References of "Maury, A"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA ring system detected around the Centaur (10199) Chariklo
Braga-Ribas; Sicardy; Ortiz et al

in Nature (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (4 ULg)
Full Text
See detailThe May 4, 2013 Stellar Occultation by Pluto and Implications for Pluto's Atmosphere
Olkin, Catherine B.; Young, L. A.; Borncamp, D. et al

in Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society (2013, October 01), 45

On May 4 2013, Pluto passed in front of a 14 star and the shadow was well observed from multiple occultation groups. This paper presents results from the three light curves observed at Las Cumbres ... [more ▼]

On May 4 2013, Pluto passed in front of a 14 star and the shadow was well observed from multiple occultation groups. This paper presents results from the three light curves observed at Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network (LCOGT) from their Cerro Tololo site. The three LCOGT telescopes have 1.0 m apertures and used identical frame-transfer cameras. The cameras currently have a 2 second readout time therefore autonomous observations were scheduled with different exposure times to give good time resolution of the event. We will present results of this occultation and compare occultation results from 1988 to 2013 with volatile transport models. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe Size, Shape, Albedo, Density, and Atmospheric Limit of Transneptunian Object (50000) Quaoar from Multi-chord Stellar Occultations
Braga-Ribas, F.; Sicardy, B.; Ortiz, J. L. et al

in Astrophysical Journal (2013), 773

We present results derived from the first multi-chord stellar occultations by the transneptunian object (50000) Quaoar, observed on 2011 May 4 and 2012 February 17, and from a single-chord occultation ... [more ▼]

We present results derived from the first multi-chord stellar occultations by the transneptunian object (50000) Quaoar, observed on 2011 May 4 and 2012 February 17, and from a single-chord occultation observed on 2012 October 15. If the timing of the five chords obtained in 2011 were correct, then Quaoar would possess topographic features (crater or mountain) that would be too large for a body of this mass. An alternative model consists in applying time shifts to some chords to account for possible timing errors. Satisfactory elliptical fits to the chords are then possible, yielding an equivalent radius R [SUB]equiv[/SUB] = 555 ± 2.5 km and geometric visual albedo p[SUB]V[/SUB] = 0.109 ± 0.007. Assuming that Quaoar is a Maclaurin spheroid with an indeterminate polar aspect angle, we derive a true oblateness of \epsilon = 0.087^{+0.0268}_{-0.0175}, an equatorial radius of 569^{+24}_{-17} km, and a density of 1.99 ± 0.46 g cm[SUP]–3[/SUP]. The orientation of our preferred solution in the plane of the sky implies that Quaoar's satellite Weywot cannot have an equatorial orbit. Finally, we detect no global atmosphere around Quaoar, considering a pressure upper limit of about 20 nbar for a pure methane atmosphere. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAlbedo and atmospheric constraints of dwarf planet Makemake from a stellar occultation
Ortiz, J. L.; Sicardy, B.; Braga-Ribas, F. et al

in Nature (2012), 491

Pluto and Eris are icy dwarf planets with nearly identical sizes, comparable densities and similar surface compositions as revealed by spectroscopic studies. Pluto possesses an atmosphere whereas Eris ... [more ▼]

Pluto and Eris are icy dwarf planets with nearly identical sizes, comparable densities and similar surface compositions as revealed by spectroscopic studies. Pluto possesses an atmosphere whereas Eris does not; the difference probably arises from their differing distances from the Sun, and explains their different albedos. Makemake is another icy dwarf planet with a spectrum similar to Eris and Pluto, and is currently at a distance to the Sun intermediate between the two. Although Makemake's size (1,420+/-60km) and albedo are roughly known, there has been no constraint on its density and there were expectations that it could have a Pluto-like atmosphere. Here we report the results from a stellar occultation by Makemake on 2011 April 23. Our preferred solution that fits the occultation chords corresponds to a body with projected axes of 1,430+/-9km (1σ) and 1,502+/-45km, implying a V-band geometric albedo p[SUB]V[/SUB] = 0.77+/-0.03. This albedo is larger than that of Pluto, but smaller than that of Eris. The disappearances and reappearances of the star were abrupt, showing that Makemake has no global Pluto-like atmosphere at an upper limit of 4-12nanobar (1σ) for the surface pressure, although a localized atmosphere is possible. A density of 1.7+/-0.3gcm[SUP]-3[/SUP] is inferred from the data. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (2 ULg)
Full Text
See detailCharon's Size And Orbit From Double Stellar Occultations
Sicardy, Bruno; Braga-Ribas, F.; Widemann, T. et al

in AAS/Division for Planetary Sciences Meeting Abstracts (2012, October 01)

