References of "Markine-Goriaynoff, Nicolas"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Peer Reviewed
See detailEvolution of Bovine herpesvirus 4: recombination and transmission between African buffalo and cattle
Dewals, Benjamin G ULg; Thirion, Muriel; Markine-Goriaynoff, Nicolas et al

Poster (2007, November 23)

Bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV 4) has been isolated from cattle throughout the world, but virological and serological studies have suggested that the African buffalo is also a natural host for this virus. We ... [more ▼]

Bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV 4) has been isolated from cattle throughout the world, but virological and serological studies have suggested that the African buffalo is also a natural host for this virus. We have previously found that the Bo17 gene of BoHV-4 was acquired from an ancestor of the African buffalo, probably around 1.5 Myr ago. Analysis of the variation of the Bo17 gene sequence among BoHV-4 strains suggested a relatively ancient transmission of BoHV 4 from the buffalo to the Bos primigenius lineage, followed by a host dependent split between zebu and taurine BoHV 4 strains. In the present study, the evolutionary history of BoHV-4 was investigated by analysis of five gene sequences from each of nine strains representative of the viral species: three isolated from African buffalo in Kenya, and six from cattle from Europe, N. America and India. No two gene sequences had the same evolutionary tree, indicating that recombination has occurred between divergent lineages: six recombination events were delineated for these sequences. Nevertheless, exchange has been infrequent enough that a clonal evolutionary history of the strains could be discerned, upon which the recombination events were superimposed. The dates of divergence among BoHV-4 lineages were estimated from synonymous nucleotide substitution rates. The inferred evolutionary history suggests that African buffalo were the original natural reservoir of BoHV-4, and that there have been at least three independent transmissions from buffalo to cattle, probably via intermediate hosts, and – at least in the case of N. American strains – within the last 500 years. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailNatural antibody--complement dependent neutralization of bovine herpesvirus 4 by human serum
Machiels, Bénédicte ULg; Gillet, Laurent ULg; Brito, Sieberth Do Nascimento et al

in Microbes & Infection (2007), 9(14-15), 1530-1537

In contrast to most gammaherpesviruses, Bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4) has a broad range of host species both in vitro and in vivo. Several in vitro studies demonstrated that some human cell lines are ... [more ▼]

In contrast to most gammaherpesviruses, Bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4) has a broad range of host species both in vitro and in vivo. Several in vitro studies demonstrated that some human cell lines are sensitive or even permissive to BoHV-4. These observations led to the hypothesis that cross-species transmission of BoHV-4 could lead to human infections. In the present study, we investigate the sensitivity of BoHV-4 to neutralization by naïve human sera in order to determine if humans exhibit innate anti-viral activities against this virus. Our results demonstrate that human sera from naïve individuals, in contrast to the sera of naïve subjects from various animal species, neutralize BoHV-4 efficiently. A series of complementary experiments were performed to unravel the mechanism(s) of this neutralization. The data obtained in this study demonstrates that human serum neutralizes BoHV-4 in a complement dependent manner activated by natural antibodies raised against the Galalpha1-3Galbeta1-4GlcNAc-R epitope expressed by bovine cells [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 102 (29 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFelid herpesvirus 1 glycoprotein G is a structural protein that mediates the binding of chemokines on the viral envelope.
Costes, Bérénice ULg; Thirion, Muriel ULg; Dewals, Benjamin G ULg et al

in Microbes & Infection (2006), 8(11), 2657-67

Glycoprotein G (gG) orthologues have been described in several alphaherpesviruses. gG is expressed both as a membrane-anchored form on infected cells and as a secreted form. Recently, we reported that ... [more ▼]

