References of "Massart, Sébastien"
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See detailStudy of volatile organic compounds active against barley pathogens
De Clerck, Caroline ULg; Kaddes, Amine ULg; Fiers, Marie et al

Conference (2017, May 23)

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See detailStudy of VOCs in the interaction between Banana and Foc TR4
Berhal, Chadi ULg; De Clerck, Caroline ULg; LEVICEK, Carolina et al

Poster (2017, May 23)

Banana fruit (Musa sp.) ranks fourth in term of worldwide production, and has economical and nutritional key values. The popular and most dominant variety of the dessert banana group is the Cavendish ... [more ▼]

Banana fruit (Musa sp.) ranks fourth in term of worldwide production, and has economical and nutritional key values. The popular and most dominant variety of the dessert banana group is the Cavendish variety. Nowadays, the Cavendish is endangered by the newly emergent race of the Panama disease, caused by the fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cubense TR4 (Foc TR4). Despite the importance of the Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), which are secondary metabolites with a high vapour pressure, in their utility in the plant protection processes, they were never documented as a way to manage this disease on Cavendish. Thus, the aim of this PhD thesis is to study the VOCs in the specific interaction Cavendish/Foc TR4, as a way to manage this threat. Based on the work previously done with other plants at Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech/University of Liège/Belgium, a protocol was optimized for the extraction of the banana plant’s VOCs. And in parallel, models of in-vitro and in-vivo inoculations are under development, in order to distinguish the root zone from the upper part of the plant in the study. The results of the first analysis showed that the majority of the Cavendish VOCs belongs to the terpenes group, as well as ketones and an organic ester. The identified key VOCs of the interaction will be subject to toxicity tests, in order to determine their effect on the development of the plant and the pathogen. The banana plant is a staple food for more than 400 Million people in the world, while this disease persists as a major threat for its production, and this original study could contribute to the fight against this threatening disease. [less ▲]

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See detailFirst Characterisation of Volatile Organic Compounds Emitted by Banana Plants
Berhal, Chadi ULg; De Clerck, Caroline ULg; Fauconnier, Marie-Laure ULg et al

in Scientific Reports (2017)

Banana (Musa sp.) ranks fourth in term of worldwide fruit production, and has economical and nutritional key values. The Cavendish cultivars correspond to more than 90% of the production of dessert banana ... [more ▼]

Banana (Musa sp.) ranks fourth in term of worldwide fruit production, and has economical and nutritional key values. The Cavendish cultivars correspond to more than 90% of the production of dessert banana while cooking cultivars are widely consumed locally around the banana belt production area. Many plants, if not all, produce Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) as a means of communication with their environment. Although flower and fruit VOCs have been studied for banana, the VOCs produced by the plant have never been identified despite their importance in plant health and development. A volatile collection methodology was optimized to improve the sensitivity and reproducibility of VOCs analysis from banana plants. We have identified 11 VOCs for the Cavendish, mainly (E,E)-α-farnesene (87.90 ± 11.28 ng/μl), methyl salicylate (33.82 ± 14.29) and 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one (29.60 ± 11.66), and 14 VOCs for the Pacific Plantain cultivar, mainly (Z,E)-α-farnesene (799.64 ± 503.15), (E,E)-α-farnesene (571.24 ± 381.70) and (E) β ocimene (241.76 ± 158.49). This exploratory study paves the way for an in-depth characterisation of VOCs emitted by Musa plants. [less ▲]

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See detail"Il vaut mieux prévenir que guérir", l'adage s'applique également aux plantes
Massart, Sébastien ULg

Article for general public (2017)

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See detailLessons learned from the virus indexing of Musa germplasm: insights from a multiyear collaboration
De Clerck, Caroline ULg; Crew, Kathy; Van den Houwe, Ines et al

in Annals of Applied Biology (2017)

The Bioversity International Transit Center (ITC) for banana hosts more than 1500 accessions largely covering the genetic diversity of the genus Musa. Its objective is to conserve this genetic diversity ... [more ▼]

The Bioversity International Transit Center (ITC) for banana hosts more than 1500 accessions largely covering the genetic diversity of the genus Musa. Its objective is to conserve this genetic diversity and to supply plant materials to users worldwide. All the Musa accessions must be tested for virus presence and, if infected, virus elimination must be attempted, to enable the supply of virus-free plant material. An international collaborative effort launched under the auspices of Bioversity International (2007–2013) finally led to the implementation of a two-step process to test the accessions. The first step, called pre-indexing, involved only molecular tests and was designed as a pre-screen of new germplasm lines or existing accessions to reduce the need for post-entry virus therapy and repeated virus indexing. The second step, called full indexing, was performed on either older existing accessions or newer accessions which tested negative during pre-indexing, and involvedmolecular tests, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and symptom observation. In total, 270 germplasm lines (434 samples) were pre-indexed; while full indexing was carried out on 243 accessions (68 of which had been pre-indexed). A significant proportion of the samples tested during pre-indexing was infected with at least one virus (68%), showing the utility of this early pre-screening step. Banana streak OL virus and Banana mild mosaic virus were the most commonly detected viruses during both pre- and full indexing. For 22 accessions, viral particles were observed by TEM in full indexing while the molecular tests were negative, underlining the importance of combining various detection techniques. After full indexing, viruses were not detected in 166 accessions, which were then released for international distribution from the ITC. This publication exemplifies how the practical application of diagnostic protocols can raise fundamental questions related to their appropriate use in routine practice and the need for their continuous monitoring and improvement after their first publication. [less ▲]

