References of "Margineanu, Ilca"
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See detailPig tissues express a catalytically inefficient 25-kDa thiamine triphosphatase: Insight in the catalytic mechanisms of this enzyme
Szyniarowski, Piotr; Lakaye, Bernard ULg; Czerniecki, Jan ULg et al

in Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - General Subjects (2005), 1725(1), 93-102

Thiamine triphosphate (ThTP) is found in most organisms and may be an intracellular signal molecule produced in response to stress. We have recently cloned the cDNA coding for a highly specific mammalian ... [more ▼]

Thiamine triphosphate (ThTP) is found in most organisms and may be an intracellular signal molecule produced in response to stress. We have recently cloned the cDNA coding for a highly specific mammalian 25-kDa thiamine triphosphatase. The enzyme was active in all mammalian species studied except pig, although the corresponding mRNA was present. In order to determine whether the very low ThTPase activity in pig tissues is due to the absence of the protein or to a lack of catalytic efficiency, we expressed human and pig ThTPase in E. coli as GST fusion proteins. The purified recombinant pig GST-ThTPase was found to be 2-3 orders of magnitude less active than human GST-ThTPase. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we show that, in particular, the change of Glu85 to lysine is responsible for decreased solubility and catalytic activity of the pig enzyme. Immunohistochemical studies revealed a distribution of the protein in pig brain very similar to the one reported in rodent brain. Thus, our results suggest that a 25-kDa protein homologous to hThTPase but practically devoid of enzyme activity is expressed in pig tissues. This raises the possibility that this protein may play a physiological role other than ThTP hydrolysis. [less ▲]

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See detailHuman recombinant thiamine triphosphatase: purification, secondary structure and catalytic properties
Lakaye, Bernard ULg; Makarchikov, Alexander F; Wins, Pierre et al

in International Journal of Biochemistry & Cell Biology (2004), 36(7), 1348-1364

Thiamine triphosphate (ThTP) is found in most living organisms and it may act as a phosphate donor for protein phosphorylation. We have recently cloned the cDNA coding for a highly specific mammalian 25 ... [more ▼]

Thiamine triphosphate (ThTP) is found in most living organisms and it may act as a phosphate donor for protein phosphorylation. We have recently cloned the cDNA coding for a highly specific mammalian 25 kDa thiamine triphosphatase (ThTPase; EC 3.6.1.28). As the enzyme has a high catalytic efficiency and no sequence homology with known phosphohydrolases, it was worth investigating its structure and catalytic properties. For this purpose, we expressed the untagged recombinant human ThTPase (hThTPase) in E. coli, produced the protein on a large scale and purified it to homogeneity. Its kinetic properties were similar to those of the genuine human enzyme, indicating that the recombinant hThTPase is completely functional. Mg2+ ions were required for activity and Ca2+ inhibited the enzyme by competition with Mg2+. With ATP as substrate, the catalytic efficiency was 10(-4)-fold lower than with ThTP, confirming the nearly absolute specificity of the 25 kDa ThTPase for ThTP. The activity was maximum at pH 8.5 and very low at pH 6.0. Zn2+ ions were inhibitory at micromolar concentrations at pH 8.0 but activated at pH 6.0. Kinetic analysis suggests an activator site for Mg2+ and a separate regulatory site for Zn2+. The effects of group-specific reagents such as Woodward's reagent K and diethylpyrocarbonate suggest that at least one carboxyl group in the active site is essential for catalysis, while a positively charged amino group may be involved in substrate binding. The secondary structure of the enzyme, as determined by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, was predominantly beta-sheet and alpha-helix. [less ▲]

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See detailBisindole alkaloids from Strychnos guianensis are effective antagonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in cultured human TE671 cells
Wins, Pierre; Margineanu, Ilca; Penelle, Jacques et al

in Naunyn-Schmiedeberg's Archives of Pharmacology (2003), 367(3), 253-259

Several mono- and bisindole quaternary alkaloids isolated from the stem bark of Strychnos guianensis have recently been shown to be effective blockers of neuromuscular transmission in mice. In this study ... [more ▼]

Several mono- and bisindole quaternary alkaloids isolated from the stem bark of Strychnos guianensis have recently been shown to be effective blockers of neuromuscular transmission in mice. In this study, we used a human clonal cell line (TE671) expressing muscle-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. The agonist carbamylcholine activated a receptor-mediated Rb-86(+) efflux and this activation was antagonized by the indole alkaloids, the most active being bisindole bisquaternary compounds. The most effective antagonist, guiachrysine, had an IC50 around 0.43 muM in the presence of 0.5 mM carbamylcholine, compared to 0.16 muM for d-tubocurarine, the most potent curarizing alkaloid. Guiaflavine and 5',6'-dehydroguiaflavine were slightly less effective. Monoindole compounds were 10 to 100 times less potent than bisindole alkaloids. Kinetic analysis showed that the inhibition of the carbamylcholine-dependent Rb-86(+) efflux by guiaflavine was of mixed competitive and uncompetitive type. The competitive component (K-I = 0.21 muM) is presumably due to binding at the acetylcholine site, while the uncompetitive component (K'(I) = 0.92 muM) may be due to open channel block. [less ▲]

