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See detailUNRAVELLING THE ROLES OF LYSINE ACETYLATION BY ELP3 DURING INNER EAR DEVELOPMENT
Mateo Sanchez, Susana ULg; Delacroix, Laurence ULg; Freeman, Stephen ULg et al

Poster (2015, June 06)

Given the importance of acetylation homeostasis in controlling developmental processes [1-3], we planned to investigate its role in inner ear formation and focused our attention on Elp3 acetyl-transferase ... [more ▼]

Given the importance of acetylation homeostasis in controlling developmental processes [1-3], we planned to investigate its role in inner ear formation and focused our attention on Elp3 acetyl-transferase, a member of the Elongator complex recently implicated in neurogenesis [4]. To determine the role of Elp3 in the inner ear, we first analysed the spatio-temporal pattern of ELp3 mRNA expression and showed that it was expressed in the entire early otocyst at E11.5 and persisted later in the sensory epithelium of the cochlea (the organ of Corti), in the spiral ganglion, in the stria vascularis and in the vestibule. To unravel in vivo functions of Elp3 in the inner ear, we used conditional knock-out mice in which Elp3 gene is deleted from early otocyst (Elp3 cKO). We submitted these mice to a battery of vestibular testing (i.e. stereotyped circling ambulation, head bobbing, retropulsion, and absence of reaching response in the tail-hanging test) and found significant abnormalities. Besides, the auditory brain stem response of Elp3 cKO indicated that these mice are severely deaf. At the cellular level, we did not find any structural abnormalities nor cell patterning defects that could explain deafness or balance dysfunction in Elp3 cKO mice. However, we detected some defaults in the planar orientation of their auditory hair cell bundle. We were also able to demonstrate an increased level of apoptosis in the Elp3 cKO spiral ganglion at E14.5 leading to a reduced number of neurons and fibers innervating the cochlear hair cells as well as a reduced number of their synaptic ribbons at P15. Moreover, the remaining spiral ganglion neurons extend processes showing clearly defects regarding hair cells innervation (misorientation of fibers). In conclusion, our results clearly show a role for Elp3 both in hearing and balance. We plan to go deeper in the mechanisms involved through the identification of the proteins that are targeted for acetylation by Elp3. [less ▲]

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See detailUnravelling Cemip expression and functions in the auditory portion of the inner ear.
Czajkowski, Amandine ULg; Chariot, Alain ULg; Delacroix, Laurence ULg et al

Poster (2015, May 29)

The inner ear is a complex organ composed of the vestibular system – which is the balancing system – and the cochlea – which is the earing system. The cochlea is a coiled shape organ composed of three ... [more ▼]

The inner ear is a complex organ composed of the vestibular system – which is the balancing system – and the cochlea – which is the earing system. The cochlea is a coiled shape organ composed of three main structures: the spiral ligament sitting on top of the stria vascularis, the organ of Corti with sensory hair cells and supporting cells and the spiral ganglion composed of neurons and glial cells. After an auditory stimulus, the sound wave progresses in the scala media filled with endolymph and induces a stimulation of sensory hair cells. These cells then transmit the information to the spiral ganglion neurons connected to them. Of course, the correct ionic homeostasis of endolymph is required for a good sound wave transmission. This homeostatic function is assured by the stria vascularis and the spiral ligament. The alteration of one of the structures mentioned before induces deafness. Currently, numerous genes have been associated to this kind of hearing loss. In the present work, we focus our attention Cemip – also known as KIAA1199 – that has been associated to human hereditary neurosensory deafness. Indeed, three missense mutations consisting in non-synonymous amino acid changes (R187L, R187H and H783Y) have been associated to this form of deafness. Therefore we would like to understand the role of Cemip in the cochlea. For that we have analysed Cemip mRNA pattern of expression by in situ hybridization at different developmental stages on cochlear sections. It seems Cemip mRNA is not present in the auditory portion of the inner ear at early embryonic stage 14 (E14) while it is largely present at E17 in the spiral ganglion, in supporting cells of the organ of Corti and in the spiral ligament. This expression is maintained post-nattily until P7. At P21 the expression is restricted to the spiral lamina - an osseous structure surrounding the spiral ganglion. Our on going work is aimed at revealing the biological role of Cemip in the cochlea in conditional knock-out mice. [less ▲]

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See detailCochlear supporting cell transdifferentiation and integration into hair cell layers by inhibition of ephrin-B2 signalling
Defourny, Jean; Mateo Sanchez, Susana ULg; Schoonaert, Lies et al

in Nature Communications (2015)

