References of "Marichal, Thomas"
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See detailApproaches for analyzing the roles of mast cells and their proteases in vivo.
Galli, Stephen J; Tsai, Mindy; Marichal, Thomas ULg et al

in Advances in Immunology (2015)

The roles of mast cells in health and disease remain incompletely understood. While the evidence that mast cells are critical effector cells in IgE-dependent anaphylaxis and other acute IgE-mediated ... [more ▼]

The roles of mast cells in health and disease remain incompletely understood. While the evidence that mast cells are critical effector cells in IgE-dependent anaphylaxis and other acute IgE-mediated allergic reactions seems unassailable, studies employing various mice deficient in mast cells or mast cell-associated proteases have yielded divergent conclusions about the roles of mast cells or their proteases in certain other immunological responses. Such “controversial” results call into question the relative utility of various older versus newer approaches to ascertain the roles of mast cells and mast cell proteases in vivo. This review discusses how both older and more recent mouse models have been used to investigate the functions of mast cells and their proteases in health and disease. We particularly focus on settings in which divergent conclusions about the importance of mast cells and their proteases have been supported by studies that employed different models of mast cell or mast cell protease deficiency. We think that two major conclusions can be drawn from such findings: (1) no matter which models of mast cell or mast cell protease deficiency one employs, the conclusions drawn from the experiments always should take into account the potential limitations of the models (particularly abnormalities affecting cell types other than mast cells) and (2) even when analyzing a biological response using a single model of mast cell or mast cell protease deficiency, details of experimental design are critical in efforts to define those conditions under which important contributions of mast cells or their proteases can be identified. [less ▲]

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See detailIgE antibodies and FceRI are critical components of protective type 2 immunity against honeybee and russell's viper venom in mice
Starkl, Philipp; Marichal, Thomas ULg; Reber, Laurent L. et al

in Proceedings of the Type 2 Cell Symposium - Brugge (2014, December)

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See detailRecent advances in type 2 immunity: Damage-associated host DNA and Protective Immunoglobulin E.
Marichal, Thomas ULg

Scientific conference (2014, November 17)

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See detailRecent advances in type 2 immunity: Damage-associated host DNA and Protective Immunoglobulin E.
Marichal, Thomas ULg

Scientific conference (2014, November 13)

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See detailNovel role for type E Immunoglobulins: host protection against venoms.
Marichal, Thomas ULg

Scientific conference (2014, October)

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See detailUne reponse allergique pour lutter contre les venins.
Marichal, Thomas ULg; Starkl, Philipp; Metz, Martin et al

in Medecine sciences : M/S (2014), 30(2), 127-30

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See detailIgE antibodies and FceRI are critical mediators of acquired resistance against honeybee and russell's viper venom in mice
Starkl, Philipp; Marichal, Thomas ULg; Reber, Laurent L. et al

in Proceedings of the EAACI Congress 2014 (2014)

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See detailNew concepts in type 2 immunity: Damage-associated signals and Protective IgE
Marichal, Thomas ULg

Scientific conference (2013, November)

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See detailMast cells: potential positive and negative roles in tumor biology.
Marichal, Thomas ULg; Tsai, Mindy; Galli, Stephen J.

in Cancer Immunology Research (2013), 1

Mast cells are immune cells that reside in virtually all vascularized tissues. Upon activation by diverse mechanisms, mast cells can secrete a broad array of biologically active products that either are ... [more ▼]

Mast cells are immune cells that reside in virtually all vascularized tissues. Upon activation by diverse mechanisms, mast cells can secrete a broad array of biologically active products that either are stored in the cytoplasmic granules of the cells (e.g., histamine, heparin, various proteases) or are produced de novo upon cell stimulation (e.g., prostaglandins, leukotrienes, cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors). Mast cells are best known for their effector functions during anaphylaxis and acute IgE-associated allergic reactions, but they also have been implicated in a wide variety of processes that maintain health or contribute to disease. There has been particular interest in the possible roles of mast cells in tumor biology. In vitro studies have shown that mast cells have the potential to influence many aspects of tumor biology, including tumor development, tumor-induced angiogenesis, and tissue remodeling, and the shaping of adaptive immune responses to tumors. Yet, the actual contributions of mast cells to tumor biology in vivo remain controversial. Here, we review some basic features of mast cell biology with a special emphasis on those relevant to their potential roles in tumors. We discuss how using in vivo tumor models in combination with models in which mast cell function can be modulated has implicated mast cells in the regulation of host responses to tumors. Finally, we summarize data from studies of human tumors that suggest either beneficial or detrimental roles for mast cells in tumors. [less ▲]

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See detailKeratinocyte-restricted RabGEF-1 expression is a key regulator of skin homeostasis in vivo
Marichal, Thomas ULg; Reber, Laurent; Tam, See Ying et al

in Proceedings of the 15th ICI (2013, August 27)

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See detailResident lung CD11b+Ly6C- dendritic cells are responsible for allergic airway sensitization to house dust mite in mice
Mesnil, Claire ULg; Sabatel, Catherine ULg; Marichal, Thomas ULg et al

in Proceeding of International Congress of Immunology 2013 (2013)

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See detailPLA2G3 promotes mast cell maturation and function.
Starkl, Philipp; Marichal, Thomas ULg; Galli, Stephen J.

in Nature immunology (2013), 14(6), 527-9

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See detailSelective ablation of mast cells or basophils reduces peanut-induced anaphylaxis in mice.
Reber, Laurent L.; Marichal, Thomas ULg; Mukai, Kaori et al

in The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology (2013), 132(4), 881-81-11

