References of "Maquoi, Isabelle"
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See detailComparison of the Surgical Pleth Index (TM) with haemodynamic variables to assess nociception-anti-nociception balance during general anaesthesia
Bonhomme, Vincent ULg; Uutela, K.; Hans, Grégory ULg et al

in British Journal of Anaesthesia (2011), 106(1), 101-11

BACKGROUND: The Surgical Pleth Index (SPI) is proposed as a means to assess the balance between noxious stimulation and the anti-nociceptive effects of anaesthesia. In this study, we compared SPI, mean ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The Surgical Pleth Index (SPI) is proposed as a means to assess the balance between noxious stimulation and the anti-nociceptive effects of anaesthesia. In this study, we compared SPI, mean arterial pressure (MAP), and heart rate (HR) as a means of assessing this balance. METHODS: We studied a standard stimulus [head-holder insertion (HHI)] and varying remifentanil concentrations (CeREMI) in a group of patients undergoing neurosurgery. Patients receiving target-controlled infusions were randomly assigned to one of the three CeREMI (2, 4, or 6 ng m(1)), whereas propofol target was fixed at 3 microg ml(1). Steady state for both targets was achieved before HHI. Intravascular volume status (IVS) was evaluated using respiratory variations in arterial pressure. Prediction probability (Pk) and ordinal regression were used to assess SPI, MAP, and HR performance at indicating CeREMI, and the influence of IVS and chronic treatment for high arterial pressure, as possible confounding factors. RESULTS: The maximum SPI, MAP, or HR observed after HHI correctly indicated CeREMI in one of the two patients [accurate prediction rate (APR)=0.5]. When IVS and chronic treatment for high arterial pressure were taken into account, the APR was 0.6 for each individual variable and 0.8 when all of them predicted the same CeREMI. That increase in APR paralleled an increase in Pk from 0.63 to 0.89. CONCLUSIONS: SPI, HR, and MAP are of comparable value at gauging noxious stimulation-CeREMI balance. Their interpretation is improved by taking account of IVS, treatment for chronic high arterial pressure, and concordance between their predictions. [less ▲]

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See detailPerioperative management of a child with von Willebrand disease undergoing surgical repair of craniosynostosis: looking at unusual targets.
Maquoi, Isabelle ULg; Bonhomme, Vincent ULg; Born, Jacques Daniel et al

in Anesthesia and Analgesia (2009), 109(3), 720-4

We report the successful management of a craniosynostosis repair in a child with severe Type I von Willebrand disease diagnosed during the preoperative assessment and treated by coagulation factor VIII ... [more ▼]

We report the successful management of a craniosynostosis repair in a child with severe Type I von Willebrand disease diagnosed during the preoperative assessment and treated by coagulation factor VIII and ristocetin cofactor. Collaboration among the anesthesiologist, the neurosurgeon, the clinical pathologist, and the pediatric hematologist is important for successful management. [less ▲]

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See detailSafety of Fully Automatic External Defibrillation by Untrained Lay Rescuers in the Presence of a Bystander
Hosmans, Tony; Maquoi, Isabelle ULg; Vogels, Catherine et al

in Resuscitation (2008), 77(2), 216-219

OBJECTIVE: Automated external defibrillators (AEDs) are becoming increasingly available in public places to be used by citizens in case of cardiac arrest. Most AEDs are semi-automatic (SAEDs), but some ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: Automated external defibrillators (AEDs) are becoming increasingly available in public places to be used by citizens in case of cardiac arrest. Most AEDs are semi-automatic (SAEDs), but some are fully automatic (FAEDs) and there is ongoing debate and concern that they may lead to inadvertent shocks to rescuers or bystanders because the timing of the shock is not controlled by the rescuer. We therefore compared the behaviour of untrained citizens using an FAED or an SAED in a simulated cardiac arrest scenario. DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS: One hundred and seventy-six laypeople were randomised to use an FAED or an SAED (Lifepak CR+, Medtronic, Redmond, USA) in a simulated cardiac arrest scenario on a manikin (Ambu, Denmark) where a bystander was touching the victim's upper arm. Each rescuer's performance was recorded on video and analysed afterwards using a modified Cardiff Score. The rescuer or the bystander was considered unsafe if either of them touched the victim during shock delivery. RESULTS: Eleven cases could not be analysed because of technical problems. Fifteen participants violated the protocol making further analysis impossible. Of the remaining 150 participants, 68 used the FAED and 82 used the SAED. The rescuers were safe in 97/150 (65%) cases, without a difference between FAED and SAED. The bystander was safe in 25/68 (37%) cases in the FAED group versus 19/82 (23%) in the SAED group (p=0.07). Combined safety of both rescuer and bystander was observed in 23/68 (34%) cases in the FAED group versus 15/82 (18%) in the SAED group (p=0.03). CONCLUSIONS: Safety was not compromised when untrained lay rescuers used an FAED compared with an SAED. The observation of overall safer behaviour by FAED users in the presence of bystanders may be related to the additional instructions provided by the FAED, and the reduced interaction of the rescuer with the bystander when using the SAED. [less ▲]

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