Stellar occultations of a same star by both Pluto and Charon (double events) yield instantaneous relative positions of the two bodies projected in the plane of the sky, at 10km-level accuracy. Assuming a ... [more ▼]

Stellar occultations of a same star by both Pluto and Charon (double events) yield instantaneous relative positions of the two bodies projected in the plane of the sky, at 10km-level accuracy. Assuming a given pole orientation for Charon's orbit, double events provide the satellite plutocentric distance r at a given orbital longitude L (counted from the ascending node on J2000 mean equator), and finally, constraints on its orbit. A double event observed on 22 June 2008 provides r=19,564+/-14 km at L=153.483+/-0.071 deg. (Sicardy et al. 2011), while another double event observed on 4 June 2011 yields: r=19,586+/-15 km at L = 343.211+/-0.072 deg. (all error bars at 1-sigma level). These two positions are consistent with a circular orbit for Charon, with a semi-major axis of a=19,575+\-10 km. This can be compared to the circular orbit found by Buie et al. (2012), based on Hubble Space Telescope data, with a=19,573+/-2 km. The 4 June 2011 stellar occultation provides 3 chords across Charon, from which a radius of Rc= 602.4+/-1.6 km is derived. This value can be compared to that obtained from the 11 July 2005 occultation: Rc= 606.0+/-1.5 km (Person et al. 2006) and Rc= 603.6+/-1.4 km (Sicardy et al. 2006). A third double event, observed on 23 June 2011 is under ongoing analysis, and will be presented. Buie et al. (2012), AJ 144, 15-34 (2012) Person et al, AJ 132, 1575-1580 (2006) Sicardy et al., Nature 439, 52-54 (2006) Sicardy et al., AJ 141, 67-83 (2011) B.S. thanks ANR "Beyond Neptune II". L.A.Y. acknowledges support by NASA, New Horizons and National Geographic grants. We thank B. Barnard, M.J. Brucker, J. Daily, C. Erikson, W. Fukunaga, C. Harlinten, C. Livermore, C. Nance, J.R. Regester, L. Salas, P. Tamblyn, R. Westhoff for help in the observations. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 26 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCharacterizing Lenses and Lensed Stars of High-magnification Single-lens Gravitational Microlensing Events with Lenses Passing over Source Stars
Choi, J.-Y.; Shin, I.-G.; Park, S.-Y. et al

in Astrophysical Journal (2012), 751

We present the analysis of the light curves of nine high-magnification single-lens gravitational microlensing events with lenses passing over source stars, including OGLE-2004-BLG-254, MOA-2007-BLG-176 ... [more ▼]

We present the analysis of the light curves of nine high-magnification single-lens gravitational microlensing events with lenses passing over source stars, including OGLE-2004-BLG-254, MOA-2007-BLG-176, MOA-2007-BLG-233/OGLE-2007-BLG-302, MOA-2009-BLG-174, MOA-2010-BLG-436, MOA-2011-BLG-093, MOA-2011-BLG-274, OGLE-2011-BLG-0990/MOA-2011-BLG-300, and OGLE-2011-BLG-1101/MOA-2011-BLG-325. For all of the events, we measure the linear limb-darkening coefficients of the surface brightness profile of source stars by measuring the deviation of the light curves near the peak affected by the finite-source effect. For seven events, we measure the Einstein radii and the lens-source relative proper motions. Among them, five events are found to have Einstein radii of less than 0.2 mas, making the lenses very low mass star or brown dwarf candidates. For MOA-2011-BLG-274, especially, the small Einstein radius of θ[SUB]E[/SUB] ~ 0.08 mas combined with the short timescale of t [SUB]E[/SUB] ~ 2.7 days suggests the possibility that the lens is a free-floating planet. For MOA-2009-BLG-174, we measure the lens parallax and thus uniquely determine the physical parameters of the lens. We also find that the measured lens mass of ~0.84 M [SUB]&sun;[/SUB] is consistent with that of a star blended with the source, suggesting that the blend is likely to be the lens. Although we did not find planetary signals for any of the events, we provide exclusion diagrams showing the confidence levels excluding the existence of a planet as a function of the separation and mass ratio. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMicrolensing Binaries Discovered through High-magnification Channel
Shin, I.-G.; Choi, J.-Y.; Park, S.-Y. et al

