References of "Mareel, M"
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See detailInvasion and MMP expression profile in desmoid tumours.
Denys, H.; De Wever, O.; Nusgens, Betty ULg et al

in British Journal of Cancer (2004), 90(7), 1443-9

Desmoid tumours are locally invasive soft tissue tumours in which beta-catenin mediated TCF-dependent transcription is activated. The role of soluble factors secreted by the myofibroblastic desmoid tumour ... [more ▼]

Desmoid tumours are locally invasive soft tissue tumours in which beta-catenin mediated TCF-dependent transcription is activated. The role of soluble factors secreted by the myofibroblastic desmoid tumour, which could stimulate tumour invasiveness, was investigated. Using collagen gel invasion assays, the presence of factors stimulating invasion in desmoid conditioned media (CM) could be established. Since matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have been implicated in the process of tumoral invasion, the expression levels of the MMP family members were evaluated. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR was used to determine the expression levels of MMP1, MMP2, MMP3, MMP7, MMP11, MMP12, MMP13, MMP14 and the inhibitors TIMP1, TIMP2 and TIMP3. Besides overexpression of MMP7, a known TCF-dependent target gene, a striking upregulation of the expression levels of MMP1, MMP3, MMP11, MMP12 and MMP13 in desmoid tumours, compared to unaffected fibroblasts from the same patients, was found. Treating the CM of desmoids with a synthetic and a physiologic MMP inhibitor reduced the invasion-stimulating capacity of the desmoid CM by approximately 50%. These results suggest the involvement of soluble factors, released by the desmoid cells, in stimulating invasion and implicate the MMPs as facilitators of invasion. [less ▲]

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See detailUpregulation of MMPs by soluble E-cadherin in human lung tumor cells
Nawrocki-Raby, B.; Gilles, Christine ULg; Polette, M. et al

in International Journal of Cancer = Journal International du Cancer (2003), 105(6), 790-795

Loss of E-cadherin/catenin mediated cell-cell adhesion and overexpression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are largely involved in tumor invasion. It has been recently shown that high levels of a ... [more ▼]

Loss of E-cadherin/catenin mediated cell-cell adhesion and overexpression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are largely involved in tumor invasion. It has been recently shown that high levels of a soluble 80 kDa fragment of E-cadherin, resulting from a cleavage by IVIMPs, are found in serum and in urine from cancer patients. Additionally, this soluble E-cadherin (sE-CAD) promotes cell invasion into chick heart and into collagen type I gels. The aim of our study was to examine the mechanism of sE-CAD-induced cell invasion. Since MMPs play a crucial role in invasion, we looked for induction of MMPs by sE-CAD in noninvasive human lung tumor cells 16HBE. An induction of MMP-2, MMP-9 and MTI-MMP expression was observed both at the mRNA and at the protein level in the presence of sE-CAD (in conditioned medium form or in E-cadherin HAV peptide form). No induction of MMP-I, -3 and -7 or variation of the levels of their inhibitors, TIMP-I and TIMP-2, were detected. The biologic relevance of the sE-CAD-induced MMP upregulation was tested by demonstrating that sE-CAD promotes in vitro cell invasion in a modified Boyden chamber assay. These data provide new insight into mechanisms of tumor invasion by ectodomain shedding of the cell-cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin. (C) 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [less ▲]

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See detailAlteration of Interendothelial Adherens Junctions Following Tumor Cell-Endothelial Cell Interaction in Vitro
Lewalle, J. M.; Bajou, Khalid ULg; Desreux, Joëlle ULg et al

in Experimental Cell Research (1997), 237(2), 347-56

The integrity of the vascular endothelium is mainly dependent upon the organization of interendothelial adherens junctions (AJ). These junctions are formed by the homotypic interaction of a transmembrane ... [more ▼]