In mammals, cochlear sensory hair cells that are responsible for hearing are postmitotic and are not replaced after loss. One of the most promising strategies to regenerate hair cells is to identify and ... [more ▼]

In mammals, cochlear sensory hair cells that are responsible for hearing are postmitotic and are not replaced after loss. One of the most promising strategies to regenerate hair cells is to identify and inhibit the factors preventing the conversion of adjacent non-sensory supporting cells into hair cells. Here we demonstrate that mammalian hair cells can be directly generated from supporting cells by inhibition of ephrin-B2 signalling. Using either ephrin-B2 conditional knockout mice, shRNA-mediated gene silencing or soluble inhibitors, we found that downregulation of ephrin-B2 signalling at embryonic stages results in supporting cell translocation into hair cell layers and subsequent switch in cell identity from supporting cell to hair cell fate. As transdifferentiation is here a result of displacement across boundary, this original finding presents the interest that newly generated hair cells directly integrate either hair cell layer, then would be likely more rapidly able to fit into functional circuitry. [less ▲]

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See detailGeneration of Isogenic Human iPS Cell Line Precisely Corrected by Genome Editing Using the CRISPR/Cas9 System.
Grobarczyk, Benjamin ULg; Franco, Bénédicte ULg; Hanon, Kevin et al

in Stem cell reviews (2015)

Genome engineering and human iPS cells are two powerful technologies, which can be combined to highlight phenotypic differences and identify pathological mechanisms of complex diseases by providing ... [more ▼]

Genome engineering and human iPS cells are two powerful technologies, which can be combined to highlight phenotypic differences and identify pathological mechanisms of complex diseases by providing isogenic cellular material. However, very few data are available regarding precise gene correction in human iPS cells. Here, we describe an optimized stepwise protocol to deliver CRISPR/Cas9 plasmids in human iPS cells. We highlight technical issues especially those associated to human stem cell culture and to the correction of a point mutation to obtain isogenic iPS cell line, without inserting any resistance cassette. Based on a two-steps clonal isolation protocol (mechanical picking followed by enzymatic dissociation), we succeed to select and expand corrected human iPS cell line with a great efficiency (more than 2 % of the sequenced colonies). This protocol can also be used to obtain knock-out cell line from healthy iPS cell line by the NHEJ pathway (with about 15 % efficiency) and reproduce disease phenotype. In addition, we also provide protocols for functional validation tests after every critical step. [less ▲]

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See detailTargeting cholesterol homeostasis to fight hearing loss: a new perspective.
Malgrange, Brigitte ULg; Varela-Nieto, Isabel; de Medina, Philippe et al

in Frontiers in aging neuroscience (2015), 7

Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is a major pathology of the inner ear that affects nearly 600 million people worldwide. Despite intensive researches, this major health problem remains without ... [more ▼]

Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is a major pathology of the inner ear that affects nearly 600 million people worldwide. Despite intensive researches, this major health problem remains without satisfactory solutions. The pathophysiological mechanisms involved in SNHL include oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, inflammation, and ischemia, resulting in synaptic loss, axonal degeneration, and apoptosis of spiral ganglion neurons. The mechanisms associated with SNHL are shared with other neurodegenerative disorders. Cholesterol homeostasis is central to numerous pathologies including neurodegenerative diseases and cholesterol regulates major processes involved in neurons survival and function. The role of cholesterol homeostasis in the physiopathology of inner ear is largely unexplored. In this review, we discuss the findings concerning cholesterol homeostasis in neurodegenerative diseases and whether it should be translated into potential therapeutic strategies for the treatment of SNHL. [less ▲]

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See detailBenfotiamine increases cell proliferation in adult mouse hippocampus
Vignisse, Julie ULg; Caron, Nicolas; Malgrange, Brigitte ULg et al

Poster (2014, May)

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See detailMicroRNA Targeting of CoREST controls polarization of migrating cortical neurons
Volvert; Prévot, Pierre-Paul; Close, Pierre ULg et al

in Cell Reports (2014), 7(4), 1168-83

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See detailUnravelling the roles of lysine acetylation by Elp3 during inner ear development
Mateo Sanchez, Susana ULg; Delacroix, Laurence ULg; Laguesse, Sophie et al

Conference (2014, January 27)

Given the importance of acetylation homeostasis in controlling developmental processes, we planned to investigate its role in inner ear formation and focused our attention on Elp3 acetyl-transferase, a ... [more ▼]

