References of "Menten, Bjorn"
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See detailImplementation of genomic arrays in prenatal diagnosis: the Belgian approach to meet the challenges.
Vanakker, Olivier; Vilain, Catheline; Janssens, Katrien et al

in European journal of medical genetics (2014), 57(4), 151-6

After their successful introduction in postnatal testing, genome-wide arrays are now rapidly replacing conventional karyotyping in prenatal diagnostics. While previous studies have demonstrated the ... [more ▼]

After their successful introduction in postnatal testing, genome-wide arrays are now rapidly replacing conventional karyotyping in prenatal diagnostics. While previous studies have demonstrated the advantages of this method, we are confronted with difficulties regarding the technology and the ethical dilemmas inherent to genomic arrays. These include indication for testing, array design, interpretation of variants and how to deal with variants of unknown significance and incidental findings. The experiences with these issues reported in the literature are most often from single centres. Here, we report on a national consensus approach how microarray is implemented in all genetic centres in Belgium. These recommendations are subjected to constant re-evaluation based on our growing experience and can serve as a useful tool for those involved in prenatal diagnosis. [less ▲]

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See detailExonic deletions in AUTS2 cause a syndromic form of intellectual disability and suggest a critical role for the C terminus.
Beunders, Gea; Voorhoeve, Els; Golzio, Christelle et al

in American journal of human genetics (2013), 92(2), 210-20

Genomic rearrangements involving AUTS2 (7q11.22) are associated with autism and intellectual disability (ID), although evidence for causality is limited. By combining the results of diagnostic testing of ... [more ▼]

Genomic rearrangements involving AUTS2 (7q11.22) are associated with autism and intellectual disability (ID), although evidence for causality is limited. By combining the results of diagnostic testing of 49,684 individuals, we identified 24 microdeletions that affect at least one exon of AUTS2, as well as one translocation and one inversion each with a breakpoint within the AUTS2 locus. Comparison of 17 well-characterized individuals enabled identification of a variable syndromic phenotype including ID, autism, short stature, microcephaly, cerebral palsy, and facial dysmorphisms. The dysmorphic features were more pronounced in persons with 3'AUTS2 deletions. This part of the gene is shown to encode a C-terminal isoform (with an alternative transcription start site) expressed in the human brain. Consistent with our genetic data, suppression of auts2 in zebrafish embryos caused microcephaly that could be rescued by either the full-length or the C-terminal isoform of AUTS2. Our observations demonstrate a causal role of AUTS2 in neurocognitive disorders, establish a hitherto unappreciated syndromic phenotype at this locus, and show how transcriptional complexity can underpin human pathology. The zebrafish model provides a valuable tool for investigating the etiology of AUTS2 syndrome and facilitating gene-function analysis in the future. [less ▲]

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See detailTemple-Baraitser syndrome: a rare and possibly unrecognized condition.
Jacquinet, Adeline ULg; Gerard, Marion; Gabbett, Michael T et al

in American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part A (2010), 152A(9), 2322-6

Temple-Baraitser syndrome, previously described in two unrelated patients, is the association of severe mental retardation and abnormal thumbs and great toes. We report two additional unrelated patients ... [more ▼]

Temple-Baraitser syndrome, previously described in two unrelated patients, is the association of severe mental retardation and abnormal thumbs and great toes. We report two additional unrelated patients with Temple-Baraitser syndrome, review clinical and radiological features of previously reported cases and discuss mode of inheritance. Patients share a consistent pattern of anomalies: hypo or aplasia of the thumb and great toe nails and broadening and/or elongation of the thumbs and halluces, which have a tubular aspect. All patients were born to unrelated parents and occurred as a single occurrence in multiple sibships, suggesting sporadic inheritance from a de novo mutation mechanism. Comparative genomic hybridization in Patients 1, 2 and 3 did not reveal any copy number variations. We confirm that Temple-Baraitser syndrome represents a distinct syndrome, probably unrecognized, possibly caused by a de novo mutation in a not yet identified gene. [less ▲]

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