Glycoprotein G (gG) orthologues have been described in several alphaherpesviruses. gG is expressed both as a membrane-anchored form on infected cells and as a secreted form. Recently, we reported that both forms of gG encoded by alphaherpesviruses infecting large herbivores and by Felid herpesvirus 1 (FeHV-1) bind with high affinity to a broad range of CXC, CC and C-chemokines. Based on the viral species, gG has been reported either as a structural or a non-structural protein. To date, the incorporation of FeHV-1 gG into virions has never been tested, nor the property of alphaherpesvirus structural gG to bind chemokines on the virion surface. In the present study, to address these questions, various FeHV-1 gG recombinant strains were produced using an original technique based on an infectious FeHV-1 BAC clone and restriction endonuclease mediated recombination. Using the recombinants produced, we were able to determine that FeHV-1 gG is a structural protein that acts as a chemokine-binding protein on the virion surface. In the light of these results, putative roles of gG in alphaherpesvirus infections are discussed, and an evolutionary scenario is proposed to explain the structural versus non-structural property of gG amongst alphaherpesviruses. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (7 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCloning of the genome of Alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 as an infectious and pathogenic bacterial artificial chromosome
Dewals, Benjamin G ULg; Boudry, Christel; Gillet, Laurent ULg et al

Poster (2006)

Alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 (AlHV-1), carried asymptomatically by wildebeest, causes malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) following cross-species transmission to a variety of susceptible species of the order ... [more ▼]

Alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 (AlHV-1), carried asymptomatically by wildebeest, causes malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) following cross-species transmission to a variety of susceptible species of the order Artiodactyla. The study of MCF pathogenesis has been impeded by an inability to produce recombinant virus, mainly due to the fact that AlHV-1 becomes attenuated during passage in culture. In this study, these difficulties were overcome by cloning the entire AlHV-1 genome as a stable, infectious and pathogenic bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC). A modified loxP-flanked BAC cassette was inserted in one of the two large non-coding regions of the AlHV-1 genome. This insertion allowed the production of an AlHV-1 BAC clone stably maintained in bacteria and able to regenerate virions when transfected into permissive cells. The loxP-flanked BAC cassette was excised from the genome of reconstituted virions by growing them in permissive cells stably expressing Cre recombinase. Importantly, BAC-derived AlHV-1 virions replicated comparably to the virulent (low-passage) AlHV-1 parental strain and induced MCF in rabbits that was indistinguishable from that of the virulent parental strain. The availability of the AlHV-1 BAC is an important advance for the study of MCF that will allow the identification of viral genes involved in MCF pathogenesis, as well as the production of attenuated recombinant candidate vaccines. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailClonage de l’herpèsvirus alcélaphin 1 sous forme d’un chromosome artificiel bactérien infectieux
Dewals, Benjamin G ULg; Boudry, Christel; Markine-Goriaynoff, Nicolas et al

Poster (2005, April)

L’herpèsvirus alcélaphin 1 (AlHV-1) est un Gammaherpesvirinae du genre Rhadinovirus ayant pour hôte naturel le gnou (Connochaetes taurinus). Apathogène pour son hôte naturel, ce virus induit par ailleurs ... [more ▼]