in Astrophysical Journal (2012), 746

Microlensing can provide a useful tool to probe binary distributions down to low-mass limits of binary companions. In this paper, we analyze the light curves of eight binary-lensing events detected ... [more ▼]

Microlensing can provide a useful tool to probe binary distributions down to low-mass limits of binary companions. In this paper, we analyze the light curves of eight binary-lensing events detected through the channel of high-magnification events during the seasons from 2007 to 2010. The perturbations, which are confined near the peak of the light curves, can be easily distinguished from the central perturbations caused by planets. However, the degeneracy between close and wide binary solutions cannot be resolved with a 3σ confidence level for three events, implying that the degeneracy would be an important obstacle in studying binary distributions. The dependence of the degeneracy on the lensing parameters is consistent with a theoretical prediction that the degeneracy becomes severe as the binary separation and the mass ratio deviate from the values of resonant caustics. The measured mass ratio of the event OGLE-2008-BLG-510/MOA-2008-BLG-369 is q ~ 0.1, making the companion of the lens a strong brown dwarf candidate. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA Pluto-like radius and a high albedo for the dwarf planet Eris from an occultation
Sicardy, B.; Ortiz, J. L.; Assafin, M. et al

in Nature (2011), 478

The dwarf planet Eris is a trans-Neptunian object with an orbital eccentricity of 0.44, an inclination of 44 degrees and a surface composition very similar to that of Pluto. It resides at present at 95.7 ... [more ▼]

The dwarf planet Eris is a trans-Neptunian object with an orbital eccentricity of 0.44, an inclination of 44 degrees and a surface composition very similar to that of Pluto. It resides at present at 95.7 astronomical units (1AU is the Earth-Sun distance) from Earth, near its aphelion and more than three times farther than Pluto. Owing to this great distance, measuring its size or detecting a putative atmosphere is difficult. Here we report the observation of a multi-chord stellar occultation by Eris on 6 November 2010 UT. The event is consistent with a spherical shape for Eris, with radius 1,163+/-6kilometres, density 2.52+/-0.05 grams per cm[SUP]3[/SUP] and a high visible geometric albedo, . No nitrogen, argon or methane atmospheres are detected with surface pressure larger than ~1nanobar, about 10,000 times more tenuous than Pluto's present atmosphere. As Pluto's radius is estimated to be between 1,150 and 1,200 kilometres, Eris appears as a Pluto twin, with a bright surface possibly caused by a collapsed atmosphere, owing to its cold environment. We anticipate that this atmosphere may periodically sublimate as Eris approaches its perihelion, at 37.8 astronomical units from the Sun. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (6 ULg)
Full Text
See detailStellar Occultations by TNOs: the January 08, 2011 by (208996) 2003 AZ84 and the May 04, 2011 by (50000) Quaoar
Braga-Ribas, F.; Sicardy, B.; Ortiz, J. L. et al

in EPSC-DPS Joint Meeting 2011, held 2-7 October 2011 in Nantes, France. <A href="http://meetings.copernicus.org/epsc-dps2011">http://meetings.copernicus.org/epsc-dps2011</A>, p.1060 (2011, October 01)

Between February 2010 and May 2011, our group has observed five stellar occultations by Trans-Neptunian Objects (TNOs), giving the size and shape for some of the biggest TNO's: Varuna, Eris, 2003 AZ84 ... [more ▼]