Given the importance of acetylation homeostasis in controlling developmental processes, we planned to investigate its role in inner ear formation and focused our attention on Elp3 acetyl-transferase, a member of the Elongator complex recently implicated in neurogenesis. To determine the role of Elp3 in the inner ear, we first analysed the spatio-temporal pattern of ELp3 mRNA expression and showed that it was expressed in the entire early otocyst at E11.5 and persisted later in the sensory epithelium of the cochlea (the organ of Corti), in the spiral ganglion, in the stria vascularis and in the vestibule. To unravel in vivo functions of Elp3 in the inner ear, we used conditional knock-out mice in which Elp3 gene is deleted from early otocyst (Elp3 cKO). We submitted these mice to a battery of vestibular testing (i.e. stereotyped circling ambulation, head bobbing, retropulsion, and absence of reaching response in the tail-hanging test) and found significant abnormalities. Besides, the auditory brain stem response of Elp3 cKO indicated that these mice are severely deaf. At the cellular level, we did not find any structural abnormalities nor cell patterning defects that could explain deafness or balance dysfunction in Elp3 cKO mice. However, we detected some defaults in the planar orientation of their auditory hair cell bundle. In addition, the length of the kinocilium was significantly reduced both in vestibular and cochlear hair cells from Elp3 cKO mice compared with wild type littermates. We were also able to demonstrate an increased level of apoptosis in the Elp3 cKO spiral ganglion at E14.5 leading to a reduced number of fibers innervating the cochlear hair cells as well as a reduced number of their synaptic ribbons P15. In conclusion, our results clearly show a role for Elp3 both in hearing and balance. We plan to go deeper in the mechanisms involved through the identification of the proteins that are targeted for acetylation by Elp3. [less ▲]

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See detailChapter 7 – Neuronal Circuitries During Inner Ear Development
defourny, jean; Delacroix, Laurence ULg; Malgrange, Brigitte ULg

in Romand, raymond; Varela-Nieto, Isabel (Eds.) Development of auditory and vestibular systems (2014)

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See detailUnravelling the roles of lysine acetyl-transferase activity of Elongator complex during inner ear development
Mateo Sanchez, Susana ULg; Delacroix, Laurence ULg; Laguesse, Sophie et al

Conference (2014)

Given the importance of acetylation homeostasis in controlling developmental processes, we planned to investigate its role in inner ear formation and focused our attention on Elp3 acetyl-transferase, a ... [more ▼]

Given the importance of acetylation homeostasis in controlling developmental processes, we planned to investigate its role in inner ear formation and focused our attention on Elp3 acetyl-transferase, a member of the Elongator complex recently implicated in neurogenesis. To determine the role of Elp3 in the inner ear, we first analysed the spatio-temporal pattern of ELp3 mRNA expression and showed that it was expressed in the entire early otocyst at E11.5 and persisted later in the sensory epithelium of the cochlea (the organ of Corti), in the spiral ganglion, in the stria vascularis and in the vestibule. To unravel in vivo functions of Elp3 in the inner ear, we used conditional knock-out mice in which Elp3 gene is deleted from early otocyst (Elp3 cKO). We submitted these mice to a battery of vestibular testing (i.e. stereotyped circling ambulation, head bobbing, retropulsion, and absence of reaching response in the tail-hanging test) and found significant abnormalities. Besides, the auditory brain stem response of Elp3 cKO indicated that these mice are severely deaf. At the cellular level, we did not find any structural abnormalities nor cell patterning defects that could explain deafness or balance dysfunction in Elp3 cKO mice. However, we detected some defaults in the planar orientation of their auditory hair cell bundle. In addition, the length of the kinocilium was significantly reduced both in vestibular and cochlear hair cells from Elp3 cKO mice compared with wild type littermates. We were also able to demonstrate an increased level of apoptosis in the Elp3 cKO spiral ganglion at E14.5 leading to a reduced number of fibers innervating the cochlear hair cells as well as a reduced number of their synaptic ribbons at P15. To find new potential targets for Elp3, transcriptomes from wild-type, heterozygous and Elp3 cKO mice were analysed by RNA-Seq at E14.5 and E18.5. Surprisingly, we observed that hair cell markers were upregulated in the Elp3 cKO at E14.5, suggesting a premature differentiation in these mice that was confirmed by in situ hybridisation. In conclusion, our results clearly show a role for Elp3 both in hearing and balance. We plan to go deeper in the mechanisms involved through the identification of the proteins that are targeted for acetylation by Elp3. [less ▲]