The integrity of the vascular endothelium is mainly dependent upon the organization of interendothelial adherens junctions (AJ). These junctions are formed by the homotypic interaction of a transmembrane protein, vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin), which is complexed to an intracellular protein network including alpha-, beta-, and gamma-catenin. Additional proteins such as vinculin and alpha-actinin have been suggested to link the VE-cadherin/catenin complex to the actin-based cytoskeleton. During the process of hematogenous metastasis, circulating tumor cells must disrupt these intercellular junctions in order to extravasate. In the present study, we have investigated the influence of tumor cell-endothelial cell interaction upon interendothelial AJ. We show that human breast adenocarcinoma cells (MCF-7), but not normal human mammary epithelial cells, induce a rapid endothelial cell (EC) dissociation which correlates with the loss of VE-cadherin expression at the site of tumor cell-EC contact and with profound changes in vinculin distribution and organization. This process could not be inhibited by metalloproteinase nor serine protease inhibitors. Immunoprecipitations and Western blot analysis demonstrate that the overall expression of VE-cadherin and vinculin as well as the composition of the VE-cadherin/catenins complex are not affected by tumor cells while the tyrosine phosphorylation status of proteins within the complex is significantly altered. Our data suggest that tumor cells modulate AJ protein distribution and phosphorylation in EC and may, thereby, facilitate EC dissociation. [less ▲]

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See detailEnhancement of Tamoxifen-Induced E-Cadherin Function by Ca2+ Channel Antagonists in Human Breast Cancer Mcf7/6 Cells
Charlier, Corinne ULg; Bruyneel, E.; Lechanteur, Chantal ULg et al

in European Journal of Pharmacology (1996), 317(2-3), 413-6

Despite its intensive use in adjuvant breast cancer therapy for more than 30 years, the exact mechanisms of action of tamoxifen have not yet been fully characterized. Tamoxifen was recently shown to ... [more ▼]

Despite its intensive use in adjuvant breast cancer therapy for more than 30 years, the exact mechanisms of action of tamoxifen have not yet been fully characterized. Tamoxifen was recently shown to restore the E-cadherin function of human breast cancer MCF7/6 cells and to suppress their invasive phenotype. Because tamoxifen interacts with targets implicated in Ca2+ homeostasis, we explored the possibility that the restoration of E-cadherin function in MCF7/6 cells induced by this drug could be affected by Ca2+ modulators. Two different Ca2+ channel antagonists (verapamil and nifedipine) potentiated the effect of tamoxifen on E-cadherin function, as evaluated with a fast cell aggregation assay. These molecules decreased the tamoxifen concentration needed to restore the E-cadherin function from 10(-6) M to 10(-7) M. When incubated with a Ca2+ channel agonist, Bay K8644 (methyl-1,4-dihydro-2,6-dimethyl-3-nitro-4-(2-trifluoro-methylphenyl)- pyridine-5-carboxylate), the effect of tamoxifen on E-cadherin function was completely abolished. These results demonstrate that the restoration of the E-cadherin function induced by tamoxifen depends, at least in part, on a Ca2+ pathway, and support the evidence of an effect of tamoxifen on Ca(2+)-dependent mechanisms. Our data also suggest that Ca2+ channel modulators could make it possible to decrease the dose of tamoxifen administered to patients without reducing the therapeutic effects. [less ▲]

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See detailStromelysin-3 expression promotes tumor take in nude mice
Noël, Agnès ULg; Lefebvre, O.; Maquoi, Erik ULg et al

in Journal of Clinical Investigation (1996), 97

Stromelysin-3 (ST3) is a matrix metalloproteinase expressed in human carcinomas in ways suggesting that it may play a role in tumor progression. To test this possibility, we have performed gene transfer ... [more ▼]

Stromelysin-3 (ST3) is a matrix metalloproteinase expressed in human carcinomas in ways suggesting that it may play a role in tumor progression. To test this possibility, we have performed gene transfer experiments using both anti-sense and sense ST3 expression vectors, and malignant cells either expressing (NIH 3T3 fibroblasts) or not (MCF7 epithelial cells) endogenous ST3. We have compared the ability of parental and transfected cells to cause subcutaneous tumor development in nude mice. 3T3 cells expressing anti-sense ST3 RNA showed reduced tumorigenicity, and MCF7 cells expressing mouse or human ST3 were associated with reduced tumor-free period leading to a significant increased tumor incidence(P<10(-4)). However, once established, the ST3 expressing tumors did not grow faster than those obtained with the parental MCF7 cell line. In addition, tumors obtained after sub-cutaneous injection of ST3-expressing or nonexpressing cells did not exhibit obvious histological differences, and careful examination did not reveal any local invasive tissue areas nor systemic metastases. These in vivo observations were in agreement with those obtained in vitro showing that ST3 expression did not modify proliferative nor invasive properties of transfected cells. Altogether, these results indicate that ST3 expression promotes tumor take in nude mice, presumably by favoring cancer cell survival in a tissue environment initially not permissive for tumor growth. These findings represent the first experimental evidence showing that ST3 can modulate cancer progression. [less ▲]

