic endometrium samples, probably due to contaminating surrounding tissues (adipose tissue, intact peritoneum). CONCLUSIONS: Unlike previous studies, we observed no aromatase protein in any of the endometriosis types, and barely detectable aromatase mRNA expression, suggesting that locally produced aromatase (within endometriotic lesions) may be less implicated in endometriosis development than previously postulated. Potential factors responsible for these discrepancies are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailReduction of brain metastases in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1-deficient mice with transgenic ocular tumors
Maillard, Catherine ULg; Bouquet, C.; Petitjean, Marie et al

in Carcinogenesis (2008), 29(11), 2236-2242

Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 is known to play a paradoxical positive role in tumor angiogenesis, but its contribution to metastatic spread remains unclear. We studied the impact of PAI-1 deficiency ... [more ▼]

Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 is known to play a paradoxical positive role in tumor angiogenesis, but its contribution to metastatic spread remains unclear. We studied the impact of PAI-1 deficiency in a transgenic mouse model of ocular tumors originating from retinal epithelial cells and leading to brain metastasis (TRP-1/SV40 Tag mice). PAI-1 deficiency did not affect primary tumor growth or vascularization, but was associated with a smaller number of brain metastases. Brain metastases were found to be differentially distributed between the two genotypes. PAI-1-deficient mice displayed mostly secondary foci expanding from local optic nerve infiltration, whereas wild-type animals displayed more disseminated nodules in the scissura and meningeal spaces. SuperArray GEArray analyses aiming to detect molecules potentially compensating for PAI-1 deficiency demonstrated an increase in fibroblast growth factor-1 (FGF-1) gene expression in primary tumors, which was confirmed by RT-PCR and western blotting. Our data provide the first evidence of a key role for PAI-1 in a spontaneous model of metastasis, and suggest that angiogenic factors, such as FGF-1, may be important for primary tumor growth and may compensate for the absence of PAI-1. They identify PAI-1 and FGF-1 as important targets for combined anti-tumor strategies. [less ▲]

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See detailDEVELOPMENT OF AN INTRAPERITONEAL IMPLANT FOR THE ENDOMETRIOSIS TREATMENT
Krier, Fabrice ULg; Nizet, Dominique; Riva, Raphaël ULg et al

Poster (2008)

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See detailbeta-Catenin and ZO-1: Shuttle molecules involved in tumor invasion-associated epithelial-mesenchymal transition processes
Polette, M.; Mestdagt, Mélanie ULg; Bindels, Sandrine ULg et al

in Cells Tissues Organs (2007), 185(1-3), 61-65

The cytoplasmic/nuclear relocalization of beta-catenin and ZO-1 from the adherens and tight junctions are common processes of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) associated with tumor invasion ... [more ▼]

The cytoplasmic/nuclear relocalization of beta-catenin and ZO-1 from the adherens and tight junctions are common processes of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) associated with tumor invasion. Data are now accumulating to demonstrate that these molecules, which shuttle between the plasma membrane and the nucleus or the cytosol, are involved in signaling pathways, and contribute to the regulation of genes such as vimentin or matrix metalloproteinase-14 which are turned on during EMT. Copyright (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel. [less ▲]

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See detailRegulation of vimentin by SIP1 in human epithelial breast tumor cells
Bindels, Sandrine ULg; Mestdagt, Mélanie ULg; Van de Walle, C. et al

in Oncogene (2006), 25(36), 4975-4985

The expression of Smad interacting protein-1 (SIP1; ZEB2) and the de novo expression of vimentin are frequently involved in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transitions (EMTs) under both normal and pathological ... [more ▼]

