References of "Mathy-Hartert, M"
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See detailLe Rôle des antioxydants dans la prise en charge des maladies articulaires.
Mathy-Hartert, M.; Burton, S.; Deby-Dupont, G. et al

in Dieta (2003), 33

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See detailOxygen consumption and electron spin resonance studies of free radical production by alveolar cells exposed to anoxia: inhibiting effects of the antibiotic ceftazidime.
Mouithys-mickalad, A.; Mathy-hartert, M.; Du, G. et al

in Redox Report : Communications in Free Radical Research (2002), 7(2), 85-94

By EPR spectroscopy, we investigated free radical production by cultured human alveolar cells subjected to anoxia/re-oxygenation (A/R), and tested the effects of ceftazidime, an antibiotic previously ... [more ▼]

By EPR spectroscopy, we investigated free radical production by cultured human alveolar cells subjected to anoxia/re-oxygenation (A/R), and tested the effects of ceftazidime, an antibiotic previously demonstrated to possess antioxidant properties. Two A/R models were performed on type II pneumocytes (A549 cell line), either on cells attached to culture dishes (monolayer A/R model; 3.5 h of anoxia, 30 min of re-oxygenation) or after cell detachment (suspension A/R model; 1 h of anoxia, 10 min of re-oxygenation). Ceftazidime and selective inhibitors (SOD, Tiron, L-NMMA) were added before anoxia. Free radical production was assessed by the EPR spin trapping technique. Oxygen consumption was monitored, in parallel with EPR studies, in the suspension A/R model. The production of free radical species was demonstrated by the generation of PBN-radical adducts: (a(N) = 15.2 G) in the monolayer A/R model and a six-line EPR spectrum (a(N) = 15.7 G and a(H) = 2.7 G) in the suspension A/R model. A kinetic study performed by oximetry, in parallel with EPR spectroscopy, demonstrated marked alterations of the cell respiratory function and that the free radical production started during anoxia and increased during re-oxygenation. In the suspension A/R model, the amplitude of EPR spectra were decreased upon the addition of 200 U/ml SOD (37% inhibition), 0.1 mM Tiron (67% inhibition) and 1 mM L-NMMA (43% inhibition). Addition of 1 mM ceftazidime decreased the amplitude of EPR spectra (37% inhibition) in both A/R models. Complementary in vitro EPR studies demonstrated that CAZ scavenged the hydroxyl radical (produced by the Fenton reaction). The protective effect of ceftazidime in the cell model could thus be linked to its ability to scavenge superoxide anions, nitrogen-derived species and hydroxyl radicals. [less ▲]

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See detailThe expression of IL-1 β, iNOS and COX-2 genes by human chondrocytes is differentially regulated by reactive oxygen species
Mathy-Hartert, M; Deby, GP; Ayache, N et al

in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2001), 9SB

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See detailInterleukine-1 β regulation of transforming growth factor-β1 expression in articular chondrocytes : influence of aceclofenac
Andriamanalijaona, R; Ayache, N; Mathy-Hartert, M et al

in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2001), 9SB

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See detailExpression of transforming growth factors and their receptors is differentially modulated by reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide in human articular chondocytes
Ayache, N; Boumediene, K; Mathy-Hartert, M et al

in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2001), 9SB

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See detailThe expression of IL-1bêta, iNOS and COX-2 genes by human chondrocytes in differentially regulated by reactive oxygen species
Henrotin, Yves ULg; Mathy-Hartert, M; Deby, GP et al

in Clinical Rheumatology (2001), 20

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See detailRegulation by reactive oxygen species (ROS) of interleukin-1 bêta, nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2 production by human chondrocytes
Henrotin, Yves ULg; Mathy-Hartert, M; Ayache, N et al

in Clinical Rheumatology (2001), 20

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See detailThe antioxidant properties of non stroidal anti-inflammatory drugs
Henrotin, Yves ULg; Mouithys-Mickalad, Ange ULg; Mathy-Hartert, M et al

in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2000), 8

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See detailEffects of antioxidants on interleukin-1β, nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2 production by human chondrocytes
Mathy-Hartert, M; Ayache, N; Boumediene, K et al

in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2000), 8

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See detailSynthesis and evaluation of non-carboxylic pyridinic derivatives as cyclooxygenase inhibitors
Dogne, J.-M.; De Leval, X.; Delarge, J. et al

in Mediators of Inflammation (2000), 9

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See detailComparative effects of nimesulide, nimesulide L-lysine and nimesulide L-lysine L-arginine on human articular chondrocytes in vitro
De Leval, X.; Dogné, Jean-Michel ULg; Delarge, J. et al

in Mediators of Inflammation (2000), 9

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See detailPlasma Myeloperoxidase Level and Polymorphonuclear Leukocyte Activation in Horses Suffering from Large Intestinal Obstruction Requiring Surgery: Preliminary Results
Grulke, Sigrid ULg; Benbarek, Hama; Caudron, I. et al

in Canadian Journal of Veterinary Research = Revue Canadienne de Recherche Vétérinaire (1999), 63(2), 142-7

Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a specific enzyme of neutrophil azurophilic granules with a strong oxidative activity. Thanks to a radioimmunoassay of equine myeloperoxidase, the authors have observed a ... [more ▼]

Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a specific enzyme of neutrophil azurophilic granules with a strong oxidative activity. Thanks to a radioimmunoassay of equine myeloperoxidase, the authors have observed a significantly higher plasma level of MPO in horses operated for strangulation obstruction of the large intestine (n = 6) than in horses suffering from a non-strangulating displacement of the large intestine (n = 9). For the 2 groups, 3 phases were distinguished: reception (P1), intensive care (P2) and terminal phase (P3). The mean peak values of MPO for these phases were 121.6 ng/mL (P1), 168.6 ng/mL (P2), and 107.0 ng/mL (P3) for the non-strangulating group, and 242.6 ng/mL (P1); 426.0 ng/mL (P2), and 379.5 ng/mL (P3) for the strangulation group. The variations of the mean peak values of plasma MPO were significantly different between the 2 groups and between the different phases. A significant increase of the least square means of MPO was observed between P1 and P2. A significant decrease of the least square means of the number of circulating leukocytes was observed between P1 and P3. Polymorphonuclear neutrophil activation could play a major role in the pathogenesis of acute abdominal disease and endotoxic shock. [less ▲]

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See detailPerfluorocarbons as oxygen carriers
Lamy, Maurice ULg; Mathy-Hartert, M.; Deby, Ginette ULg

in Sibbald, W. J.; Messmer, K.; Fink, M. P. (Eds.) Tissue oxygenation in acute medicine (1998)

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See detailEffects of Perfluorocarbon Emulsions on Cultured Human Endothelial Cells
Mathy-Hartert, M.; Krafft, M. P.; Deby, Christiane ULg et al

in Artificial Cells, Blood Substitutes, & Immobilization Biotechnology (1997), 25(6), 563-75

Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) and their emulsions (PFCEs) were used in organ preservation before transplantation, but not in organ perfusion. Our purpose was to achieve organ perfusion with a PFCE at room ... [more ▼]

Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) and their emulsions (PFCEs) were used in organ preservation before transplantation, but not in organ perfusion. Our purpose was to achieve organ perfusion with a PFCE at room temperature or at 37 degrees C, i. e. with oxygenation, to prevent damages related to reoxygenation after hypoxia. Therefore, we first investigated the effect of such emulsions on endothelial cells, the first cells to be in contact with the emulsion. A stem emulsion was prepared from perfluorooctyl bromide (90% w/v), emulsified with egg yolk phospholipids (2% w/v) and stabilized with a mixed fluorocarbon-hydrocarbon "molecular dowel" (1.4% w/v) (droplets of ca 0.2 micron in diameter). This emulsion was found to be stable when diluted with cell culture media or organ preservation fluids. Endothelial cells from human umbilical vein (HUVECs) were cultured in multiwell plates in M199 medium (with growth factors, 10% foetal calf serum and 5% human serum). Confluent cells were incubated overnight with 51Cr, washed and overlayed with M199 (control) or the above PFCE diluted 2x or 4x with M199 (test). After incubation, the cytotoxicity of the PFCEs was estimated by measuring 51Cr release and observing cell morphology by electron and light microscopy. The percentages of released 51Cr were identical to those of the control cells for the 2x, 3x or 4x diluted PFCEs at 4, 25 or 37 degrees C. After return to the M199 medium, the cells grew and multiplied normally. We conclude that the diluted PFCEs were devoid of cytotoxicity. The 2x diluted PFCE was however partially taken up by the cells: by microscopy, we observed intracellular PFC droplets and by density gradient analysis we found a slight increase in cellular density. The diluted PFCEs were compared to classical organ preservation solutions : HUVECs were incubated with UW (University of Wisconsin) or EC (EuroCollins) solutions at +4 and 37 degrees C (3, 17 or 24 h of incubation). The solutions were observed to be toxic to the cells under these conditions, with cell mortality after return to the M199 medium. This cytotoxicity may be attributed to the high K+ concentration of UW and EC, since similar assays performed on HUVECs with Hank's solution adjusted to 100 mM K+ showed a similar % of 51Cr release. UW and EC are therefore not acceptable as dilution media for PFCEs. [less ▲]

