References of "Maquet, Pierre"
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See detailInfluence of COMT Genotype on Antero-Posterior Cortical Functional Connectivity Underlying Interference Resolution
Jaspar, Mathieu ULg; Manard, Marine ULg; DIDEBERG, Vinciane ULg et al

in Cerebral Cortex (in press)

Genetic variability related to the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene (Val158Met) has received increasing attention as a possible modulator of executive functioning and its neural correlates ... [more ▼]

Genetic variability related to the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene (Val158Met) has received increasing attention as a possible modulator of executive functioning and its neural correlates. However, this attention has generally centred on the prefrontal cortices because of the well-known direct impact of COMT enzyme on these cerebral regions. In this study, we were interested in the modulating effect of COMT genotype on anterior and posterior brain areas underlying interference resolution during a Stroop task. More specifically, we were interested in the functional connectivity between the right inferior frontal operculum (IFop), an area frequently associated with inhibitory efficiency, and posterior brain regions involved in reading/naming processes (the two main non-executive determinants of the Stroop effect). The Stroop task was administered during fMRI scanning to three groups of 15 young adults divided according to their COMT Val158Met genotype [Val/Val (VV), Val/Met (VM) and Met/Met (MM)]. Results indicate greater activity in the right IFop and the left middle temporal gyrus (MTG) in homozygous VV individuals than in Met allele carriers. In addition, the VV group exhibited stronger positive functional connectivity between these two brain regions and stronger negative connectivity between the right IFop and left lingual gyrus. These results confirm the impact of COMT genotype on frontal function. They also strongly suggest that differences in frontal activity influence posterior brain regions related to a non-executive component of the task. Especially, changes in functional connectivity between anterior and posterior brain areas might correspond to compensatory processes for performing the task efficiently when the available dopamine level is low. [less ▲]

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See detailEvolution of Treatment and Investigative Approaches in Sleep Medicine
Ly, Julien; Chellappa, Sarah Laxhmi ULg; MAQUET, Pierre ULg

in Billiard, Michael (Ed.) Sleep Medicine: a comprehensive guide (in press)

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See detailBrain metabolic dysfunction in Capgras delusion during Alzheimer’s disease: a positron emission tomography study
Jedidi, Haroun ULg; Daury, Noémy; Rémi, Capa et al

in American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementias (in press)

Capgras delusion is characterized by the misidentification of people and by the delusional belief that the misidentified persons have been replaced by impostors, generally perceived as persecutors. Since ... [more ▼]

Capgras delusion is characterized by the misidentification of people and by the delusional belief that the misidentified persons have been replaced by impostors, generally perceived as persecutors. Since little is known regarding the neural correlates of Capgras syndrome, the cerebral metabolic pattern of a patient with probable Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Capgras syndrome was compared with those of 24 healthy elderly subjects and 26 AD patients without delusional syndrome. Compared to the healthy and AD groups, the patient had significant hypometabolism in frontal and posterior midline structures. In light of current neural models of face perception, our patient’s Capgras syndrome may be related to impaired recognition of a familiar face, subserved by the posterior cingulate/precuneus cortex, and impaired reflection about personally relevant knowledge related to a face, subserved by the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex. [less ▲]

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See detailSleep and Movement Disorders: Neuroimaging Aspects
Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Desseilles, Martin ULg; Ratti, Pietro-Luca et al

in Chokroverty, Sudhansu; Montagna, Pasquale; Allen, Richard (Eds.) et al Sleep and Movement Disorders (in press)

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See detailHuman cortical excitability depends on time spent awake and circadian phase
Ly, Julien ULg; Gaggioni, Giulia ULg; Chellappa, Sarah Laxhmi ULg et al

Scientific conference (2014, October 04)

At any point in time, human performance results from the interaction of two main factors: a circadian signal varying with the time of the day and the sleep need accrued throughout the preceding waking ... [more ▼]

At any point in time, human performance results from the interaction of two main factors: a circadian signal varying with the time of the day and the sleep need accrued throughout the preceding waking period. But what’s happen at the cortical cerebral level? We used a novel technique coupling transcranial magnetic stimulation with electroencephalography (TMS/EEG) to assess the influence of time spent awake and circadian phasis on human cortical excitability. Twenty-two healthy young men underwent 8 TMS/EEG sessions during a 28 hour sleep deprivation protocole. We found that cortical excitability depends on both time spent awake and circadian phasis. [less ▲]

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See detailAutomatic artifact detection for whole-night polysomnographic sleep recordings
Coppieters't Wallant, Dorothée ULg; Chellappa, Sarah Laxhmi ULg; Gaggioni, Giulia ULg et al

Poster (2014, September 17)

Detecting of bad channels and artifacts for whole-night polysomnographic recordings is very time consuming and tedious. We therefore developed an automatic procedure to automatize this job.