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See detailTamoxifen and the E-Cadherin/Catenin complex.
Bracke, M.; Van Roy, Frans; Castronovo, Vincenzo ULg et al

in In The Enigma of Tamoxifen. (1996)

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See detailHeterotransplantation of Primary and Established Human Tumour Cells in Nude Mice
Noël, Agnès ULg; Borcy, V.; Bracke, M. et al

in Anticancer Research (1995), 15(1, Jan-Feb), 1-7

Previous successful transplantations of human tumour cells into athymic nude mice have been described when cells were injected with a reconstituted basement membrane (matrigel). We have compared the ... [more ▼]

Previous successful transplantations of human tumour cells into athymic nude mice have been described when cells were injected with a reconstituted basement membrane (matrigel). We have compared the development and the histology of tumours following injection with matrigel or with culture medium of a panel of tumour cells exhibiting different degrees of tumorigenicity. Two cell lines (MCF7 and MCF7/6) required matrigel in order to form tumours. When inoculated with matrigel, all the other cell lines tested [MCF7 gpt, MCF7ras, MCF7(AZ), MCF7(AZ)TD5, MDA-MB 231, HT1080] showed increased tumour take and reduced latency period. Human primary tumours (melanoma, breast and colon cancers) were transplanted successfully into nude mice, in the presence of matrigel. Breast primary tumours or cell lines gave rise to poorly differentiated carcinomas. The other tumours presented histopathological patterns typical of differentiated human cancers. [less ▲]

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See detailTamoxifen activates the cell-cell adhesion function of E-Cadherin in MCF-7/6 human mammary carcinoma cells
Bracke, M.; Charlier, Corinne ULg; Bruyneel, E. et al

Poster (1994)

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See detailEffect of catechins and citrus flavonoids on invasion in vitro.
Bracke, M.; Vyncke, B.; Opdenakker, G. et al

in Clinical & Experimental Metastasis (1991), 9(1), 13-25

Catechins, a group of flavonoid molecules, inhibit invasion of mouse MO4 cells into embryonic chick heart fragments in vitro. The anti-invasive effects can be ranked as follows: (+)-catechin greater than ... [more ▼]

Catechins, a group of flavonoid molecules, inhibit invasion of mouse MO4 cells into embryonic chick heart fragments in vitro. The anti-invasive effects can be ranked as follows: (+)-catechin greater than (-)-epicatechin greater than 3-O-methyl-(+)-catechin greater than 3-O-palmitoyl-(+)-catechin. Most of the catechins are unstable in cell culture media, and their spontaneous rearrangement products tend to bind to extracellular matrix (ECM). Due to these interactions proteases such as tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) are linked to the ECM glycoprotein laminin. This leads to a partial inactivation of the enzyme. Within the group of catechins we found a positive correlation between anti-invasive activity and linking of t-PA to laminin. Citrus flavonoids are also anti-invasive in vitro (tangeretin greater than nobiletin greater than hesperidin = naringin). However, these stable molecules show poor affinity for ECM, and do not link enzymes to laminin. These data suggest that catechins and citrus flavonoids inhibit invasion in vitro by different mechanisms. [less ▲]

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See detailLaminin binding and internalization by human and murine mammary gland cell lines in vitro.
Coopman, P. J.; Nuydens, R.; Leunissen, J. et al

in European Journal of Cell Biology (1991), 56(2), 251-9

We have studied the binding and internalization of Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm mouse sarcoma laminin labeled with colloidal gold (LN-G40) by human and murine mammary gland cell lines. Interactions between the ... [more ▼]

We have studied the binding and internalization of Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm mouse sarcoma laminin labeled with colloidal gold (LN-G40) by human and murine mammary gland cell lines. Interactions between the LN-G40 probe and the cells spread on a glass coverslip were monitored with video-enhanced contrast microscopy (Nanovid). Transmission electron microscopy allowed the quantitation of the LN-G40 probe at various cellular locations. During the first 15 min, a homogeneous binding of LN-G40 probe to the cell surface was observed with all cell lines. This binding did not occur with gold particles that were not conjugated to laminin. Then, the LN-G40 probe began to cluster on the cell surface and was, during the following 20 h, internalized by pits that were not coated. In the cells, the LN-G40 probe sometimes showed saltatory movements along linear tracks. The LN-G40 probe was intracellularly found in vesicles, multivesicular bodies, cisternal structures, and lysosomes, suggesting the degradation of the internalized laminin. However, not all cell surface-bound LN-G40 probe was internalized after 20 h. Differences between the cell lines were quantitative, but no clear correlation could be made between migration of cells on laminin and internalization of laminin. [less ▲]