Between February 2010 and May 2011, our group has observed five stellar occultations by Trans-Neptunian Objects (TNOs), giving the size and shape for some of the biggest TNO's: Varuna, Eris, 2003 AZ84, Makemake and Quaoar. Here we present two of them: the January 08 stellar occultation by 2003 AZ84, and the May 04 by Quaoar. For the event of 2003 AZ84 we obtained one positive and another negative occultation chords in Chile. We give a lower limit to the diameter of the TNO. The event of Quaoar was observed from 16 sites distributed in Uruguay, Argentina, Chile and Brazil. Five of them yielded positive detection of the occultation. A preliminary analysis shows that the body is probably elongated and significantly bigger than the size determined by Fraser & Brown 2010, with a diameter of 890km. Using the size determined by the occultation, we will discuss the implications for the body density and albedo determination. The upper limit of the atmosphere is also studied. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 47 (0 ULg)
Full Text
See detailThe stellar occultation by Makemake on 2011 April 23
Ortiz, J. L.; Sicardy, B.; Assafin, M. et al

in EPSC-DPS Joint Meeting 2011, held 2-7 October 2011 in Nantes, France. <A href="http://meetings.copernicus.org/epsc-dps2011">http://meetings.copernicus.org/epsc-dps2011</A>, p.704 (2011, October 01)

We have taken advantage of a stellar occultation by the dwarf planet Makemake on 2011 April 23, to determine several of its main physical properties. We present results from a multisite campaign with 8 ... [more ▼]

We have taken advantage of a stellar occultation by the dwarf planet Makemake on 2011 April 23, to determine several of its main physical properties. We present results from a multisite campaign with 8 positive occultation detections from 5 different sites, including data from the 8-m VLT and 3.5-m NTT telescopes in Chile, which have very high temporal resolution. Because the star was significantly fainter than Makemake (setting a record in the magnitude of a star whose occultation has been detected), the occultation resulted in a drop of just ~0.3 mag in the lightcurves. From the lightcurves we have been able to determine the size and shape of the body, its geometric albedo and constraints on its atmosphere. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (0 ULg)
Full Text
See detailSize, density, albedo and atmosphere limit of dwarf planet Eris from a stellar occultation
Sicardy, B.; Ortiz, J. L.; Assafin, M. et al

in EPSC-DPS Joint Meeting 2011, held 2-7 October 2011 in Nantes, France. <A href="http://meetings.copernicus.org/epsc-dps2011">http://meetings.copernicus.org/epsc-dps2011</A>, p.137 (2011, October 01)

We report the observation of a multi-chord stellar occultation by the dwarf planet (136199) Eris. The event was observed on November 6, 2010 UT, from two sites in Chile. Our observation is consistent with ... [more ▼]

We report the observation of a multi-chord stellar occultation by the dwarf planet (136199) Eris. The event was observed on November 6, 2010 UT, from two sites in Chile. Our observation is consistent with a spherical Eris with radius RE=1163±6 km, density =2.52±0.05 g cm-3, and visible geometric albedo pV=0.96+0.09 -0.04. Besides being remarkably similar in size to Pluto, Eris appears as one of the intrinsically brightest objects of the solar system, with a density suggesting a mainly rocky interior. Upper limits of about 1 nbar are derived for the surface pressure of possible nitrogen, argon or methane atmospheres of the dwarf planet. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 39 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMOA-2009-BLG-387Lb: a massive planet orbiting an M dwarf
Batista, V.; Gould, A.; Dieters, S. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2011), 529

<BR /> Aims: We report the discovery of a planet with a high planet-to-star mass ratio in the microlensing event MOA-2009-BLG-387, which exhibited pronounced deviations over a 12-day interval, one of the ... [more ▼]