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See detailHuman cortical excitability depends on time awake and circadian phase
Ly, Julien ULg; Chellappa, Sarah Laxhmi ULg; Gaggioni, Giulia ULg et al

Conference (2014, September 17)

At any point in time, human performance results from the interaction of two main factors: a circadian signal varying with the time of the day and the sleep need accrued throughout the preceding waking ... [more ▼]

At any point in time, human performance results from the interaction of two main factors: a circadian signal varying with the time of the day and the sleep need accrued throughout the preceding waking period. But what’s happen at the cortical cerebral level? We used a novel technique coupling transcranial magnetic stimulation with electroencephalography (TMS/EEG) to assess the influence of time spent awake and circadian phasis on human cortical excitability. Twenty-two healthy young men underwent 8 TMS/EEG sessions during a 28 hour sleep deprivation protocole. We found that cortical excitability depends on both time spent awake and circadian phasis. [less ▲]

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See detailHuman cortical excitability depends on time spent awake and circadian phase
Ly, Julien ULg; Chellappa, Sarah Laxhmi ULg; Gaggioni, Giulia ULg et al

Conference (2014, September 17)

At any point in time, human performance results from the interaction of two main factors: a circadian signal varying with the time of the day and the sleep need accrued throughout the preceding waking ... [more ▼]

At any point in time, human performance results from the interaction of two main factors: a circadian signal varying with the time of the day and the sleep need accrued throughout the preceding waking period. But what’s happen at the cortical cerebral level? We used a novel technique coupling transcranial magnetic stimulation with electroencephalography (TMS/EEG) to assess the influence of time spent awake and circadian phasis on human cortical excitability. Twenty-two healthy young men underwent 8 TMS/EEG sessions during a 28 hour sleep deprivation protocole. We found that cortical excitability depends on both time spent awake and circadian phasis. [less ▲]

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See detailAutomatic biorythms description from actigraphic data
González y Viagas, Miguel ULg; Ly, Julien ULg; Gaggioni, Giulia ULg et al

Poster (2014, September)

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See detailCortical excitability dynamics of during sleep deprivation set PVT performance
Borsu, Chloé; Gaggioni, Giulia ULg; Ly, Julien ULg et al

Poster (2014, September)

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See detailThe circadian system sets the temporal organization of basic human neuronal function
Chellappa, Sarah Laxhmi ULg; Ly, Julien; Gaggioni, Giulia ULg et al

Conference (2014, June 16)

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See detailNeuroimaging, cognition, light and circadian rhythms
Gaggioni, Giulia ULg; Maquet, Pierre ULg; Schmidt, Christina et al

in Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience [=FNSYS] (2014)

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See detailCortical excitability dynamics of during sleep deprivation set PVT performance
Borsu, Chloé; Gaggioni, Giulia ULg; Ly, Julien et al

Conference (2014)

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See detailCortical excitability depends on time awake and circadian phase
Ly, Julien; Gaggioni, Giulia ULg; Chellappa, Sarah Laxhmi ULg et al

Conference (2014)

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See detailMemory Reactivation During Rapid Eye Movement (REM) Sleep Promotes Its Generalization and Integration in Cortical Stores
Sterpenich, Virginie; Schmidt, Christina ULg; Albouy, Genevièvre et al

in Sleep (2014), 37(6), 1061-1075

Memory reactivation appears to be a fundamental process in memory consolidation. Here, we tested the influence of memory reactivation during REM sleep on memory performance and brain responses at ... [more ▼]

Memory reactivation appears to be a fundamental process in memory consolidation. Here, we tested the influence of memory reactivation during REM sleep on memory performance and brain responses at retrieval in healthy human participants. Auditory cues were associated with pictures of faces during their encoding. These memory cues delivered during REM sleep enhanced subsequent accurate recollections but also false recognitions. These results suggest that reactivated memories interacted with semantically-related representations, and induced new creative associations, which subsequently reduced the distinction between new and previously encoded exemplars. Cues had no effect if presented during stage 2 sleep, or if they were not associated with faces during encoding. Functional MRI revealed that following exposure to conditioned cues during REM sleep, responses to faces during retrieval were enhanced both in a visual area and in a cortical region of multisensory (auditory-visual) convergence. These results show that reactivating memories during REM sleep enhances cortical responses during retrieval, suggesting the integration of recent memories within cortical circuits, favoring the generalization and schematization of the information. [less ▲]

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See detailModulating effect of COMT genotype on the brain regions underlying proactive control process during inhibition
Jaspar, Mathieu ULg; Genon, Sarah ULg; Muto, Vincenzo ULg et al

in Cortex : A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior (2014), 50

Introduction. Genetic variability related to the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene (Val158Met polymorphism) has received increasing attention as a possible modulator of cognitive control functions ... [more ▼]

Introduction. Genetic variability related to the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene (Val158Met polymorphism) has received increasing attention as a possible modulator of cognitive control functions. Methods. In an event-related fMRI study, a modified version of the Stroop task was administered to three groups of 15 young adults according to their COMT Val158Met genotype [Val/Val (VV), Val/Met (VM) and Met/Met (MM)]. Based on the theory of dual mechanisms of control (Braver, et al., 2007), the Stroop task has been built to induce proactive or reactive control processes according to the task context. Results. Behavioral results did not show any significant group differences for reaction times but Val allele carriers individuals are less accurate in the processing of incongruent items. fMRI results revealed that proactive control is specifically associated with increased activity in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) in carriers of the Met allele, while increased activity is observed in the middle frontal gyrus (MFG) in carriers of the Val allele. Conclusion. These observations, in keeping with a higher cortical dopamine level in MM individuals, support the hypothesis of a COMT Val158Met genotype modulation of the brain regions underlying proactive control, especially in frontal areas as suggested by Braver et al. [less ▲]

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