References of "Massion, Paul"
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See detailIncidence and risk factors for early renal dysfunction after liver transplantation.
WIESEN, Patricia ULg; MASSION, Paul ULg; JORIS, Jean ULg et al

in World journal of transplantation (2016), 6(1), 220-232

AIM: To determine renal dysfunction post liver transplantation, its incidence and risk factors in patients from a Belgian University Hospital. METHODS: Orthotopic liver transplantations performed from ... [more ▼]

AIM: To determine renal dysfunction post liver transplantation, its incidence and risk factors in patients from a Belgian University Hospital. METHODS: Orthotopic liver transplantations performed from January 2006 until September 2012 were retrospectively reviewed (n = 187). Patients with no renal replacement therapy (RRT) before transplantation were classified into four groups according to their highest creatinine plasma level during the first postoperative week. The first group had a peak creatinine level below 12 mg/L, the second group between 12 and 20 mg/L, the third group between 20 and 35 mg/L, and the fourth above 35 mg/L. In addition, patients who needed RRT during the first week after transplantation were also classified into the fourth group. Perioperative parameters were recorded as risk factors, namely age, sex, body mass index (BMI), length of preoperative hospital stay, prior bacterial infection within one month, preoperative ascites, preoperative treatment with beta-blocker, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, preoperative creatinine and bilirubin levels, donor status (cardiac death or brain death), postoperative lactate level, need for intraoperative vasopressive drugs, surgical revision, mechanical ventilation for more than 24 h, postoperative bilirubin and transaminase peak levels, postoperative hemoglobin level, amount of perioperative blood transfusions and type of immunosuppression. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed using logistic ordinal regression method. Post hoc analysis of the hemostatic agent used was also done. RESULTS: There were 78 patients in group 1 (41.7%), 46 in group 2 (24.6%), 38 in group 3 (20.3%) and 25 in group 4 (13.4%). Twenty patients required RRT: 13 (7%) during the first week after transplantation. Using univariate analysis, the severity of renal dysfunction was correlated with presence of ascites and prior bacterial infection, preoperative bilirubin, urea and creatinine level, need for surgical revision, use of vasopressor, postoperative mechanical ventilation, postoperative bilirubin and urea, aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT), and hemoglobin levels and the need for transfusion. The multivariate analysis showed that BMI (OR = 1.1, P = 0.004), preoperative creatinine level (OR = 11.1, P < 0.0001), use of vasopressor (OR = 3.31, P = 0.0002), maximal postoperative bilirubin level (OR = 1.44, P = 0.044) and minimal postoperative hemoglobin level (OR = 0.059, P = 0.0005) were independent predictors of early post-liver transplantation renal dysfunction. Neither donor status nor ASAT levels had significant impact on early postoperative renal dysfunction in multivariate analysis. Absence of renal dysfunction (group 1) was also predicted by the intraoperative hemostatic agent used, independently of the extent of bleeding and of the preoperative creatinine level. CONCLUSION: More than half of receivers experienced some degree of early renal dysfunction after liver transplantation. Main predictors were preoperative renal dysfunction, postoperative anemia and vasopressor requirement. [less ▲]

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See detailQuelle place pour le test de génération de thrombine au sein du laboratoire de biologie clinique?
LECUT, Christelle ULg; PETERS, Pierre ULg; MASSION, Paul ULg et al

in Annales de Biologie Clinique (2015), 73(2), 137-149

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See detailTowards targeted early burn care: lessons from a European survey.
ROUSSEAU, Anne-Françoise ULg; MASSION, Paul ULg; LAUNGANI, Alexis ULg et al

in Journal of Burn Care & Research (2014), 35

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See detailIdentification of biomarkers of hemostatic, endothelial and immune function in sepsis
GOTHOT, André ULg; GOSSET, Christian ULg; FOGUENNE, Jacques ULg et al

in Belgian Journal of Hematology (2013)

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See detailInsulin clearance during hyper-insulinemia euglycemia therapy
Penning, Sophie ULg; MASSION, Paul ULg; Pretty, Christopher ULg et al

in Proceedings of the 11th Belgian Day on Biomedical Engineering (2012, December)

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See detailInsulin clearance during hyper-insulinemia euglycemia therapy
Penning, Sophie ULg; MASSION, Paul ULg; Pretty, Christopher ULg et al

Poster (2012, December)

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See detailSecond pilot trials of the STAR-Liege protocol for tight glycemic control in critically ill patients
Penning, Sophie ULg; Le Compte, Aaron J.; MASSION, Paul ULg et al

in BioMedical Engineering OnLine (2012)

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See detailAcute burn care : state of the art in Europe
ROUSSEAU, Anne-Françoise ULg; LEDOUX, Didier ULg; MASSION, Paul ULg et al

Poster (2012, September)

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See detailInsulin Kinetics during Hyper-Insulinemia Euglycemia Therapy (HIET)
Penning, Sophie ULg; MASSION, Paul ULg; Le Compte, Aaron J. et al

in Proceedings of the 8th IFAC Symposium on Biological and Medical Systems (2012, August)

Hyper-insulinemia euglycemia therapy (HIET) is a supra-physiological insulin dosing protocol used in acute cardiac failure to reduce dependency on inotropes to augment or generate cardiac output, and is ... [more ▼]

