References of "Menzer, Linda"
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See detailSwitching to the Dark Side: Repositioning of Polyglutamine Repeat Promotes Amyloid Fibril Formation by the Model Protein, β-Lactamase BlaP
Thorn, David ULg; Pain, Coralie ULg; Scarafone, Natacha et al

Conference (2013, November 20)

Background: The expansion of polyglutamine (polyQ) repeats is associated with an increased propensity of the protein to aggregate into amyloid fibrils. There are ten human proteins presently known within ... [more ▼]

Background: The expansion of polyglutamine (polyQ) repeats is associated with an increased propensity of the protein to aggregate into amyloid fibrils. There are ten human proteins presently known within which polyQ expansion above a threshold length, e.g. 35-50 residues, leads to ten distinct neurodegenerative disorders [1], the most well-known being Huntington’s disease. While repeat length, aggregation, and disease are well correlated, recent studies suggest the non-polyQ regions of these proteins can also play a significant role, both preventative and facilitative, in the aggregation process. With the aim of exploring this role in more detail, we have engineered chimeric proteins via the insertion of polyQ repeats of various length (23, 30, 55, 79 Q) into two sites of antibiotic resistance enzyme BlaP β-lactamase from Bacillus licheniformis 749/C [2]. Questions addressed: How does polyQ repeat position affect the structure, stability and aggregation of polyQ proteins? Methods: Aggregation kinetics determined by monitoring the decrease in soluble protein fraction over time. Aggregate morphology examined by transmission electron microscopy. Protein stability derived from thermal or chemical unfolding transitions monitored by far-UV CD and intrinsic fluorescence. Results and discussion: PolyQ insertion at either of the two positions led to a decrease in thermodynamic stability that was largely independent of polyQ length. Chimeras with polyQ insertions at position 216 were destabilised to a much greater extent than those with insertions at position 197. The reduced stability of the 216 chimeras was associated with an increased aggregation propensity: (i) the minimum polyQ length leading to aggregation was lower, and (ii) the aggregation rate was significantly higher than that observed by 197 chimeras with equivalent polyQ lengths. Remarkably, the two sites of polyQ insertion are indeed very similar, both residing within flexible loop regions between stable α-helices. Moreover, the 216 chimeras exhibited a higher aggregation propensity than their 197 counterparts even under denaturing conditions, suggesting the disparity between the two chimeras cannot be accounted for by structural differences alone. These findings highlight the strong and complex influence of the overall protein context on polyQ-mediated aggregation. The molecular basis for the observed changes in stability and aggregation propensity is the subject of on-going work. [less ▲]

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See detailA Nanobody Binding to Non-amyloidogenic Regions of the Protein Human Lysozyme Enhances Partial Unfolding but Inhibits Amyloid Fibril Formation.
de Genst, EJ; Chan, PH; Pardon, Els et al

in Journal of Physical Chemistry B (2013)

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See detailNanobodies as structural probes to investigate the mechanism of fibril formation by the amyloidogenic variants of human lysozyme
Dumont, Janice ULg; pardon, Els; Aumont-Nicaise, Magali et al

Poster (2012, June)

Six variants of human lysozyme (single-point mutatants I56T, F57I, W64R, D67H and double mutants F57I/T70N, W112R/T70N) are associated with a hereditary non-neuropathic systemic amyloidosis. These ... [more ▼]

Six variants of human lysozyme (single-point mutatants I56T, F57I, W64R, D67H and double mutants F57I/T70N, W112R/T70N) are associated with a hereditary non-neuropathic systemic amyloidosis. These proteins form extracellular amyloid fibrils that deposit in a wide range of tissues and organs such as liver, spleen and kidneys where they cause damages [1]. It was shown that the D67H and I56T mutations cause a loss in stability and more particularly a loss of global cooperativity of protein [1]. Consequently, under physiologically relevant conditions, these variants can transiently populate a partially unfolded state in which the beta-domain and the C-helix are cooperatively unfolded while the rest of the protein remains native like [1]. The formation of intermolecular interactions between the regions that are unfolded in this intermediate state is likely to be a fundamental trigger of the aggregation process that ultimately leads to the formation and deposition of fibrils in tissues. We have also shown that the binding of three variable domain of camelid antibodies (VHHs) - raised against the wild type human lysozyme inhibit in vitro the formation of amyloid fibrils by the lysozyme variants. These three VHHs bind on different regions of lysozyme and act as amyloid fibril inhibitor through different mechanisms [2, 3, and unpublished results]. In the present work, sixteen new VHHs specific of human lysozyme have been generated. Competition experiments have shown that they bind to five non-overlapping epitopes. We have demonstrated that five of these VHHs are able to bind lysozyme in conditions used for amyloid fibril formation, and interestingly two of them recognize two epitopes that are different from those of the three VHHs previously characterized [2, 3, and unpublished results]. The effects of these new VHHs on the properties of lysozyme variants such as stability, cooperativity and aggregation will be discussed. [1] Dumoulin, M., J.R. Kumita, and C.M. Dobson, Normal and aberrant biological self-assembly: Insights from studies of human lysozyme and its amyloidogenic variants. Acc Chem Res, 2006, 39(9), 603-610. [2] Dumoulin, M., et al., A camelid antibody fragment inhibits the formation of amyloid fibrils by human lysozyme. Nature, 2003, 424, 783-788. [3] Chan, P.H., et al., Engineering a camelid antibody fragment that binds to the active site of human lysozyme and inhibits its conversion into amyloid fibrils. Biochemistry, 2008, 47, 11041-11054. [less ▲]