<BR /> Aims: We report the discovery of a planet with a high planet-to-star mass ratio in the microlensing event MOA-2009-BLG-387, which exhibited pronounced deviations over a 12-day interval, one of the longest for any planetary event. The host is an M dwarf, with a mass in the range 0.07 M[SUB]&sun;[/SUB] < M[SUB]host[/SUB] < 0.49 M[SUB]&sun;[/SUB] at 90% confidence. The planet-star mass ratio q = 0.0132 ± 0.003 has been measured extremely well, so at the best-estimated host mass, the planet mass is m[SUB]p[/SUB] = 2.6 Jupiter masses for the median host mass, M = 0.19 M[SUB]&sun;[/SUB]. <BR /> Methods: The host mass is determined from two "higher order" microlensing parameters. One of these, the angular Einstein radius θ[SUB]E[/SUB] = 0.31 ± 0.03 mas has been accurately measured, but the other (the microlens parallax π[SUB]E[/SUB], which is due to the Earth's orbital motion) is highly degenerate with the orbital motion of the planet. We statistically resolve the degeneracy between Earth and planet orbital effects by imposing priors from a Galactic model that specifies the positions and velocities of lenses and sources and a Kepler model of orbits. <BR /> Results: The 90% confidence intervals for the distance, semi-major axis, and period of the planet are 3.5 kpc < D[SUB]L[/SUB] < 7.9 kpc, 1.1 AU < a < 2.7 AU, and 3.8 yr < P < 7.6 yr, respectively. Photometric data is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via <A href="http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/529/A102">http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/529/A102</A> [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (3 ULg)
Full Text
See detailStellar Occultation by Transneptunian Object (208996) 2003 AZ84
Braga-Ribas, F.; Sicardy, B.; Colas, F. et al

in Central Bureau Electronic Telegrams (2011), 2675

CBET 2675 available at Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams.

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA sub-Saturn Mass Planet, MOA-2009-BLG-319Lb
Miyake, N.; Sumi, T.; Dong, Subo et al

in Astrophysical Journal (2011), 1010

We report the gravitational microlensing discovery of a sub-Saturn mass planet, MOA-2009-BLG-319Lb, orbiting a K or M-dwarf star in the inner Galactic disk or Galactic bulge. The high cadence observations ... [more ▼]

We report the gravitational microlensing discovery of a sub-Saturn mass planet, MOA-2009-BLG-319Lb, orbiting a K or M-dwarf star in the inner Galactic disk or Galactic bulge. The high cadence observations of the MOA-II survey discovered this microlensing event and enabled its identification as a high magnification event approximately 24 hours prior to peak magnification. As a result, the planetary signal at the peak of this light curve was observed by 20 different telescopes, which is the largest number of telescopes to contribute to a planetary discovery to date. The microlensing model for this event indicates a planet-star mass ratio of q = (3.95 +/- 0.02) x 10^{-4} and a separation of d = 0.97537 +/- 0.00007 in units of the Einstein radius. A Bayesian analysis based on the measured Einstein radius crossing time, t_E, and angular Einstein radius, \theta_E, along with a standard Galactic model indicates a host star mass of M_L = 0.38^{+0.34}_{-0.18} M_{Sun} and a planet mass of M_p = 50^{+44}_{-24} M_{Earth}, which is half the mass of Saturn. This analysis also yields a planet-star three-dimensional separation of a = 2.4^{+1.2}_{-0.6} AU and a distance to the planetary system of D_L = 6.1^{+1.1}_{-1.2} kpc. This separation is ~ 2 times the distance of the snow line, a separation similar to most of the other planets discovered by microlensing. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (6 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFrequency of Solar-like Systems and of Ice and Gas Giants Beyond the Snow Line from High-magnification Microlensing Events in 2005-2008
Gould, A.; Dong, Subo; Gaudi, B. S. et al

in Astrophysical Journal (2010), 720

We present the first measurement of the planet frequency beyond the "snow line," for the planet-to-star mass-ratio interval –4.5 < log q < –2, corresponding to the range of ice giants to gas giants. We ... [more ▼]

We present the first measurement of the planet frequency beyond the "snow line," for the planet-to-star mass-ratio interval –4.5 < log q < –2, corresponding to the range of ice giants to gas giants. We find \endgraf\vbox{\begin{center}$\displaystyle{d^2 N{_{\rm pl}}\over d\log q\, d\log s} = (0.36\pm 0.15)\;{\rm dex}^{-2}$\end{center}}\noindentat the mean mass ratio q = 5 × 10 –4 with no discernible deviation from a flat (Öpik's law) distribution in log-projected separation s. The determination is based on a sample of six planets detected from intensive follow-up observations of high-magnification ( A>200) microlensing events during 2005-2008. The sampled host stars have a typical mass M host ~ 0.5 M sun [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 72 (8 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFrequency of Solar-Like Systems and Planet Mass-Ratio Distribution Function Beyond the Snow Line from High-Magnification Microlensing Events
Gould, A.; Dong, S.; Gaudi, B~S et al

in Astrophysical Journal (2010), 720

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (6 ULg)