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See detailForkhead pathway in the control of adult neurogenesis.
Genin, Emmanuelle C.; Caron, Nicolas ULg; Vandenbosch, Renaud ULg et al

in Stem cells (Dayton, Ohio) (2014)

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See detailUnravelling the roles of lysine acetylation by Elp3 during inner ear development
Mateo Sanchez, Susana ULg; Delacroix, Laurence ULg; Laguesse, Sophie et al

Poster (2013, October 18)

Given the importance of acetylation homeostasis in controlling developmental processes, we planned to investigate its role in inner ear formation and focused our attention on Elp3 acetyl-transferase, a ... [more ▼]

Given the importance of acetylation homeostasis in controlling developmental processes, we planned to investigate its role in inner ear formation and focused our attention on Elp3 acetyl-transferase, a member of the Elongator complex recently implicated in neurogenesis. To determine the role of Elp3 in the inner ear, we first analysed the spatio-temporal pattern of ELp3 mRNA expression and showed that it was expressed in the entire early otocyst at E11.5 and persisted later in the sensory epithelium of the cochlea (the organ of Corti), in the spiral ganglion, in the stria vascularis and in the vestibule. To unravel in vivo functions of Elp3 in the inner ear, we used conditional knock-out mice in which Elp3 gene is deleted from early otocyst (Elp3 cKO). We submitted these mice to a battery of vestibular testing (i.e. stereotyped circling ambulation, head bobbing, retropulsion, and absence of reaching response in the tail-hanging test) and found significant abnormalities. Besides, the auditory brain stem response of Elp3 cKO indicated that these mice are severely deaf. At the cellular level, we did not find any structural abnormalities nor cell patterning defects that could explain deafness or balance dysfunction in Elp3 cKO mice. However, we detected some defaults in the planar orientation of their auditory hair cell bundle. In addition, the length of the kinocilium was significantly reduced both in vestibular and cochlear hair cells from Elp3 cKO mice compared with wild type littermates. We were also able to demonstrate an increased level of apoptosis in the Elp3 cKO spiral ganglion at E14.5 leading to a reduced number of fibers innervating the cochlear hair cells as well as a reduced number of their synaptic ribbons P15. In conclusion, our results clearly show a role for Elp3 both in hearing and balance. We plan to go deeper in the mechanisms involved through the identification of the proteins that are targeted for acetylation by Elp3. [less ▲]

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See detailp27(Kip1) as a master regulator of cortical neuron migration.
Godin, Juliette ULg; Thomas, Noémie; Laguesse, Sophie ULg et al

Conference (2013, June)

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See detailUnravelling the roles of lysine acetylation by Elp3 during inner ear development
Mateo Sanchez, Susana ULg; Delacroix, Laurence ULg; Laguesse, Sophie ULg et al

Poster (2013, May 31)

Given the importance of acetylation homeostasis in controlling developmental processes, we planned to investigate its role in inner ear formation and focused our attention on Elp3 acetyl-transferase, a ... [more ▼]

Given the importance of acetylation homeostasis in controlling developmental processes, we planned to investigate its role in inner ear formation and focused our attention on Elp3 acetyl-transferase, a member of the Elongator complex recently implicated in neurogenesis. We first analysed the spatio-temporal pattern of ELp3 mRNA expression and showed that it was expressed in the early otocyst at E11.5 and persisted later in the sensory epithelium of the cochlea, the spiral ganglion, the stria vascularis and the vestibule. To unravel functions of Elp3 in the inner ear, we used conditional knock-out mice in which Elp3 gene is deleted from early otocyst (Elp3 cKO). We submitted these mice to a battery of vestibular testing and found significant abnormalities. Besides, the auditory brain stem response of Elp3 cKO indicated that these mice are severely deaf. At the cellular level, we detected some defaults in the planar orientation of the auditory hair cell bundle. In addition, the length of the kinocilium was significantly reduced both in vestibular and cochlear hair cells from Elp3 cKO mice. We were also able to demonstrate an increased level of apoptosis in the Elp3 cKO spiral ganglion at E14.5 leading to a reduced number of fibers innervating the cochlear hair cells as well as a reduced number of their synaptic ribbons. In conclusion, our results clearly show a role for Elp3 both in hearing and balance. We plan to go deeper in the mechanisms involved through the identification of the proteins that are targeted for acetylation by Elp3. [less ▲]

