References of "Mahieu, P"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Peer Reviewed
See detailImmunological Status of Competitive Football Players During the Training Season
Bury, Thierry ULg; Marechal, R.; Mahieu, P. et al

in International Journal of Sports Medicine (1998), 19(5), 364-8

We investigated possible immunological changes in 15 professional football players before, during and after the sports season. We studied the leucocyte count as well as different functions such as T ... [more ▼]

We investigated possible immunological changes in 15 professional football players before, during and after the sports season. We studied the leucocyte count as well as different functions such as T-lymphocyte proliferation, NK activity, chemotaxis and phagocytosis of neutrophils. Training and competitions did not produce any change in the total number of leucocytes but increased neutrophil counts and decreased T4 lymphocyte counts. We also observed a slight decrease of T-lymphocyte proliferation and a significant decrease of neutrophil functions. On the other hand, training and competitions did not induce significant changes in the number of NK cells nor in the total NK cytotoxic activity. The different change observed tended to normalize after the sports season. Our results suggest a predominant neutrophil function depression in football players during a training season which could partly explain the susceptibility of elite athletes to infections. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 2 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailTumour necrosis factor (TNF) gene polymorphism influences TNF-alpha production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated whole blood cell culture in healthy humans.
Louis, Edouard ULg; Franchimont, D.; Piron, Anne ULg et al

in Clinical & Experimental Immunology (1998), 113(3), 401-406

TNF-alpha is involved in infectious and immuno-inflammatory diseases. Different individuals may have different capacities for TNF-alpha production. This might determine a predisposition to develop some ... [more ▼]

TNF-alpha is involved in infectious and immuno-inflammatory diseases. Different individuals may have different capacities for TNF-alpha production. This might determine a predisposition to develop some complications or phenotypes of these diseases. The aims of our study were to assess the inter-individual variability of TNF-alpha production and to correlate this variability to a single base pair polymorphism located at position -308 in TNF gene. We studied 62 healthy individuals. TNF-alpha production after LPS stimulation was evaluated using a whole blood cell culture model. The TNF gene polymorphism was studied by an allele-specific polymerase chain reaction. Other cytokines produced in the culture, soluble CD14 concentrations and expression of CD14 on blood cells were also measured. Among the 62 individuals, 57 were successfully genotyped. There were 41 TNF1 homozygotes and 16 TNF1/TNF2 heterozygotes. TNF-alpha production after LPS stimulation of whole blood cell culture was higher among TNF2 carriers than among TNFI homozygotes (929pg/ml (480-1473pg/ml) versus 521 pg/ ml (178-1307 pg/ml); P<0.05). This difference was even more significant after correction of TNF-alpha production for CD14 expression on blood cells. In conclusion, the single base pair polymorphism at position -308 in the TNF gene may influence TNF-alpha production in healthy individuals. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 63 (11 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDecrease in systemic tolerance to fed ovalbumin in indomethacin-treated mice.
Louis, Edouard ULg; Franchimont, D.; Deprez, Manuel ULg et al

in International Archives of Allergy & Immunology (1996), 109(1), 21-6

The oral administration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) to animals induces a quick increase in intestinal permeability and secondary inflammatory lesions of the intestine. The mechanisms ... [more ▼]