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See detailBactericidal activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa is acquired by cultured human monocyte-derived macrophages after uptake of myeloperoxidase.
Mathy-Hartert, M.; Deby, Ginette ULg; Melin, Pierrette ULg et al

in Experientia (1996), 52(2), 167-74

Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is an enzyme located within polymorphonuclear neutrophils capable of producing cytotoxic oxidant species that are particularly active against bacteria with polysaccharide capsules ... [more ▼]

Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is an enzyme located within polymorphonuclear neutrophils capable of producing cytotoxic oxidant species that are particularly active against bacteria with polysaccharide capsules. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (10(6) bacteria per 1ml) are killed within 1 h in vitro by a MPO/H2O2/C1- system (48mU=132ng of MPO). The question arose as to whether human macrophages would acquire cytotoxic activity when loaded with this enzyme. Monocytes were therefore isolated from human blood and cultured for up to ten days to induce maturation to macrophages. These cells lost endogenous MPO within five days while H2O2 production in response to stimulation by phorbol myristate acetate (10(-6)M) decreased to 23% within ten days. On the other hand, their capacity to take up exogenous MPO increased fourfold from day three to day ten. Human macrophages cultured from eight days (when both H2O2 production and MPO uptake were sufficient) were therefore used to study the effects of MPO uptake on cytocidal activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. After a 1 h MPO loading period, macrophages (5X10(5) cells per ml) were incubated in the presence of bacteria (0.5 to 2X10(6) bacteria per ml) for 2 h at 37 degrees C. At a bacteria/macrophage ratio of 1, only 34.8+/-7.0% of bacteria survived (compared to killing by non-loaded macrophages), while 74.4+/-9.3% survived at a ratio of 4. From these results, we conclude that loading macrophages with exogenous MPO could enhance their microbicidal activity, suggesting a potentially useful therapeutic application. [less ▲]

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See detailInactivation of alpha(2)-Macroglobulin by Activated Human Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes.
Deby, Ginette ULg; Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg; Camus, Gérard et al

in Mediators of Inflammation (1994), 3(2), 117-23

The proteolytic activity of trypsin releases the dye Remazol Brilliant Blue from its high molecular weight substrate, the skin powder (Hide Powder Azure, Sigma), with an increase in absorbance at 595 nm ... [more ▼]

The proteolytic activity of trypsin releases the dye Remazol Brilliant Blue from its high molecular weight substrate, the skin powder (Hide Powder Azure, Sigma), with an increase in absorbance at 595 nm. Active alpha(2)- macroglobulin (80 mug/ml) totally inhibits the proteolytic activity of trypsin (14 mug/ml) by trapping this protease. But after a 20 min incubation of alpha(2)-macroglobulin at 37 degrees C with 2 x 10(6) human polymorphonuclear leukocytes activated by N-formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (10(-7) M) and cytochalasin B (10(-8) M), 100% of trypsin activity was recovered, indicating a total inactivation of alpha(2)-macroglobuHn. Incubation with granulocyte myeloperoxidase also inactivates alpha(2)-macroglobulin. Hypochlorous acid, a by-product of myeloperoxidase activity, at a concentration of 10(-7) M also inactivates alpha(2)-macroglobulin, which indicates that an important cause of alpha(2)-macroglobulin inactivation by activated polymorphonuclear leukocytes could be the activity of myeloperoxidase. [less ▲]

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See detailLocalisation des séquences régulatrices de la transcription. Application aux gènes de la famille prolactine.
Belayew, A.; Bellefroid, E.; Berwaer, M. et al

in Annales d'Endocrinologie (1986), 47

We are studying nucleotide sequences responsible for the regulation of eukaryotic gene expression. Our test system comprises the human genes coding for prolactin (hPRL), growth hormone (hGH-N) and ... [more ▼]

We are studying nucleotide sequences responsible for the regulation of eukaryotic gene expression. Our test system comprises the human genes coding for prolactin (hPRL), growth hormone (hGH-N) and placental lactogen (hCS-B). We have cloned these genes and are searching within their sequences for in vitro binding sites of the human glucocorticoid receptor on the hGH-N and hCS-B genes; the in vivo activity of such DNA sequences by assaying hybrid gene expression in transfected cells; in vivo "enhancer" activity of different hPRL gene fragments linked to a marker gene and transfected in cultured cells. [less ▲]

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