References of "Marquet, Manon"
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See detailInteractions between stereotype threat, subjective aging, and memory in older adults
Marquet, Manon ULiege; Missotten, Pierre ULiege; Dardenne, Benoît ULiege et al

in Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition (2017)

This study examined whether the effects of stereotype threat on memory and subjective age were moderated by positive age stereotypes and self-perceptions of aging among older adults. Perceived threat as a ... [more ▼]

This study examined whether the effects of stereotype threat on memory and subjective age were moderated by positive age stereotypes and self-perceptions of aging among older adults. Perceived threat as a mechanism underlying these effects was also explored. Results showed that stereotype threat (high vs. low threat) did not affect the dependent variables. Moreover, self-perceptions of aging did not moderate the effect of stereotype threat on the dependent variables. However, for people with more positive age stereotypes, older people under high threat perceived more threat than people under low threat. This could be explained by an effect of age stereotypes in the high-threat group: the more positive age stereotypes held by participants, the more they perceived threat, which in turn decreased their memory performance and made them feel mentally older. We hypothesized that age group identity is stronger in people with more positive age stereotypes, which increase perceived threat. [less ▲]

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See detailPsychological Predictors and Consequences of Hearing Health Behaviors in Older Adults
Marquet, Manon ULiege; Chasteen, Alison L; Plaks, Jason E et al

Poster (2017, September 22)

Introduction: Hearing loss is a common chronic condition affecting older adults in Western populations [1, 2]. Even if older adults could benefit from hearing aid use, they are reluctant to wear them [1 ... [more ▼]

Introduction: Hearing loss is a common chronic condition affecting older adults in Western populations [1, 2]. Even if older adults could benefit from hearing aid use, they are reluctant to wear them [1]. The purpose of the present study was twofold: a) to examine whether older adults’ implicit theories regarding the modifiability of abilities in general would predict their hearing health behaviors; and (b) to assess consequences of these behaviors on subjective aging. Methods: One hundred and sixty-three older adults (Mean age = 68.62, SD = 5.40) completed, among other questionnaires, questions assessing their implicit theories of ability (i.e., seeing general abilities as fixed vs. improvable with effort [3]) and their subjective age (i.e., felt age, do age, look age, and interest age [4]). They also reported their perceptions of the benefits of various hearing health behaviors for slowing the effects of aging (i.e., getting their hearing tested and using hearing aids) as well as their intentions to engage in those behaviors. Results: We found that the more older people considered that abilities are alterable, the more they perceived hearing health behaviors as being beneficial, which in turn increased their intentions to engage in these behaviors. Also, the greater their intentions, the younger subjective age they reported. Key conclusions: These relationships between implicit theories, hearing health behaviors, and subjective age are particularly important to take into account. Indeed, neglecting hearing problems and experiencing an older subjective age may have detrimental health-related outcomes over time [5, 6]. 1. Feder, K., Michaud, D., Ramage-Morin, P., McNamee, J., & Beauregard, Y. (2015). Prevalence of hearing loss among Canadians aged 20 to 79: Audiometric results from the 2012/2013 Canadian Health Measures Survey. Health Reports, 26(7), 18-25. 2. Lin, F. R., Thorpe, R., Gordon-Salant, S., & Ferrucci, L. (2011). Hearing loss prevalence and risk factors among older adults in the United States. The Journals of Gerontology, Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, 66(5), 582-590. doi: doi:10.1093/gerona/glr002 3. Dweck, C. S. (1999). Self-theories: Their role in motivation, personality, and development. Philadephia, PA: Psychology Press. 4. Kastenbaum, R., Derbin, V., Sabatini, P., & Artt, S. (1972). “The ages of me”: Toward personal and interpersonal definitions of functional aging. The International Journal of Aging and Human Development, 3(2), 197-211. 5. Bainbridge, K. E., & Wallhagen, M. I. (2014). Hearing loss in an aging American population: Extent, impact, and management. Annual Review of Public Health, 35, 139-152. doi: 10.1146/annurev-publhealth-032013-182510 6. Kotter-Grühn, D., Kornadt, A. E., & Stephan, Y. (2015). Looking beyond chronological age: Current knowledge and future directions in the study of subjective age. Gerontology, 62(1), 86-93. doi: 10.1159/000438671 [less ▲]

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See detailCommunication of healthcare professionals: is there ageism?
Schroyen, Sarah ULiege; Adam, Stéphane ULiege; Marquet, Manon ULiege et al

in European Journal of Cancer Care (2017)

Elderspeak is often used when talking to older individuals and is characterized by a slower and/or louder speech, a patronizing tone, etc. A part of the reason of such communication can be found in the ... [more ▼]