L’herpèsvirus alcélaphin 1 (AlHV-1) est un Gammaherpesvirinae du genre Rhadinovirus ayant pour hôte naturel le gnou (Connochaetes taurinus). Apathogène pour son hôte naturel, ce virus induit par ailleurs une pathologie mortelle lorsqu’il est transmis à un grand nombre d’espèces de ruminants sensibles. Cette pathologie, appelée forme africaine du coryza gangreneux (FACG) est associée à une lymphoprolifération et une destruction des tissus de l’hôte infecté. Pour étudier le rôle de l’AlHV-1 dans la pathogenèse de la FACG, il est nécessaire de pouvoir manipuler le génome viral afin de générer des virus recombinants et révertants pour certains gènes. A ce jour, aucune souche d’AlHV-1 recombinante n’a pu être produite. Cette carence résulte du fait que ce virus est strictement associé aux cellules et qu’il possède la caractéristique de s’atténuer spontanément lors de sa multiplication in vitro. De ce fait, la réalisation de virus mutants se révèle impossible par une approche classique de recombinaison homologue en cellules eucaryotes. Récemment, le développement des technologies de chromosome artificiel bactérien (BAC) a permis de cloner le génome entier de plusieurs gammaherpèsvirus de manière stable en bactérie ainsi que la production rapide de nombreuses souches recombinantes. Dans la présente étude, nous avons cloné le génome entier de la souche C500 de l’AlHV-1 sous forme d’un BAC appelé ci-après BAC-AlHV-1. Les résultats obtenus peuvent se résumer comme suit : (i) le BAC-AlHV-1 permet une propagation stable du génome de l’AlHV-1 en bactérie ; (ii) la transfection du BAC-AlHV-1 en cellules eucaryotes permet de régénérer des particules virales infectieuses ; (iii) la cassette BAC insérée initialement dans le génome de l’AlHV-1 étant flanquée de séquences loxP, la multiplication des virions générés à partir du BAC-AlHV-1 en cellules EBL-Cre (embryonic bovine lung ; exprimant la Cre recombinase) permet l’excision de la cassette BAC ; (iv) enfin, la capacité des virions générés à partir du BAC à induire la FACG en modèle lapin a été démontrée. En conclusion, le clone BAC-AlHV-1 généré dans cette étude va enfin permettre l’étude des rôles des différents gènes de l’AlHV-1 dans la genèse de la FACG. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 47 (16 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailPhylogeographical analysis of bovine herpesvirus 4: demonstration that inter strain recombination events took place after acquisition of the bo17 gene from an ancestor of the african buffalo
Dewals, Benjamin G ULg; Markine-Goriaynoff, Nicolas; de Fays, Kataline et al

Poster (2005, March)

Recently, our phylogenetic study revealed that the Bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV 4) Bo17 gene has been acquired from an ancestor of the African buffalo around 1.5 million years ago, implying that cattle ... [more ▼]

Recently, our phylogenetic study revealed that the Bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV 4) Bo17 gene has been acquired from an ancestor of the African buffalo around 1.5 million years ago, implying that cattle subsequently acquired BoHV 4 by cross species transmission (Markine-Goriaynoff et al., 2003, 77:1784-1792). In the present study, we pursued our investigation on the origin and the evolution of BoHV 4. Firstly, with the goal in mind to further precise the origin of the Bo17 gene, the C2GnT M gene sequence was determined for each subspecies of African buffalo and for three types of Asian buffalo. Phylogenetic analyses of these new sequences further supported our conclusion that the Bo17 gene has been acquired from an ancestor of the African buffalo, possibly of the Syncerus caffer caffer subspecies from East-Africa origin. Secondly, to investigate the phylogeographical relationships among BoHV-4 strains isolated from four different continents, phylogenetic analyses were performed based on six different regions distributed throughout the genome. Analyses of these regions revealed a clear correlation between the phylogenetic relationships among BoHV-4 strains and their geographical origin, leading to the concept of BoHV-4 geographical clades. These analyses also demonstrated that since the acquisition of the Bo17 gene, recombination events occurred at different time in the past between ancestors of actual geographical clades. These recombinations provided an opportunity to learn how after acquisition of the Bo17 gene in Africa around 1.5 million years ago, BoHV-4 has spread to the world to form phylogenetically related geographical clades. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailVaricella-zoster virus IE63 protein represses the basal transcription machinery by disorganizing the pre-initiation complex
Di Valentin, Emmanuel ULg; Bontems, Sébastien ULg; Habran, Lionel ULg et al

in Biological Chemistry (2005), 386(3), 255-267

Using transient transfection assays, regulation properties of varicella-zoster virus (VZV)-encoded IE63 protein were analyzed on several VZV immediate early (ORF4), early (ORF28) and late (ORF67 ... [more ▼]