Hyper-insulinemia euglycemia therapy (HIET) is a supra-physiological insulin dosing protocol used in acute cardiac failure to reduce dependency on inotropes to augment or generate cardiac output, and is based on the inotropic effects of insulin at high doses up to 45-250x normal daily dose. Such high insulin doses are managed using intravenous glucose infusion to control glycemia and prevent hypoglycemia. However, both insulin dosing and glycemic control in these patients is managed ad-hoc. This research examines a selection of clinical data to determine the effect of high insulin dosing on renal clearance and insulin sensitivity, to assess the feasibility of using model-based methods to control and guide these protocols. The results show that the model and, in particular, the modeled renal clearance constant are adequate and capture measured data well, although not perfectly. Equally, insulin sensitivity over time is similar to broader critical care cohorts in level and variability, and these results are the first time they have been presented for this cohort. While more data is needed to confirm and further specify these results, it is clear that the model used is adequate for controlling HIET in a model-based framework. [less ▲]

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See detailInsulin Kinetics during Hyper-Insulinemia Euglycemia Therapy (HIET)
Penning, Sophie ULg; MASSION, Paul ULg; Le Compte, Aaron J. et al

Conference (2012, August)

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See detailPrise en charge des brûlés en phase aigue : enquête européenne.
ROUSSEAU, Anne-Françoise ULg; LEDOUX, Didier ULg; MASSION, Paul ULg et al

in Brûlures. Revue Française de Brûlologie (2012, June), XIII(2), 60

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See detailProcalcitonin usefulness for the initiation of antibiotic treatment in intensive care unit patients.
LAYIOS, Nathalie ULg; LAMBERMONT, Bernard ULg; CANIVET, Jean-Luc ULg et al

in Critical Care Medicine (2012), 40(8), 2304-9

OBJECTIVES: : To test the usefulness of procalcitonin serum level for the reduction of antibiotic consumption in intensive care unit patients. DESIGN: : Single-center, prospective, randomized controlled ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: : To test the usefulness of procalcitonin serum level for the reduction of antibiotic consumption in intensive care unit patients. DESIGN: : Single-center, prospective, randomized controlled study. SETTING: : Five intensive care units from a tertiary teaching hospital. PATIENTS: : All consecutive adult patients hospitalized for > 48 hrs in the intensive care unit during a 9-month period. INTERVENTIONS: : Procalcitonin serum level was obtained for all consecutive patients suspected of developing infection either on admission or during intensive care unit stay. The use of antibiotics was more or less strongly discouraged or recommended according to the Muller classification. Patients were randomized into two groups: one using the procalcitonin results (procalcitonin group) and one being blinded to the procalcitonin results (control group). The primary end point was the reduction of antibiotic use expressed as a proportion of treatment days and of daily defined dose per 100 intensive care unit days using a procalcitonin-guided approach. Secondary end points included: a posteriori assessment of the accuracy of the infectious diagnosis when using procalcitonin in the intensive care unit and of the diagnostic concordance between the intensive care unit physician and the infectious-disease specialist. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: : There were 258 patients in the procalcitonin group and 251 patients in the control group. A significantly higher amount of withheld treatment was observed in the procalcitonin group of patients classified by the intensive care unit clinicians as having possible infection. This, however, did not result in a reduction of antibiotic consumption. The treatment days represented 62.6 +/- 34.4% and 57.7 +/- 34.4% of the intensive care unit stays in the procalcitonin and control groups, respectively (p = .11). According to the infectious-disease specialist, 33.8% of the cases in which no infection was confirmed, had a procalcitonin value >1microg/L and 14.9% of the cases with confirmed infection had procalcitonin levels <0.25 microg/L. The ability of procalcitonin to differentiate between certain or probable infection and possible or no infection, upon initiation of antibiotic treatment was low, as confirmed by the receiving operating curve analysis (area under the curve = 0.69). Finally, procalcitonin did not help improve concordance between the diagnostic confidence of the infectious-disease specialist and the ICU physician. CONCLUSIONS: : Procalcitonin measuring for the initiation of antimicrobials did not appear to be helpful in a strategy aiming at decreasing the antibiotic consumption in intensive care unit patients. [less ▲]

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See detailPersistent hypocoagulability in patients with septic shock predicts greater hospital mortality: impact of impaired thrombin generation.
MASSION, Paul ULg; PETERS, Pierre ULg; LEDOUX, Didier ULg et al

in Intensive Care Medicine (2012), 38(8), 1326-35

PURPOSE: Sepsis induces hypercoagulability, hypofibrinolysis, microthrombosis, and endothelial dysfunction leading to multiple organ failure. However, not all studies reported benefit from anticoagulation ... [more ▼]

PURPOSE: Sepsis induces hypercoagulability, hypofibrinolysis, microthrombosis, and endothelial dysfunction leading to multiple organ failure. However, not all studies reported benefit from anticoagulation for patients with severe sepsis, and time courses of coagulation abnormalities in septic shock are poorly documented. Therefore, the aim of this prospective observational cohort study was to describe the coagulation profile of patients with septic shock and to determine whether alterations of the profile are associated with hospital mortality. METHODS: Thirty-nine patients with septic shock on ICU admission were prospectively included in the study. From admission to day 7, analytical coagulation tests, thrombin generation (TG) assays, and thromboelastometric analyses were performed and tested for association with survival. RESULTS: Patients with septic shock presented on admission prolongation of prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), increased consumption of most procoagulant factors as well as both delay and deficit in TG, all compatible with a hypocoagulable state compared with reference values (P < 0.001). Time courses revealed a persistent hypocoagulability profile in non-survivors as compared with survivors. From multiple logistic regression, prolonged aPTT (P = 0.007) and persistence of TG deficit (P = 0.024) on day 3 were strong predictors of mortality, independently from disease severity scores, disseminated intravascular coagulation score, and standard coagulation tests on admission. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with septic shock present with hypocoagulability at the time of ICU admission. Persistence of hypocoagulability assessed by prolonged aPTT and unresolving deficit in TG on day 3 after onset of septic shock is associated with greater hospital mortality. [less ▲]

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