Elderspeak is often used when talking to older individuals and is characterized by a slower and/or louder speech, a patronizing tone, etc. A part of the reason of such communication can be found in the actual context of negative view of aging. However, the link between view of aging and elderspeak has never been objectively studied in oncology. Therefore, 40 healthcare professionals (physicians and medical students) record a podcast where they have to explain an endocrine therapy to two fictional patients (40 vs 70 years old). Results show that when participants explained the treatment to the older patient, they used shorter utterances and made more repetitions. They also evoked fewer side effects such as sexual issues. Moreover, reduction of length of utterances and of word-per-minute rate was observed for older patient when participants have a positive view of aging but for both patients when they have a negative view of aging. In conclusion, physicians and medical students used elderspeak when they explained a treatment to older patients. Participants with a more negative view of aging also unconsciously talked slower and made shorter utterances to a 40 year-old patient. [less ▲]

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See detailThe link between self-perceptions of aging, cancer view and physical and mental health of older people with cancer: A cross-sectional study
Schroyen, Sarah ULiege; Marquet, Manon ULiege; Jerusalem, Guy ULiege et al

in Journal of Geriatric Oncology (2017), 8(1), 64-68

Objectives Older people may suffer from stigmas linked to cancer and aging. Although some studies suggested that a negative view of cancer may increase the level of depression, such an association has ... [more ▼]

Objectives Older people may suffer from stigmas linked to cancer and aging. Although some studies suggested that a negative view of cancer may increase the level of depression, such an association has never been studied in the elderly population. Similarly, even though it is established that a negative self-perception of aging has deleterious consequences on mental and physical health in normal aging, the influence in pathological contexts, such as oncology, has not been studied. The main aim of this study is thus to analyze the effect of these two stigmas on the health of elderly oncology patients. Materials and Methods 101 patients suffering from a cancer (breast, gynecological, lung or hematological) were seen as soon as possible after their diagnosis. Their self-perception of age, cancer view and health (physical and mental) was assessed. Results Multiple regressions showed that patients with a more negative self-perception of aging and/or more negative cancer view reported poorer global health. We also observed that negative self-perception of aging was associated with worse physical and mental health, whereas negative cancer views were only linked to worse mental health. No interaction was observed between these two stigmas, suggesting that their action is independent. Conclusion Older patients with cancer face double stigmatization, due to negative self-perception of aging and cancer, and these stigmas have impacts on global and mental health. Self-perception of aging is also linked to physical health. Longitudinal studies will be necessary to analyze the direction of the association between this double stigmatization and health. [less ▲]

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See detailVieillir en bonne santé dans une société âgiste...
Adam, Stéphane ULiege; Missotten, Pierre ULiege; Flamion, Allison ULiege et al

in NPG. Neurologie - Psychiatrie - Gériatrie (2017), 17

La vision actuelle du vieillissement est principalement négative, teintée du phénomène d’âgisme (c’est-à-dire toutes les formes de discrimination, de ségrégation ou de mépris fondées sur l’âge). Une telle ... [more ▼]

La vision actuelle du vieillissement est principalement négative, teintée du phénomène d’âgisme (c’est-à-dire toutes les formes de discrimination, de ségrégation ou de mépris fondées sur l’âge). Une telle image de la vieillesse n’est pas anodine. Dans cet article, nous passerons en revue les manifestations de l’âgisme dans notre vie quotidienne, ses origines, ses implications sur nos attitudes, de même que les conséquences qui en résultent pour les personnes âgées. Nous discuterons également de certains enjeux cliniques et éthiques en lien avec ces attitudes âgistes [less ▲]

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See detailAgeism in Belgium and Burundi: A comparative analysis
Marquet, Manon ULiege; Missotten, Pierre ULiege; Schroyen, Sarah ULiege et al

in Clinical Interventions in Aging (2016), 11

Background: Recent cross-cultural comparisons between Asian and Western cultures have shown that ageism arises more from the lack of availability of social and economic resources for older adults than ... [more ▼]

Background: Recent cross-cultural comparisons between Asian and Western cultures have shown that ageism arises more from the lack of availability of social and economic resources for older adults than from the culture itself. We tested this assumption by conducting a survey among people living in a least-developed country compared with a developed country. Methods: Twenty-seven Belgians living in Belgium, 29 Burundians living in Belgium and 32 Burundians living in Burundi were included in this study. Their attitudes toward older adults were assessed using several self-reported measures. Results: Statistical analyses confirmed that older people are more negatively perceived by Burundians living in Burundi than by Burundians and Belgians living in Belgium, whose attitudes did not differ from each other. Conclusion: Consistent with our hypothesis, our results suggest that the level of development of a country and more particularly the lack of government spending on older people (pension and healthcare systems) may contribute to their younger counterparts perceiving them more negatively. [less ▲]

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See detailAgeism and communication in oncology
Schroyen, Sarah ULiege; Adam, Stéphane ULiege; Marquet, Manon ULiege et al

Poster (2016, March 11)

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See detailVieillissement : Mieux comprendre pour mieux (inter)agir dans nos actes de soins!
Marquet, Manon ULiege; Schroyen, Sarah ULiege

Conference given outside the academic context (2016)

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See detailInfluence des stéréotypes sur les performances cognitives des personnes âgées
Marquet, Manon ULiege

Conference given outside the academic context (2016)