The oral administration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) to animals induces a quick increase in intestinal permeability and secondary inflammatory lesions of the intestine. The mechanisms leading to the inflammatory lesions are hypothetical. The increased intestinal permeability could allow a greater mucosal and systemic penetration of fed antigens and bacterial products leading to an abnormal mucosal and systemic immune and inflammatory response toward these materials. We examined the effect of oral dosing with indomethacin on ovalbumin serum levels and the systemic immune response to ovalbumin in mice fed with ovalbumin. The ovalbumin serum level was higher in indomethacin-treated mice and the increase was proportional to the dose of indomethacin. It was associated with epithelial and subepithelial lesions. Moreover, the systemic humoral and, to a lesser extent, the cellular tolerance were partially abrogated in the treated mice. These findings suggest that the oral administration of indomethacin in mice induces an increased passage of fed antigen through the intestinal epithelium associated with a decrease in systemic tolerance to this antigen. The reason for this decrease remains unclear. Besides a disequilibrium between systemic and mucosal immune responses, a loss of integrity of the intestinal epithelial cells and a direct immunomodulating effect of indomethacin may also be involved. This decrease in systemic tolerance to luminal antigen could be involved in the development of NSAID enteropathy. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 40 (13 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSystemic Immune Response after Rectocolonic Administration of Ovalbumin in Mice
Louis, Edouard ULg; Franchimont, D.; Lamproye, Anne ULg et al

in International Archives of Allergy & Immunology (1995), 108(1), 19-23

The aim of our study was to determine the effect of a rectocolonic preimmunization with ovalbumin on the systemic immune response induced by a subsequent subcutaneous injection of this antigen in Balb/c ... [more ▼]

The aim of our study was to determine the effect of a rectocolonic preimmunization with ovalbumin on the systemic immune response induced by a subsequent subcutaneous injection of this antigen in Balb/c mice. One rectocolonic, but not intragastric, administration of 25 mg of ovalbumin induced a detectable increase in serum anti-ovalbumin antibody level. The level reached was however much lower than after subcutaneous injection. Both intragastric and rectocolonic immunization with ovalbumin induced specific systemic cellular tolerance. However, after rectocolonic, but not intragastric, preimmunization there was no systemic humoral tolerance to this antigen. These differences in systemic immune responses after rectocolonic or intragastric administration of ovalbumin could be due to different stimulation of the systemic immune system or to differences between the colonic and small bowel mucosal immune system, which remain to be elucidated. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSoluble Interleukin-2 Receptor in Crohn's Disease. Assessment of Disease Activity and Prediction of Relapse
Louis, Edouard ULg; Belaiche, Jacques ULg; Van Kemseke, Catherine ULg et al

in Digestive Diseases & Sciences (1995), 40(8), 1750-6

In Crohn's disease, the activity of the disease is difficult to evaluate and the evolution of the disease is difficult to predict. The soluble interleukin-2 receptor serum level has been reported to ... [more ▼]

In Crohn's disease, the activity of the disease is difficult to evaluate and the evolution of the disease is difficult to predict. The soluble interleukin-2 receptor serum level has been reported to correlate with clinical activity of the disease and with mucosal immune activation. We compared serum soluble interleukin-2 receptor to classical inflammatory markers and other immune parameters in the assessment of clinical disease activity and prediction of relapse in patients with Crohn's disease. Soluble interleukin-2 receptor serum levels correlated well with the Crohn's disease activity index, and multivariate analysis showed that this correlation was independent of the other inflammatory and immune markers. The correlation was not greater, However, than that between some inflammatory markers, such as ESR, and Crohn's disease activity index. Longitudinal follow-up showed that a high soluble interleukin-2 receptor serum level was highly predictive of relapse. Multivariate analysis showed that the soluble interleukin-2 recepteur serum level was complementary to other inflammatory and clinical markers in the prediction of relapse of disease. We conclude that soluble interleukin-2 receptor is of use in monitoring Crohn's disease, particularly in prediction of relapse. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (3 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailAnticorps anticytoplasme des polynucléaires neutrophiles (ANCA) dans les maladies inflammatoires du tube digestif
Lamproye, Anne ULg; Belaiche, Jacques ULg; Louis, Edouard ULg et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (1994), 57(2, Mar-Apr), 171-6

Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies have recently been demonstrated in sera of patients with inflammatory bowel disease. We are reporting here our experience among 94 patients with Crohn's disease and ... [more ▼]

Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies have recently been demonstrated in sera of patients with inflammatory bowel disease. We are reporting here our experience among 94 patients with Crohn's disease and 25 with ulcerative colitis. The indirect immunofluorescence assay with alcohol fixed neutrophils has been used. The presence of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies was significantly associated to the ulcerative colitis 61% VS 17% (p < 0.001). The fluorescence had a perinuclear pattern among all but one suffering from ulcerative colitis. Among the patients suffering from ulcerative colitis there was no relationship between the presence of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies and the activity or the localisation of the disease. Among the 9 patients operated for their ulcerative colitis, 4 were ANCA positive and remained so after proctocolectomy. The existence of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies is useful for the diagnosis of some unclassifiable colitis. Their presence may be used as an argument in favour of some disturbances of the immunoregulation of the disease. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 171 (0 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailLes syndromes hémorragiques pulmonaires diffus: approches clinique et diagnostique
Bury, Thierry ULg; Corhay, Jean-Louis ULg; Kotolenko, S. et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (1992), 47(11), 554-9

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (5 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailGalactose Alpha 1-3 Galactose and Anti-Alpha Galactose Antibody in Normal and Pathological Pregnancies
Christiane, Y.; Aghayan, M.; Emonard, H. et al

in Placenta (1992), 13(5, Sep-Oct), 475-87

The galactose alpha 1-3 galactose (Gal alpha 1-3 Gal) residue is a carbohydrate widely distributed in many non-human mammals. Since Gal alpha 1-3 Gal residues are described on the cell surface of tumor ... [more ▼]

The galactose alpha 1-3 galactose (Gal alpha 1-3 Gal) residue is a carbohydrate widely distributed in many non-human mammals. Since Gal alpha 1-3 Gal residues are described on the cell surface of tumor cells, we have examined the possibility of their expression on human trophoblastic cells at different stages of placental implantation and in various pregnancy-associated conditions. Using immunohistochemical methods, Gal alpha 1-3 Gal was demonstrated on interstitial and vascular trophoblast during pregnancy. For villous trophoblast, the staining disappeared in second trimester pregnancies. The density of staining for Gal alpha 1-3 Gal was increased in highly invasive trophoblast (mole and choriocarcinoma) and decreased in poorly invasive specimens (spontaneous abortion, XO monosomia). No cells displaying Gal alpha 1-3 Gal at their surface were identified in some segments of spiral arteries from pre-eclamptic women. The anti-Gal antibody titer increased in the first trimester of pregnancy and in the sera of pre-eclamptic and eclamptic patients. These findings suggest that Gal alpha 1-3 Gal residues could be considered as markers for trophoblast invasive capacity and that the binding of maternal anti-Gal antibodies to the trophoblast could contribute to limit trophoblastic invasion and thus participate to the immunological control of implantation. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEvidence that the interaction between circulating IgA and fibronectin is a normal process enhanced in primary IgA nephropathy.
Davin, J. C.; Li Vecchi, M.; Nagy, J. et al

in Journal of Clinical Immunology (1991), 11(2), 78-94

A solid-phase ELISA was set up to measure the direct binding capacity (BC) of different, commercially available, purified human IgA preparations to plates coated with human fibronectin (FN). It was found ... [more ▼]