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See detailFirst Report of Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum Associated with the Psyllid Bactericera trigonica Hodkinson on Carrots in Northern Africa
Tahzima, R.; Massart, Sébastien ULg; Achbani, E.H. et al

in Plant Disease (2017), 101(1), 242

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See detailVirus Discovery: After the deluge ... ...the framework!!!
Massart, Sébastien ULg

Conference (2017)

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See detailDisease Note. First Report of Persimmon Cryptic Virus in Spain
Ruiz-Garcia, A-B; Chamberland, N.; Martinez, C. et al

in Journal of Plant Pathology [=JPP] (2017), 99(1),

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See detailStudy of the volatile organic compounds in the interaction between banana plants and the fungal disease Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cubense Tropical Race 4 (FocTR4)
Berhal, Chadi ULg; De Clerck, Caroline ULg; LEVICEK, CAROLINA et al

Conference (2016, October 11)

Banana fruit (Musa sp.) ranks fourth in term of worldwide production, and has economical and nutritional key values. Cavendish is the popular and most dominant variety of the dessert banana group ... [more ▼]

Banana fruit (Musa sp.) ranks fourth in term of worldwide production, and has economical and nutritional key values. Cavendish is the popular and most dominant variety of the dessert banana group. Nowadays, it is endangered by the emergent race of the Panama disease, caused by Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cubense TR4 (Foc TR4). Despite the importance of the Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), which are secondary metabolites with a high vapour pressure, and their role in plant protection, they have never been documented as a way to manage this disease on Cavendish. Thus, the aim of this PhD thesis is to study the VOCs in the specific interaction Cavendish/Foc TR4, as a way to manage this threat. Based on the work previously done with other plants at Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech, a protocol was optimized for the extraction of the banana plant’s VOCs. In parallel, models of in-vitro and in-vivo inoculations are under development to distinguish the VOCs emitted by the root zone and those emitted by the aerial part of the plant. The results of the first analysis showed that the majority of the Cavendish VOCs belongs to the terpenes group, as well as ketones and an organic ester. The VOCs specifically emitted during the plant-pathogen interaction will be studied more in depth by evaluating their effect on the plant and the pathogen. At long term, and depending on the results, agro-ecological applications of this knowledge could include breeding for new variety or combining banana with other plants expressing VOCs against Foc TR4, applying VOCs on field to stimulate plant defences or to contain the pathogen. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of high-wheat bran diet on sows’ microbiota, performances and progeny’s growth and health
Leblois, Julie ULg; Bindelle, Jérôme ULg; Dehareng, Frédéric et al

Conference (2016, September 02)

Finding alternatives to antimicrobial growth promoters is part of the goal of improving sustainability in pig production. Dietary fibres are considered as health-promoting substances acting on pigs’ ... [more ▼]

Finding alternatives to antimicrobial growth promoters is part of the goal of improving sustainability in pig production. Dietary fibres are considered as health-promoting substances acting on pigs’ microbiota. This study aimed to investigate whether the enrichment of sows’ diet with high levels of wheat bran (WB) could impact the performances of sows and piglets’ health. Seven sows were fed a control diet (CON) and 8 sows a WB diet from day 43 of gestation (WB 240 g/kg DM) until the end of the lactation period (WB 140 g/kg DM). Diets were formulated to be iso-energetic and iso-nitrogenous by changing the proportions of some ingredients. Faeces were sampled at different time points (before treatment, during treatment: in gestation and lactation) to determine microbiota composition (sequencing with Illumina MiSeq). Milk was sampled weekly to determine lactose, fat and protein concentration by mid-infrared technology and IgA and IgG contents by ELISA. Before weaning (d26-27), piglets were euthanized, intestinal contents and tissues sampled for further analyses. Zootechnical performances of sows and piglets were recorded. Statistical analyses were performed using the SAS MIXED procedure and repeated measurements. Treatment never impacted piglets’ weight (P=0.51). Sows’ ingestion during the lactation period was comparable between both treatments until the last 4 days of lactation where the percentage of target ingestion was significantly (P<0.001) lower for the WB (66%) compared to the CON group (89%). No effect on sows’ backfat and weight changes was observed. An increased abundance of Lactobacillus spp. in feces of the WB group was observed in gestation before and after diet change (8.8% vs 15.1% of total bacteria). However, for the overall genera changes between treatments, it only seems to occur for minor groups of bacteria. Milk protein, fat, IgG and IgA were not affected by treatment, but a time-effect (P<0.001) was observed while treatment impacted (P<0.05) lactose content. In conclusion, sows’ performances were not affected by the high WB diet and more research on the piglets’ samples is foreseen. [less ▲]

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See detailPresentation of germplasm Health Unit-Gembloux
Massart, Sébastien ULg

Conference (2016, September)

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See detailEpidemiology and Molecular Variability of little cherry virus in Belgium
Tahzima, Rachid; Peusens, Gertie; Belïen, Tim et al

Conference (2016, September)

Detailed reference viewed: 38 (0 ULg)