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See detailProfil des vendeurs de viande de chasse et évaluation de la biomasse commercialisée dans les marchés municipaux de Brazzaville, Congo.
Mbete, Roger Albert; Banga-Mboko, Henri; Ngokaka, Christophe et al

in Tropical Conservation Science (2011), 4(2), 203-217

The consumption of wildlife meat is an important source of animal protein for rural and urban population in Congo. A survey on bushmeat trade was undertaken in 21 municipal markets during four weeks, in ... [more ▼]

The consumption of wildlife meat is an important source of animal protein for rural and urban population in Congo. A survey on bushmeat trade was undertaken in 21 municipal markets during four weeks, in Brazzaville. The objective of this study was to define the traders’ profile and to evaluate the quantities of games and meat merchandised on the municipal markets. The study methodology combined two approaches: a quantitative one using a questionnaire as principal tool for collecting data, and a qualitative one associating informal survey methods via individual or group interviews. The results showed that women were the most involved in this trade (52%). Markets trader’s monthly income was estimated at 210,428 (US$420) ± 49,128 (US$98,256) FCFA. On average, the bushmeat traders’ were 39 ± 10 years old and 69% of them attended the two levels of secondary education. During four weeks, 3,711 animal carcasses were recorded on the 21 surveyed markets, representing almost 35,790 kg of biomass. Overall, 35 animal species were identified, including 9 the hunting of which was prohibited. The mammals constituted 93.8% of total number of hunted animals, with three dominant orders as the artiodactyls (49.2%), the rodents (22.6%) and the primates (17.7%), of which the Cephalophus, the Potamochoerus, the Atherurus and the Cercopithecus were the most represented. It was also noticed that trapping, an activity which leads to great losses, becomes very important, followed by be helpful alternatives to meet Congolese demand for bushmeat. For a sustainable management of the Congo’s faunic resources, this study suggests the introduction gun-hunting. The Congo-Ocean Railway and the National Road n°2 were used regularly in the transportation of game, to a 72% level. The district of Niari, Lekoumou, Sangha and Pool were the main sources of supply. At the present time, the meat quantities offered in Brazzaville markets don’t seem to be reduced because hunting areas extend always further, often to the detriment of protected areas. Despite the fact that such business squarely growths and shows evidence of overexploitation, activities promoting game farming and breeding of domestic species, in Brazzaville suburbs, are needed to mitigate the impact of bushmeat trade. [less ▲]

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See detailHousehold bushmeat consumption in Brazzaville, the Republic of the Congo.
Mbete, Roger Albert; Banga-Mboko, Henri; Racey, Paul et al

in Tropical Conservation Science (2011), 4(2), 187-202

Wildlife meat is an important source of animal protein for rural and urban populations in Congo. Quantitative and qualitative surveys on the consumption of bushmeat were undertaken in Brazzaville in 2006 ... [more ▼]

Wildlife meat is an important source of animal protein for rural and urban populations in Congo. Quantitative and qualitative surveys on the consumption of bushmeat were undertaken in Brazzaville in 2006, in about 1,050 urban households. The main objective was to establish the profiles of consumers and of species concerned. The results showed that 88.3% of the surveyed households consumed bushmeat. Their average size was 5.7 ± 3.2 persons. The average monthly income of an urban consumer with a permanent job was 98,334 (US$197) ± 84,306 (US$169) FCFA. It appeared that households preferred to consume bushmeat for two major reasons: the taste or flavor (67.8%) and food habits (14.7%). Meat from mammals was preferred, the top three orders of this class being artiodactyls (48.3%), rodents (28.3%), and primates (13.0%). Some of them are listed as threatened in Congo Brazzaville and are included in the IUCN Red List. The results showed that in Brazzaville, bushmeat consumption remains important and is determined by socio-economic parameters. The promotion of game farming, and breeding of domestic species such as poultry and fish, in the Brazzaville suburbs could help to meet Congolese demand for bushmeat. [less ▲]

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