A solid-phase ELISA was set up to measure the direct binding capacity (BC) of different, commercially available, purified human IgA preparations to plates coated with human fibronectin (FN). It was found that secretory, polymeric, and, to a much lesser extent, monomeric IgA exhibited elevated FN-BC as compared to their BC to plates coated with bovine serum albumin. This binding was specific since not observed with human IgG or IgM antibodies. In addition, we noted that this interaction was dose dependent, Ca2+ dependent, saturable, and not covalent, was inhibited by soluble FN, but not by a prior incubation of FN-coated plates with anti-human fibronectin antibodies, and appeared to involve on the dimeric FN other structures than its heparin-binding, collagen-binding, or C1q-binding domains. Similar experiments conducted with normal plasma indicated that plasma IgA, but not plasma IgG or IgM, was also capable of significant binding to FN-coated plates. In contrast, serum IgA did not significantly bind to those plates under otherwise identical experimental conditions. Thus, the coagulation process induces a strong decrease in the FN-BC of circulating IgA, which implies the necessity of using plasma rather than serum to study such interactions. The apparent molecular weight of plasma IgA interacting with FN-coated plates ranged between 450 and 900 kd, and its major binding characteristics were quite similar to those observed with purified polymeric IgA. The FN-BC of plasma IgA was then measured by the same ELISA in 30 patients with primary IgA nephropathy (IgAN) and in 23 healthy controls. The mean FN-BC of plasma IgA was significantly higher in patients than in normal controls. This enhancement was due mainly to the augmentation in the concentration of circulating "macromolecular" IgA and was significantly correlated with the plasma levels of IgA-FN complexes. However, the pathogenetic role of these findings was probably not determinant since similar observations were made in alcoholic liver cirrhosis without urinary abnormalities and since the FN-BC of plasma IgA or the plasma levels of IgA-FN complexes were not correlated with the various biological parameters of evolutivity of primary IgAN. In conclusion, these studies suggest that the ability of polymeric IgA to directly bind to FN is involved in the formation of circulating IgA-FN complexes and that this normal binding process, although enhanced in IgAN, is probably not responsible for kidney injury, at least in the patients studied. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (2 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailPossible Role of Human Natural Anti-Gal Antibodies in the Natural Antitumor Defense System
Castronovo, Vincenzo ULg; Colin, Claude ULg; Parent, B. et al

in Journal of the National Cancer Institute (1989), 81(3), 212-6

Expression of Gal alpha 1-3Gal cell surface residues has been correlated with the metastatic potential of murine tumor cells. We report that Gal alpha 1-3Gal residues are expressed at the cell surface of ... [more ▼]

Expression of Gal alpha 1-3Gal cell surface residues has been correlated with the metastatic potential of murine tumor cells. We report that Gal alpha 1-3Gal residues are expressed at the cell surface of malignant human cancer cells, including four cell lines and 50% of the malignant breast specimens obtained by aspiration biopsy. In contrast, all benign breast biopsies and normal cells were Gal alpha 1-3Gal negative. Affinity-purified anti-alpha-galactosyl IgG (anti-Gal) antibody, which specifically recognizes Gal alpha 1-3Gal residues, significantly inhibited cell attachment in two in vitro assays thought to indicate tumor cell extravasation of the circulatory system during the metastatic process: attachment to perfused human umbilical vein endothelium, and attachment to isolated laminin. Since anti-Gal antibody is a natural component of all human sera, we propose that it may be part of the natural antitumor defense system in humans. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailReactivity of human anti-alpha-galactosyl IgG antibody with alpha(1-->3)-linked galactosyl epitopes exposed on basement membranes and on glomerular epithelial cells: an in vitro and in vivo study in the mouse.
Vecchi, M. L.; Davin, J. C.; Castronovo, Vincenzo ULg et al

in Clinical & Experimental Immunology (1989), 78(2), 271-7

Anti-alpha-galactosyl antibody (a-Gal Ab) is a human natural antibody belonging to the IgG class, found in high titres in all normal sera regardless of blood group, and specifically recognizing alpha (1 ... [more ▼]