Using transient transfection assays, regulation properties of varicella-zoster virus (VZV)-encoded IE63 protein were analyzed on several VZV immediate early (ORF4), early (ORF28) and late (ORF67) promoters. IE63 was shown to repress the basal activity of most of the promoters tested in epithelial (Vero) and neuronal (ND7) cells to various extents. Trans -repressing activities were also observed on heterologous viral and cellular promoters. Since a construct carrying only a TATA box sequence and a series of wild-type or mutated interleukin (IL)-8 promoters was also repressed by IE63, the role of upstream regulatory elements was ruled out. Importantly, the basal activity of a TATA-less promoter was not affected by IE63. Using a series of IE63 deletion constructs, amino acids 151-213 were shown to be essential to the transrepressing activity in Vero cells, while in ND7 cells the essential region extended to a much larger carboxy-terminal part of the protein. We also demonstrate that IE63 is capable of disrupting the transcriptional pre-initiation complex and of interacting with several general transcription factors. The central and carboxy-terminal domains of IE63 are important for these effects. Altogether, these results demonstrate that IE63 protein is a transcriptional repressor whose activity is directed towards general transcription factors. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 81 (34 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailEvolution de l’herpèsvirus bovin 4 au cours des 1,5 derniers millions d’années
Dewals, Benjamin G ULg; Markine-Goriaynoff, Nicolas; Gaillard, Claude et al

Conference (2004, April)

L’herpèsvirus bovin 4 (BoHV-4) est un gammaherpèsvirus appartenant au genre Rhadinovirus. Récemment, une étude phylogénique a démontré que le gène Bo17 du BoHV-4 codant pour un homologue fonctionnel de la ... [more ▼]

L’herpèsvirus bovin 4 (BoHV-4) est un gammaherpèsvirus appartenant au genre Rhadinovirus. Récemment, une étude phylogénique a démontré que le gène Bo17 du BoHV-4 codant pour un homologue fonctionnel de la C2GnT-M cellulaire a été acquis d’un ancêtre direct ou indirect du buffle africain (Syncerus caffer) il y a quelques 1,5 millions d’années (Markine-Goriaynoff, N. et al. 2003. The core 2 beta-1,6-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase-mucin encoded by bovine herpesvirus 4 was acquired from an ancestor of the African buffalo. J Virol 77:1784-92). Dans la présente étude, deux objectifs ont été poursuivis. Premièrement, dans le but de préciser l’origine du gène Bo17 du BoHV-4, le gène de la C2GnT-M de diverses sous-espèces de buffles a été séquencé. Les sous-espèces sélectionnées appartiennent aux espèces Syncerus caffer (pour les sous-espèces caffer, aequinoctialis et nanus) et Bubalus bubalis (pour les sous-espèces River, Swamp et Murrah). L’analyse phylogénique des séquences obtenues démontre que le BoHV-4 a acquis son gène Bo17 à partir d’un ancêtre direct de la sous-espèce Syncerus caffer caffer, soit bien après la séparation des Syncerus et des Bubalus. Le second but de cette étude était de déterminer si les souches de BoHV-4 isolées en Afrique à partir de buffle africain forment un groupe phylogénétiquement distinct au sein de l’espèce BoHV-4. Dans ce but, neuf souches représentatives de l’espèce BoHV-4 (dont trois isolées de buffle africain) ont été sequencées au niveau de 5 régions réparties sur l'entièreté du génome viral. L’analyse phylogénique de ces sequences démontre l’existence d’événements de recombinaisons inter-souches survenus récemment au cours de l’évolution. En conclusion, cette étude phylogénique a permis d’étabir que (i) le gène Bo17 du BoHV-4 a été acquis d’un ancêtre direct de la sous-espèce Syncerus caffer caffer de buffle africain, et (ii) que le génome du BoHV-4 a subi par la suite des phénomènes de recombinaisons inter-souches. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 39 (13 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailGlycosyltransferases encoded by viruses.
Markine-Goriaynoff, Nicolas; Gillet, Laurent ULg; Van Etten, James L et al

in Journal of General Virology (The) (2004), 85(Pt 10), 2741-54

Studies of cellular biology in recent decades have highlighted the crucial roles of glycans in numerous important biological processes, raising the concept of glycomics that is now considered as important ... [more ▼]