BACKGROUND: Studies with c-kit mutant mast cell (MC)-deficient mice and antibody-mediated depletion of basophils suggest that both MCs and basophils can contribute to peanut-induced anaphylaxis (PIA ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Studies with c-kit mutant mast cell (MC)-deficient mice and antibody-mediated depletion of basophils suggest that both MCs and basophils can contribute to peanut-induced anaphylaxis (PIA). However, interpretation of data obtained by using such approaches is complicated because c-kit mutant mice have several phenotypic abnormalities in addition to MC deficiency and because basophil-depleting antibodies can also react with MCs. OBJECTIVE: We analyzed (1) the changes in the features of PIA in mice after the selective and inducible ablation of MCs or basophils and (2) the possible importance of effector cells other than MCs and basophils in the PIA response. METHODS: Wild-type and various mutant mice were orally sensitized with peanut extract and cholera toxin weekly for 4 weeks and challenged intraperitoneally with peanut extract 2 weeks later. RESULTS: Peanut-challenged, MC-deficient Kit(W-sh/W-sh) mice had reduced immediate hypothermia, as well as a late-phase decrease in body temperature that was abrogated by antibody-mediated depletion of neutrophils. Diphtheria toxin-mediated selective depletion of MCs or basophils in Mcpt5-Cre;iDTR and Mcpt8(DTR) mice, respectively, and treatment of wild-type mice with the basophil-depleting antibody Ba103 significantly reduced peanut-induced hypothermia. Non-c-kit mutant MC- and basophil-deficient Cpa3-Cre;Mcl-1(fl/fl) mice had reduced but still significant responses to peanut. CONCLUSION: Inducible and selective ablation of MCs or basophils in non-c-kit mutant mice can significantly reduce PIA, but partial responses to peanut can still be observed in the virtual absence of both cell types. The neutrophilia in Kit(W-sh/W-sh) mice might influence the responses of these mice in this PIA model. [less ▲]

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See detailA Beneficial Role for Immunoglobulin E in Host Defense against Honeybee Venom.
Marichal, Thomas ULg; Starkl, Philipp; Reber, Laurent L. et al

in Immunity (2013), 39(5), 963-75

Allergies are widely considered to be misdirected type 2 immune responses, in which immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies are produced against any of a broad range of seemingly harmless antigens. However ... [more ▼]

Allergies are widely considered to be misdirected type 2 immune responses, in which immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies are produced against any of a broad range of seemingly harmless antigens. However, components of insect venoms also can sensitize individuals to develop severe IgE-associated allergic reactions, including fatal anaphylaxis, upon subsequent venom exposure. We found that mice injected with amounts of honeybee venom similar to that which could be delivered in one or two stings developed a specific type 2 immune response that increased their resistance to subsequent challenge with potentially lethal amounts of the venom. Our data indicate that IgE antibodies and the high affinity IgE receptor, FcepsilonRI, were essential for such acquired resistance to honeybee venom. The evidence that IgE-dependent immune responses against venom can enhance survival in mice supports the hypothesis that IgE, which also contributes to allergic disorders, has an important function in protection of the host against noxious substances. [less ▲]

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See detailIgE antibodies critically contribute to acquired enhanced resistance to honeybee venom in mice
Marichal, Thomas ULg; Starkl, Philipp; Reber, Laurent L. et al

Conference (2012, September)

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See detailRelease and Innate detection of host cell DNA mediates the adjuvant effects of aluminum salts on adaptive responses
Marichal, Thomas ULg; Ohata, Keichii; Bedoret, Denis et al

in Proceedings of the 1St Winter School Immunology (2012, January)

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See detailL'ADN du soi, allie du systeme immunitaire pour la fonction adjuvante de l'alun
Marichal, Thomas ULg; Bureau, Fabrice ULg; Desmet, Christophe ULg

in Medecine Sciences : M/S (2012), 28(1), 31-3

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See detailResident CD11b(+)Ly6C(-) Lung Dendritic Cells Are Responsible for Allergic Airway Sensitization to House Dust Mite in Mice.
Mesnil, Claire ULg; Sabatel, Catherine ULg; Marichal, Thomas ULg et al

in PLoS ONE (2012), 7(12), 53242

Conventional dendritic cells (DCs) are considered to be the prime initiators of airway allergy. Yet, it remains unclear whether specific DC subsets are preferentially involved in allergic airway ... [more ▼]

Conventional dendritic cells (DCs) are considered to be the prime initiators of airway allergy. Yet, it remains unclear whether specific DC subsets are preferentially involved in allergic airway sensitization. Here, we systematically assessed the respective pro-allergic potential of individually sorted lung DC subsets isolated from house dust mite antigen (HDM)-treated donor mice, following transfer to naive recipients. Transfer of lung CD11c(+)CD11b(+) DCs, but not CD11c(+)CD11b(-)CD103(+) DCs, was sufficient to prime airway allergy. The CD11c(+)CD11b(+) DC subpopulation was composed of CD11c(+)CD11b(+)Ly6C(+) inflammatory monocyte-derived cells, whose numbers increase in the lungs following HDM exposure, and of CD11c(+)CD11b(+)Ly6C(-) DCs, which remain stable. Counterintuitively, only CD11c(+)CD11b(+)Ly6C(-) DCs, and not CD11c(+)CD11b(+)Ly6C(+) DCs, were able to convey antigen to the lymph nodes and induce adaptive T cell responses and subsequent airway allergy. Our results thus support that lung resident non-inflammatory CD11c(+)CD11b(+)Ly6C(-) DCs are the essential inducers of allergic airway sensitization to the common aeroallergen HDM in mice. [less ▲]

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