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See detailDisease-related amyloidogenic variants of human lysozyme trigger the unfolded protein response and disturb eye development in Drosophila melanogaster
Kumita, Janet R.; Helmfors, Linda; Williams, Jocy et al

in FASEB Journal (2012)

We have created a Drosophila model of lysozyme amyloidosis to investigate the in vivo behavior of disease-associated variants. To achieve this objective, wild-type (WT) protein and the amyloidogenic ... [more ▼]

We have created a Drosophila model of lysozyme amyloidosis to investigate the in vivo behavior of disease-associated variants. To achieve this objective, wild-type (WT) protein and the amyloidogenic variants F57I and D67H were expressed in Drosophila melanogaster using the UAS-gal4 system and both the ubiquitous and retinal expression drivers Act5C-gal4 and gmr-gal4. The nontransgenic w(1118) Drosophila line was used as a control throughout. We utilized ELISA experiments to probe lysozyme protein levels, scanning electron microscopy for eye phenotype classification, and immunohistochemistry to detect the unfolded protein response (UPR) activation. We observed that expressing the destabilized F57I and D67H lysozymes triggers UPR activation, resulting in degradation of these variants, whereas the WT lysozyme is secreted into the fly hemolymph. Indeed, the level of WT was up to 17 times more abundant than the variant proteins. In addition, the F57I variant gave rise to a significant disruption of the eye development, and this correlated to pronounced UPR activation. These results support the concept that the onset of familial amyloid disease is linked to an inability of the UPR to degrade completely the amyloidogenic lysozymes prior to secretion, resulting in secretion of these destabilized variants, thereby leading to deposition and associated organ damage.-Kumita, J. R., Helmfors, L., Williams, J., Luheshi, L. M., Menzer, L., Dumoulin, M., Lomas, D. A., Crowther, D. C., Dobson, C. M., Brorsson, A.-C. Disease-related amyloidogenic variants of human lysozyme trigger the unfolded protein response and disturb eye development in Drosophila melanogaster. [less ▲]

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See detailNanobodies as structural probes to investigate the mechanism of fibril formation by the amyloidogenic variants of human lysozyme
Dumont, Janice ULg; Pardon, Els; Aumont-Nicaise, Magalie et al

Poster (2011)

Six variants of human lysozyme (single-point mutations I56T, F57I, W64R, D67H and double mutations F57I/T70N, W112R/T70N) are associated with a hereditary non-neuropathic systemic amyloidose. These ... [more ▼]

Six variants of human lysozyme (single-point mutations I56T, F57I, W64R, D67H and double mutations F57I/T70N, W112R/T70N) are associated with a hereditary non-neuropathic systemic amyloidose. These proteins form extracellular amyloid fibrils that deposit in a wide range of tissues and organs such as liver, spleen and kidneys where they cause damages [1]. It was shown that the D67H and I56T mutations cause a loss in stability and more particularly a loss of global cooperativity of protein [1]. Consequently, under physiologically relevant conditions, these variants can transiently populate a partially unfolded state in which the beta-domain and the C-helix are cooperatively unfolded while the rest of the protein remains native like [1]. The formation of intermolecular interactions between the regions that are unfolded in this intermediate state is likely to be a fundamental trigger of the aggregation process that ultimately leads to the formation and deposition of fibrils in tissues. We have also shown that the binding of three variable domain of camelid antibodies or (VHHs) - raised against the wild type human lysozyme inhibit in vitro the formation of amyloid fibrils by the lysozyme variants. These three VHHs bind on different regions of lysozyme and act as amyloid fibrils inhibitor through different mechanisms [2, 3, and unpublished results]. In the present work, sixteen new VHHs specific of human lysozyme have been generated. Competition experiments have shown that they bind to five non overlapping epitopes. We have demonstrated that five of these new VHHs are able to bind lysozyme in conditions used for amyloid fibril formation, and interestingly two of them recognize two epitopes that are different from those of the three VHHs previously characterized [2, 3, and unpublished results]. The effects of these new VHHs on the properties of lysozyme variants such as activity, stability, cooperativity and aggregation will be discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailCamelid single-domain antibody fragments as structural probes to study the mechanism of human lysozyme fibrils formation
Dumont, Janice ULg; Pardon, Els; Menzer, Linda ULg et al