Studies of cellular biology in recent decades have highlighted the crucial roles of glycans in numerous important biological processes, raising the concept of glycomics that is now considered as important as genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics. For millions of years, viruses have been co-evolving with their hosts. Consequently, during this co-evolution process, viruses have acquired mechanisms to mimic, hijack or sabotage host processes that favour their replication, including mechanisms to modify the glycome. The importance of the glycome in the regulation of host-virus interactions has recently led to a new concept called 'glycovirology'. One fascinating aspect of glycovirology is the study of how viruses affect the glycome. Viruses reach that goal either by regulating expression of host glycosyltransferases or by expressing their own glycosyltransferases. This review describes all virally encoded glycosyltransferases and discusses their established or putative functions. The description of these enzymes illustrates several intriguing aspects of virology and provides further support for the importance of glycomics in biological processes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe core 2 beta-1,6-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase-M encoded by bovine herpesvirus 4 is not essential for virus replication despite contributing to post-translational modifications of structural proteins.
Markine-Goriaynoff, Nicolas; Gillet, Laurent ULg; Karlsen, Odd A et al

in Journal of General Virology (The) (2004), 85(Pt 2), 355-67

The Bo17 gene of bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4) is the only virus gene known to date that encodes a homologue of the cellular core 2 beta-1,6-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase-mucine type (C2GnT-M). Recently ... [more ▼]

The Bo17 gene of bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4) is the only virus gene known to date that encodes a homologue of the cellular core 2 beta-1,6-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase-mucine type (C2GnT-M). Recently, our phylogenetic study revealed that the Bo17 gene has been acquired from an ancestor of the African buffalo around 1.5 million years ago. Despite this recent origin, the Bo17 sequence has spread to fixation in the virus population possibly by natural selection. Supporting the latter hypothesis, it has been shown by our group for the V. test strain that Bo17 is expressed during BoHV-4 replication in vitro, and that Bo17 expression product (pBo17) has all three enzymic activities exhibited by cellular C2GnT-M, i.e. core 2, core 4 and I branching activities. In the present study, firstly it was investigated whether encoding a functional C2GnT-M is a general property of BoHV-4 strains. Analysis of nine representative strains of the BoHV-4 species revealed that all of them express the Bo17 gene and the associated core 2 branching activity during virus replication in vitro. Secondly, in order to investigate the roles of Bo17, its kinetic class of expression was analysed and a deleted recombinant strain was produced. These experiments revealed that Bo17 is expressed as an early gene which is not essential for virus replication in vitro. However, comparison of the structural proteins, produced by the wild-type, the revertant and the deleted viruses, by 2D gels demonstrated that pBo17 contributes to the post-translational modifications of structural proteins. Possible roles of Bo17 in vivo are discussed. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailL'herpèsvirus bovin de type 4 : virus pathogène ou passager?
Thiry, Etienne ULg; Markine-Goriaynoff, Nicolas; Minner, Frédéric et al

in Point Vétérinaire (2000), 31

Bovine herpesvirus type 4 (BHV-4) is a ubiquitous herpesvirus in cattle. It has been isolated from animals showing a wide variety of clinical signs but few of the isolates have proven experimental ... [more ▼]

Bovine herpesvirus type 4 (BHV-4) is a ubiquitous herpesvirus in cattle. It has been isolated from animals showing a wide variety of clinical signs but few of the isolates have proven experimental pathogenicity. Species that are susceptible to BHV-4 include animals other than ruminants, notably cats and, surprisingly, a primate the owl monkey (Aotus trivirgatus). BHV-4 exists as a latent infection in mononuclear cells. In cattle, BHV-4 has been isolated in animals exhibiting ocular and respiratory conditions and it has been found in females with genital tract conditions such as post-partum metritis and vulvovaginitis. There is some epidemiological and experimental evidence that BHV-4 may be a cause of bovine abortion. There is no vaccine available in Europe and prevention is exclusively by hygiene measures. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 50 (4 ULg)