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See detailA Validation of the French Version of the Attitudes to Aging Questionnaire (AAQ): Factor Structure, Reliability and Validity
Marquet, Manon ULiege; Missotten, Pierre ULiege; Schroyen, Sarah ULiege et al

in Psychologica Belgica (2016), 56(2), 1-21

Introduction: The Attitudes to Aging Questionnaire (AAQ) was developed to measure attitudes toward the aging process as a personal experience from the perspective of older people. The present study aimed ... [more ▼]

Introduction: The Attitudes to Aging Questionnaire (AAQ) was developed to measure attitudes toward the aging process as a personal experience from the perspective of older people. The present study aimed to validate the French version of the AAQ. Participants and methods: This study examined factor structure, acceptability, reliability and validity of the AAQ’s French version in 238 Belgian adults aged 60 years or older. In addition, participants provided information on demographics, self-perception of their mental and physical health (single items), quality of life (WHOQOL-OLD) and social desirability (DS-36). Results: Exploratory Factor Analysis produced a three-factor solution accounting for 36.9% of the variance. No floor or ceiling effects were found. The internal consistency, measured by Cronbach’s alpha coefficients for the AAQ subscales were 0.62 (Physical Change), 0.74 (Psychological Growth), and 0.75 (Psychosocial Loss). A priori expected associations were found between AAQ subscales, self-reported health and quality of life, indicating good convergent validity. The scale also showed a good ability to discriminate between people with lower and higher education levels, supporting adequate known-groups validity. Finally, we confirmed the need to control for social desirability biases when assessing self-reported attitudes toward one’s own aging. Conclusion: The data support the usefulness of the French version of the AAQ for the assessment of attitudes toward their own aging in older people. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence des stéréotypes dans l'évaluation neuropsychologique
Marquet, Manon ULiege; Adam, Stéphane ULiege

in Amieva, Hélène; Bellin, Catherine; Maillet, Didier (Eds.) L’Evaluation Neuropsychologique : De la Norme à l’Exception (2016)

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See detailÂgisme et surestimation des difficultés cognitives des personnes âgées: une revue de la question
Marquet, Manon ULiege; Missotten, Pierre ULiege; Adam, Stéphane ULiege

in Gériatrie et Psychologie Neuropsychiatrie du Vieillissement (2016), 14(2), 177-186

Stigmatization related to age (i.e., ageism) is a widespread phenomenon in the modern industrial societies where older people are perceived as cognitively incompetent. Therefore negative stereotypes about ... [more ▼]

Stigmatization related to age (i.e., ageism) is a widespread phenomenon in the modern industrial societies where older people are perceived as cognitively incompetent. Therefore negative stereotypes about age-related cognitive decline may have a detrimental influence on older adults on their cognitive performance. The aim of the present review is to understand how stereotypes can influence the performance of the elderly on cognitive tests. We first describe the stereotype threat phenomenon by providing an overview of situations likely to produce stereotype threat, as well as contextual and personal characteristics that moderate its effects. Possible mechanisms underlying these influences on cognitive performance are also presented. Secondly, we address self-stereotyping, which explains long-term negative effects of stereotypes and their unconscious influence on older adults’ cognitive performance. However, some age stereotypes have also positive effects on aged people, as shown by some studies describing such beneficial effects of positive stereotypes on cognitive performance. Finally we try to understand why negative age stereotyping has a much stronger influence on important behavioral outcomes among older adults than does positive age stereotyping. Given all these results, we examine how negative age stereotypes may impact older adults’ cognitive performance in real-world settings such as during a cognitive assessment. [less ▲]

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See detailDo the elderly feel older after exposure to negative aging stereotypes?
Marquet, Manon ULiege; Missotten, Pierre ULiege; Adam, Stéphane ULiege

in International Psychogeriatrics (2016), 27(Supplement 1), 70-172

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See detailDo Burundians have a more positive perception of older people than immigrants or Belgians?
Marquet, Manon ULiege; Missotten, Pierre ULiege; Nindaba, Desiderate et al

in International Psychogeriatrics (2016), 27(Supplement 1), 70-172

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See detailVision sociétale du vieillissement normal et pathologique: conséquences trop méconnues par les cliniciens!
Marquet, Manon ULiege; Missotten, Pierre ULiege

Conference given outside the academic context (2015)

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See detailLe regard (peu optimiste) du soignant sur la personne âgée
Schroyen, Sarah ULiege; Missotten, Pierre ULiege; Marquet, Manon ULiege et al

in Medi-Sphere (2015), 469

L’âgisme (c’est-à-dire l’ensemble de nos stéréotypes liés à l’avancée en âge) a de nombreuses conséquences négatives tant pour le patient lui-même qu’au sein de la relation entre le patient et le ... [more ▼]

L’âgisme (c’est-à-dire l’ensemble de nos stéréotypes liés à l’avancée en âge) a de nombreuses conséquences négatives tant pour le patient lui-même qu’au sein de la relation entre le patient et le personnel soignant. Au cours de cet article, nous illustrerons les représentations du vieillissement prévalentes chez les soignants et aborderons brièvement les conséquences de l’âgisme sur leurs attitudes de soins. [less ▲]

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