The expression of Smad interacting protein-1 (SIP1; ZEB2) and the de novo expression of vimentin are frequently involved in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transitions (EMTs) under both normal and pathological conditions. In the present study, we investigated the potential role of SIP1 in the regulation of vimentin during the EMT associated with breast tumor cell migration and invasion. Examining several breast tumor cell lines displaying various degrees of invasiveness, we found SIP1 and vimentin expression only in invasive cell lines. Also, using a model of cell migration with human mammary MCF10A cells, we showed that SIP1 is induced specifically in vimentin-positive migratory cells. Furthermore, transfection of SIP1 cDNA in MCF10A cells increased their vimentin expression both at the mRNA and protein levels and enhanced their migratory abilities in Boyden Chamber assays. Inversely, inhibition of SIP1 expression by RNAi strategies in BT-549 cells and MCF10A cells decreased vimentin expression. We also showed that SIP1 transfection did not activate the TOP-FLASH reporter system, suggesting that the beta-catenin/TCF pathway is not implicated in the regulation of vimentin by SIP1. Our results therefore implicate SIP1 in the regulation of vimentin observed in the EMT associated with breast tumor cell migration, a pathway that may contribute to the metastatic progression of breast cancer. [less ▲]

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See detailTransactivation of MCP-1/CCL2 by beta-catenin/TCF-4 in human breast cancer cells
Mestdagt, Mélanie ULg; Polette, M.; Buttice, G. et al

in International Journal of Cancer = Journal International du Cancer (2006), 118(1), 35-42

The loss of E-cadherin expression and the translocation of beta-catenin to the nucleus are frequently associated with the metastatic conversion of epithelial cells. In the nucleus, beta-catenin binds to ... [more ▼]

The loss of E-cadherin expression and the translocation of beta-catenin to the nucleus are frequently associated with the metastatic conversion of epithelial cells. In the nucleus, beta-catenin binds to the TCF/LEF-1 (T-cell factor/ lymphoid enhancer factor) transcription factor family resulting in the activation of several genes, some of them having important implications in tumour progression. In our study, we investigated the potential regulation of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2) expression by the beta-catenin/TCF pathway. This CC-chemokine has been implicated in tumour progression events such as angiogenesis or tumour associated macrophage (TAM) infiltration. We thus demonstrated that MCP-1 expression correlates with the reorganization of the E-cadherin/beta-catenin complexes. Indeed, MCP-1 was expressed by invasive breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231, BT549 and Hs578T), which do not express E-cadherin but was not produced by noninvasive breast cancer cell lines (MCF7 and T47D) expressing high level of E-cadherin. In addition, the MCP-1 promoter was activated in BT549 breast cancer cells transfected with beta-catenin and TCF-4 cDNAs. The MCP-1 mRNA level was similarly upregulated. Moreover, we showed that MCP-1 mRNA was downregulated after transfection with a siRNA against beta-catenin in both BT549 and Hs578T cells. Our results therefore identify MCP-1 as a target of the beta-catenin/TCF/LEF pathway in breast tumour cells, a regulation which could play a key role in breast tumour progression. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [less ▲]

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See detailTransactivation of vimentin by beta-catenin in human breast cancer cells
Gilles, Christine ULg; Polette, M.; Mestdagt, Mélanie ULg et al

in Cancer Research (2003), 63(10), 2658-2664

The cytoplasmic and nuclear redistribution of beta-catenin and the de novo expression of vimentin are frequently involved in the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition associated with increased invasive ... [more ▼]

The cytoplasmic and nuclear redistribution of beta-catenin and the de novo expression of vimentin are frequently involved in the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition associated with increased invasive/migratory properties of epithelial cells. Because beta-catenin can act as a coactivator of transcription through its binding to the T-cell factor (TCF)/lymphoid enhancer factor 1 transcription factor family, we have explored the possibility that beta-catenin/TCF could directly transactivate vimentin. We first compared vimentin expression in relation with the localization of beta-catenin in eight breast cancer cell lines displaying various degrees of invasiveness and in a model of cell migration using human mammary MCF10A cells. We could thus show a cytoplasmic and/or nuclear distribution of beta-catenin in invasive/migratory cells expressing vimentin, but not in noninvasive/stationary vimentin-negative cell lines. In addition, the human vimentin promoter was found to be up-regulated by beta-catenin and TCF-4 cotransfection. Varying with the cellular background, a diminution of this up-regulation was observed when the putative beta-catenin/TCF binding site of the vimentin promoter was mutated. Our results therefore demonstrate that the vimentin promoter is a target of the beta-catenin/TCF pathway and strongly suggest an implication of this regulation in epithelial cell migration/invasion. [less ▲]

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