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See detailArrest of MCF-7 cell migration by laminin in vitro: possible mechanisms.
Coopman, P.; Verhasselt, B.; Bracke, M. et al

in Clinical & Experimental Metastasis (1991), 9(5), 469-84

Laminin, a major basement membrane component, arrested the migration of MCF-7/AZ human breast adenocarcinoma cells that were not invasive in vitro. Migration of invasive MCF-7/6 cells was not affected by ... [more ▼]

Laminin, a major basement membrane component, arrested the migration of MCF-7/AZ human breast adenocarcinoma cells that were not invasive in vitro. Migration of invasive MCF-7/6 cells was not affected by laminin. Both cell types expressed the 67 kD laminin receptor, at both mRNA and protein level, but did not express the alpha 6 subunit of the VLA-6 integrin-type laminin receptor. The presence of YIGSR peptides (100 micrograms/ml), reported to block the interaction between laminin and its 67 kD receptor, did not change the migratory response of MCF-7/AZ or MCF-7/6 cells when meeting laminin lanes. In addition, the migration of these cell types was not affected by the presence of 17-beta-estradiol (10(-6) M) or all-trans retinoic acid (10(-6) M), which were both reported to increase the number of 67 kD receptors. We could therefore not assign an involvement of the 67 kD receptors in migration of MCF-7 cells on laminin, nor did we find evidence that conditioned medium of MCF-7/6 cells contains factors that are able to initiate migration of MCF-7/AZ cells on laminin. [less ▲]

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See detailInteractions of invasive cells with native and modified extracellular matrix in vitro.
Bracke, M.; Castronovo, Vincenzo ULg; De Bruyne, G. et al

in Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology (1988), 233

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See detailFlavonoids inhibit malignant tumor invasion in vitro.
Bracke, M. E.; De Pestel, G.; Castronovo, Vincenzo ULg et al

in Progress in Clinical & Biological Research (1988), 280

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See detailInteractions of invasive cells with native and modified extracellular matrix in vitro.
Bracke, M.; Castronovo, Vincenzo ULg; De Bruyne, G. et al

in In Prodi, G.; Liotta, L. A.; Lollini, P. L. (Eds.) et al Cancer Metastasis : Biological and Biochemical Mechanisms and Clinical Aspects. (1988)

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See detailHuman Anti-Alpha-Galactosyl Igg Reduces the Lung Colonization by Murine Mo4 Cells
Castronovo, Vincenzo ULg; Foidart, Jean-Michel ULg; Li Vecchi, M. et al

in Invasion & Metastasis (1987), 7(6), 325-45

The lung colonization of MO4 cells, a highly malignant murine cell line, is strongly reduced in syngeneic C3H/He mice by a prior incubation with anti-alpha-galactosyl antibody (alpha-Gal Ab), a natural ... [more ▼]

The lung colonization of MO4 cells, a highly malignant murine cell line, is strongly reduced in syngeneic C3H/He mice by a prior incubation with anti-alpha-galactosyl antibody (alpha-Gal Ab), a natural IgG antibody present in high titers in all normal human sera and specifically recognizing Gal alpha(1----3) structures (alpha-D-galactopyranosyl; alpha-D-Galp). The protective effect is due to a binding of alpha-Gal Ab to alpha-D-Galp end groups of MO4 cells, inducing both an increase in their sequestration into the liver and the spleen and a decrease in their sequestration into the lung. The F(ab')2 fragments of this antibody also exhibit a protective effect by inhibiting the homing of MO4 cells into the lung, without modifying their accumulation into the spleen and the liver. Since both the antibody and the alpha-galactosidase pretreatments of MO4 cells block their subsequent attachment to murine laminin in vitro, we suggest that, in this model, the lung colonization may be dependent on the alpha-D-Galp end groups exposed on the surface of MO4 cells. [less ▲]

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See detailAn accumulation of laminin precedes invasion by transformed MO4 cells.
Castronovo, Vincenzo ULg; Bracke, M.; Mareel, M. et al

in Biology and Chemistry of Basement Membranes. (1985)

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