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See detailATP-driven, Na(+)-independent inward Cl- pumping in neuroblastoma cells
Bettendorff, Lucien ULg; Lakaye, Bernard ULg; Margineanu, Ilca et al

in Journal of Neurochemistry (2002), 81(4), 792-801

In immature neurones, the steady-state intracellular Cl- concentration [Cl-](i) is generally higher than expected for passive distribution, and this is believed to be due to Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) co-transport ... [more ▼]

In immature neurones, the steady-state intracellular Cl- concentration [Cl-](i) is generally higher than expected for passive distribution, and this is believed to be due to Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) co-transport. Here, we show that N2a neuroblastoma cells, incubated in HEPES-buffered NaCl medium maintain a [Cl-](i) around 60 mm, two- to threefold higher than expected for passive distribution at a membrane potential of - 49 mV. When the cells were transferred to a Cl(-) -free medium, [Cl-](i) decreased quickly (t(1/2) < 5 min), suggesting a high Cl- permeability. When the intracellular ATP concentration was reduced to less than 1 mm by metabolic inhibitors, the initial rate of (36) Cl- uptake was strongly inhibited (60-65%) while steady-state [Cl-](i) decreased to 24 mm, close to the value predicted from the Nernst equilibrium. Moreover, after reduction of [ATP](i) and [Cl-](i) by rotenone, the subsequent addition of glucose led to a reaccumulation of Cl-, in parallel with ATP recovery. Internal bicarbonate did not affect Cl- pumping, suggesting that Cl-/HCO(3)(-) exchange does not significantly contribute to active transport. Likewise, Na(+) -K(+) -2Cl(-) co-transport also appeared to play a minor role: although mRNA for the NKCC1 form of the co-transporter was detected in N2a cells, neither the initial rate of (36)Cl- uptake nor steady-state [Cl-](i) were appreciably decreased by 10 microm bumetanide or replacement of external Na(+) by choline. These results suggest that a highly active ATP-dependent mechanism, distinct from Na(+) -K(+) -2Cl(-) co-transport, is responsible for most of the inward Cl- pumping in N2a cells. [less ▲]

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See detailParadoxical Sleep Deprivation Increases the Content of Glutamate and Glutamine in Rat Cerebral Cortex
Bettendorff, Lucien ULg; Sallanon-Moulin, M.; Touret, Monique et al

in Sleep (1996), 19(1), 65-71

We investigated the influence of the sleep/waking cycle, the effects of paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD) and of the vigilance-promoting drug modafinil on the amino acid contents of rat brain cortex. No ... [more ▼]

We investigated the influence of the sleep/waking cycle, the effects of paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD) and of the vigilance-promoting drug modafinil on the amino acid contents of rat brain cortex. No significant nycthemeral variations in amino acid levels could be detected. PSD (12-24 hours), using the water tank method, significantly increased the levels of glutamate and glutamine. The increase was still observed after the sleep rebound period. gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels did not change significantly during the instrumental sleep deprivation but increased during the rebound period. Control experiments indicate that the increase in glutamate and glutamine levels is due to PSD rather than to the stress associated with the experimental procedure. The increase in glutamate content cannot arise only from transamination reactions, because the levels of other amino acids (such as aspartate) did not decrease. Modafinil treatment did not significantly modify the brain cortex content of any of the amino acids tested. [less ▲]

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See detailAn Atypical Anion Transporter Functioning at Acid pH in Neuroblastoma Cells
Bettendorff, Lucien ULg; Margineanu, Ilca; Wins, Pierre et al

in Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications (1995), 207(1), 375-381

At pH 7.4, 36Cl- uptake by neuroblastoma cells was Na(+)-independent, saturable and blocked by submicromolar concentrations of DIDS. This suggests that at this pH, Cl- transport is mediated by an ... [more ▼]

At pH 7.4, 36Cl- uptake by neuroblastoma cells was Na(+)-independent, saturable and blocked by submicromolar concentrations of DIDS. This suggests that at this pH, Cl- transport is mediated by an exchanger analogous to erythroid band 3. At pH 6. [less ▲]

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