Poster (2010)

Six variants of human lysozyme (single-point mutations I56T, F57I, W64R, D67H and double mutations F57I/T70N, W112R/T70N) are associated with a hereditary non-neuropathic systemic amyloidosis. These ... [more ▼]

Six variants of human lysozyme (single-point mutations I56T, F57I, W64R, D67H and double mutations F57I/T70N, W112R/T70N) are associated with a hereditary non-neuropathic systemic amyloidosis. These proteins form extracellular amyloid fibrils that deposit in a wide range of tissues and organs such as liver, spleen and kidneys where they cause damages [1]. It was shown that the D67H and I56T mutations cause a loss in stability and more particularly a loss of global cooperativity of protein [1]. Consequently, under physiologically relevant conditions, these variants can transiently populate a partially unfolded state in which the beta-domain and the C-helix are cooperatively unfolded while the rest of the protein remains native like [1]. The formation of intermolecular interactions between the regions that are unfolded in this intermediate state is likely to be a fundamental trigger of the aggregation process that ultimately leads to the formation and deposition of fibrils in tissues. The binding of three variable domain of camelid antibodies – also named nanobodies - (cAb-HuL 6 [2], cAb-HuL 5 and cAb-HuL 22 [3]) raised against the wild type human lysozyme inhibit in vitro the formation of amyloid fibrils by the lysozyme variants. These three nanobodies bind on different regions of lysozyme and act as amyloid fibrils inhibitor through different mechanisms. On one hand, cAb-HuL 6 and cAb-HuL 22 stabilize the native state of the lysozyme variants thus restoring the global cooperativity characteristic of the wild-type protein. On the other, cAb-HuL 5 probably acts by binding soluble prefibrillar aggregates. In the present work, sixteen other nanobodies specific of human lysozyme have been generated. Competition experiments have shown that they bind to five non overlapping epitopes. The effects of the binding of these nanobodies on the stability of the D67H variant of human lysozyme and on its aggregation into amyloid fibrils will be discussed. References [1] Dumoulin et al, (2006) Acc. Chem. Res, 39, 603-610. [2] Dumoulin et al, (2003) Nature, 424, 783-788. [3] Chan et al. (2008) Biochemistry, 47,11041-11054. [less ▲]

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See detailNanobodies as structural probes to investigate the mechanism of fibril formation by the amyloidogenic variants of human lysozyme.
Dumont, Janice ULg; Menzer, Linda ULg; Pardon, Els et al

Poster (2010)

Six variants of human lysozyme (single-point mutations I56T, F57I, W64R, D67H and double mutations F57I/T70N, W112R/T70N) are associated with a hereditary non-neuropathic systemic amyloidose. These ... [more ▼]

Six variants of human lysozyme (single-point mutations I56T, F57I, W64R, D67H and double mutations F57I/T70N, W112R/T70N) are associated with a hereditary non-neuropathic systemic amyloidose. These proteins form extracellular amyloid fibrils that deposit in a wide range of tissues and organs such as liver, spleen and kidneys where they cause damages [1]. It was shown that the D67H and I56T mutations cause a loss in stability and more particularly a loss of global cooperativity of protein [1]. Consequently, under physiologically relevant conditions, these variants can transiently populate a partially unfolded state in which the beta-domain and the C-helix are cooperatively unfolded while the rest of the protein remains native like [1]. The formation of intermolecular interactions between the regions that are unfolded in this intermediate state is likely to be a fundamental trigger of the aggregation process that ultimately leads to the formation and deposition of fibrils in tissues. The binding of three variable domain of camelid antibodies – also named nanobodies - (cAb-HuL 6 [2], cAb-HuL 5 and cAb-HuL 22 [3]) raised against the wild type human lysozyme inhibit in vitro the formation of amyloid fibrils by the lysozyme variants. These three nanobodies bind on different regions of lysozyme and act as Amyloid fibrils inhibitor through different mechanisms. On one hand, cAb-HuL 6 and cAb-HuL 22 stabilize the native state of the lysozyme variants thus restoring the global cooperativity characteristic of the wild-type protein. On the other, cAb-HuL 5 probably acts by binding soluble prefibrillar aggregates. In the present work, sixteen other nanobodies specific of human lysozyme have been generated. Competition experiments have shown that they bind to five non overlapping epitopes. The effects of the binding of these nanobodies on the stability of the D67H variant of human lysozyme and on its aggregation into amyloid fibrils will be discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization of Oligomeric Species on the Aggregation Pathway of Human Lysozyme
Frare, Erica; Mossuto, Maria F.; Polverino de Laureto, Patrizia et al

in Journal of Molecular Biology (2009)