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See detailUnravelling the roles of lysine acetylation by Elp3 during inner ear development
Mateo Sanchez, Susana ULg; Delacroix, Laurence ULg; Laguesse, Sophie ULg et al

Poster (2013, January 28)

The inner ear is composed of the vestibular system that controls balance, and the cochlea, which is dedicated to hearing. In both parts of the inner ear, sensory epithelia comprise supporting cells ... [more ▼]

The inner ear is composed of the vestibular system that controls balance, and the cochlea, which is dedicated to hearing. In both parts of the inner ear, sensory epithelia comprise supporting cells surrounding the sensory hair cells. These cells bear at their apical surface a staircase-structured bundle, consisting of multiple rows of actin-based stereocilia and a single tubulin-based kinocilium. This hair bundle allows the transduction from mechanical stimuli, initiated by sound or gravitational changes, to electrical signals that will then be transmitted by neurons from the spiral ganglion (innervating hair cells of the cochlea) or the vestibular ganglion. The inner ear organogenesis requires a tightly regulated transcriptional program that can be affected by post-transcriptional and post-translational modifications among which lysine acetylation. Given the importance of acetylation homeostasis in controlling developmental processes, we planned to investigate its role in inner ear formation and focused our attention on Elp3 acetyl-transferase, a member of the Elongator complex recently implicated in neurogenesis. To determine the role of Elp3 in the inner ear, we first determine the spatio-temporal pattern of ELp3 mRNA expression and showed that it was expressed in the entire early otocyst at E11.5 and persisted later in the sensory epithelium of the cochlea (the organ of Corti), in the spiral ganglion, in the stria vascularis and in the vestibule. To unravel in vivo functions of Elp3 in the inner ear, we have generated conditional knock-out mice (Elp3 cKO). We submitted these mice to a battery of vestibular testing (i.e. stereotyped circling ambulation, head bobbing, retropulsion, and absence of reaching response in the tail-hanging test) and found significant abnormalities. Besides, compared to wild-type mice, the auditory brain stem response of Elp3 cKO indicated that these mice are severely deaf. At the cellular level, we did not found any structural abnormalities nor cell patterning impairments that could explain deafness or balance dysfunction in Elp3 cKO mice. However, we detected some defaults in the planar orientation of their auditory hair cell bundle. In addition, the length of the kinocilium was significantly reduced both in vestibular and cochlear hair cells from Elp3 cKO mice compared with wild type littermates. We were also able to demonstrate an increased level of apoptosis in the Elp3 cKO spiral ganglion at E14.5 leading to a reduced number of fibers innervating the cochlear hair cells as well as a reduced number of their synaptic ribbons at P0 and P15. In conclusion, our results clearly showed a role of Elp3 both in hearing and balance. We plan to go deeper in the mechanisms involved through the identification of the proteins acetylated by Elp3. [less ▲]

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See detailGene transfer in inner ear cells: a challenging race
Sacheli, Rosalie ULg; Delacroix, Laurence ULg; Van Den Ackerveken, Priscilla ULg et al

in Gene Therapy (2013), 20

Recent advances in human genomics led to the identification of numerous defective genes causing deafness, which represent novel putative therapeutic targets. Future gene-based treatment of deafness ... [more ▼]

Recent advances in human genomics led to the identification of numerous defective genes causing deafness, which represent novel putative therapeutic targets. Future gene-based treatment of deafness resulting from genetic or acquired sensorineural hearing loss may include strategies ranging from gene therapy to antisense delivery. For successful development of gene therapies, a minimal requirement involves the engineering of appropriate gene carrier systems. Transfer of exogenous genetic material into the mammalian inner ear using viral or non-viral vectors has been characterized over the last decade. The nature of inner ear cells targeted, as well as the transgene expression level and duration, are highly dependent on the vector type, the route of administration and the strength of the promoter driving expression. This review summarizes and discusses recent advances in inner ear gene-transfer technologies aimed at examining gene function or identifying new treatment for inner ear disorders. [less ▲]

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See detailNeuronal Differentiation in the Adult Brain: Cdk6 as the Molecular Regulator
Caron, Nicolas ULg; Genin, Emmanuelle ULg; Vandenbosch, Renaud ULg et al

in Hayat, Eric (Ed.) TUMORS OF THE CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 114 (51 ULg)
See detailp27(Kip1) as a master regulator of cortical neuron migration.
Godin, Juliette ULg; Thomas, Noémie; Laguesse, Sophie ULg et al

Poster (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (0 ULg)