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See detailProduction of four amyloidogenic variants of human lysozyme as inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli
Dumont, Janice ULg; Menzer, Linda ULg; Scarafone, Natacha ULg et al

Poster (2009)

Six variants of human lysozyme (I56T, F57I, W64R, D67H, F57I/T70N and W112R/T70N) are associated with a hereditary non-neuropathic systemic amyloidosis. This disease involved an extra cellular deposition ... [more ▼]

Six variants of human lysozyme (I56T, F57I, W64R, D67H, F57I/T70N and W112R/T70N) are associated with a hereditary non-neuropathic systemic amyloidosis. This disease involved an extra cellular deposition of amyloid fibrils made of lysozyme variants in a wide range of organs such as liver, spleen and kidneys [1]. The characterisation at the molecular level of two variants, I56T and D67H, has shown that these mutations reduce the stability and more particularly the global cooperativity of the protein. Consequently, under physiologically relevant conditions, these variants can transiently populate a partially unfolded state in which the beta-domain and the C-helix are cooperatively unfolded while the rest of the protein remains native like [1]. The formation of intermolecular interactions between the regions that are unfolded in this intermediate state is likely to be a fundamental trigger of the aggregation process that ultimately leads to the formation and deposition of fibrils in tissues. In order to study the effects of the other amyloidogenic mutations on the properties of lysozyme and thus to get more insight in the mechanism of amyloid formation, it is necessary to produce them in large quantities. The D67H, I56T and F57I variants are currently produced in Aspergillus niger; the expression in this organism is, however, time consuming and the yield is very low. The attempts to use alternative systems such as Pichia pastoris [2], Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Arabidopsis thaliana have not been conclusive so far. In this work, we have produced the four single-point lysozyme variants as inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli and explored the possibility to refold them. [1] Dumoulin & al., (2006) Acc. Chem. Res., 39, 603 - 610 [2] Kumita & al., (2006) FEBS J., 273, 711-720 [less ▲]

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See detailOptimization of the Production of the Amyloidogenic Variants of Human Lysozyme
Menzer, Linda ULg; Tocquin, Pierre ULg; Dony, Nicolas et al

Poster (2008, February 16)

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See detailEngineering a camelid antibody fragment that binds to the active site of human lysozyme and inhibits its conversion into amyloid fibrils
Chan, Pak Ho; Pardon, Els; Menzer, Linda ULg et al

in Biochemistry (2008), 47

single-domain fragment, cAb-HuL22, of a camelid heavy-chain antibody specific for the active site of human lysozyme has been generated, and its effects on the properties of the I56T and D67H amyloidogenic ... [more ▼]

single-domain fragment, cAb-HuL22, of a camelid heavy-chain antibody specific for the active site of human lysozyme has been generated, and its effects on the properties of the I56T and D67H amyloidogenic variants of human lysozyme, which are associated with a form of systemic amyloidosis, have been investigated by a wide range of biophysical techniques. Pulse-labeling hydrogen-deuterium exchange experiments monitored by mass spectrometry reveal that binding of the antibody fragment strongly inhibits the locally cooperative unfolding of the I56T and D67H variants and restores their global cooperativity to that characteristic of the wild-type protein. The antibody fragment was, however, not stable enough under the conditions used to explore its ability to perturb the aggregation behavior of the lysozyme amyloidogenic variants. We therefore engineered a more stable version of cAb-HuL22 by adding a disulfide bridge between the two beta-sheets in the hydrophobic core of the protein. The binding of this engineered antibody fragment to the amyloidogenic variants of lysozyme inhibited their aggregation into fibrils. These findings support the premise that the reduction in global cooperativity caused by the pathogenic mutations in the lysozyme gene is the determining feature underlying their amyloidogenicity. These observations indicate further that molecular targeting of enzyme active sites, and of protein binding sites in general, is an effective strategy for inhibiting or preventing the aberrant self-assembly process that is often a consequence of protein mutation and the origin of pathogenicity. Moreover, this work further demonstrates the unique properties of camelid single-domain antibody fragments as structural probes for studying the mechanism of aggregation and as potential inhibitors of fibril formation. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Argonaute protein TbAGO1 contributes to large and mini-chromosome segregation and is required for control of RIME retroposons and RHS pseudogene-associated transcripts.
Durand-Dubief, Mickael; Absalon, Sabrina; Menzer, Linda ULg et al

in Molecular & Biochemical Parasitology (2007)

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