Anti-alpha-galactosyl antibody (a-Gal Ab) is a human natural antibody belonging to the IgG class, found in high titres in all normal sera regardless of blood group, and specifically recognizing alpha (1-->3)-linked galactosyl residues. We have observed by radioimmunoassay, ELISA, passive haemagglutination and immunofluorescence blocking studies that affinity-purified a-Gal Ab reacted with mouse laminin, but not with the other mouse basement membrane proteins tested; it was able to fix complement in vitro. When injected intravenously into mice, the a-Gal Ab was found to mainly accumulate in kidneys, liver, spleen and lungs. No acute respiratory distress syndrome was observed shortly after the i.v. injection of 100 or 200 microg of antibodies. These doses of a-Gal Ab were also unable to induce acute glomerular injury. However, in primary cultures, the a-Gal Ab (100 or 200 microg per ml of medium) was shown to impair the attachment of mouse glomerular epithelial cells to mouse laminin and to elicit complement-dependent cell damage. The data indicate that the a-Gal Ab can interact in vitro and/or in vivo with alpha (1-->3)-linked galactosyl residues exposed on murine laminin or on murine cultured glomerular epithelial cells. Although this antibody fails to be pathogenic when administered at low doses in the intact animal, similar doses can alter some metabolic properties of these cells in vitro. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (1 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailDerivation of an Algorithm for Optimal Initial Cyclosporine Immunotherapy in Kidney Transplantation
Meurisse, Michel ULg; Albert, Adelin ULg; Defraigne, Jean-Olivier ULg et al

in Transplantation Proceedings (1988), 20(5 Suppl 6), 45-51

Detailed reference viewed: 6 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailStimulation of platelet lipoxygenase during hemodialysis
Foidart, J. B.; Davin, J. C.; Malaise, Michel ULg et al

in Kidney International. Supplement (1988), 24

Detailed reference viewed: 4 (1 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailPerfusion of Human Umbilical Veins. A New Approach to Study the Interactions of Circulating Malignant Cells with Vascular Wall and Their Modulations
Castronovo, Vincenzo ULg; Parent, B.; Foidart, Jean-Michel ULg et al

in Invasion & Metastasis (1988), 8(6), 332-50

Interactions of malignant or non-malignant human and rodent cells with the vascular wall were studied using perfused human umbilical cord veins. The integrity of perfused endothelium was confirmed by ... [more ▼]

Interactions of malignant or non-malignant human and rodent cells with the vascular wall were studied using perfused human umbilical cord veins. The integrity of perfused endothelium was confirmed by morphological and functional criteria. Highly malignant cells in vivo adhered to the endothelial cells, as shown by scanning electron microscopy. The specific attachment of radiolabelled malignant cells to the whole vein was already maximal within 30-60 min and remained stable for perfusion flow rates ranging between 10 and 60 ml/min. It increased proportionally to the number of cells infused and could be modulated by human platelets, human fibronectin and rabbit anti-laminin antibodies. In contrast, the binding of human or rodent non-malignant cells in vivo, of human red blood cells and of human platelets to the endothelial cells was negligible under similar experimental conditions. This perfusion system therefore represents a new model for elucidating some mechanisms involved in tumour cell arrest in vivo. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 77 (19 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailInfluence de la grossesse sur certaines maladies auto-immunes
Mahieu, P.; Malaise, Michel ULg; Hoyoux, C. et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (1988), 43(22), 727-736

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAnti-alpha-galactosyl antibodies and immune complexes in children with Henoch-Schonlein purpura or IgA nephropathy
Davin, J. C.; Malaise, Michel ULg; Foidart, J. et al

in Kidney International (1987), 31(5), 1132-1139

Episodes of hematuria in IgA nephropathy or Henoch-Schonlein purpura are frequently associated with microbial infections. Some of those infectious agents bear alpha-galactosyl residues on their cell ... [more ▼]

Episodes of hematuria in IgA nephropathy or Henoch-Schonlein purpura are frequently associated with microbial infections. Some of those infectious agents bear alpha-galactosyl residues on their cell surface. These observations prompted us to determine, by passive hemagglutination, the titers of natural anti-galactosyl antibodies in the serum of children presenting with Henoch-Schonlein purpura (10 cases) or IgA nephropathy (7 cases). Antibody titers of normal subjects (103 cases), children with a pharyngitis of unknown etiology (7 cases), and children exhibiting mesangial IgA deposits but no hematuria at the time of testing (6 cases) ranged from 1:20 to 1:80. Elevated titers (greater than 1:80) were observed in nine of 11 patients with mesangial IgA deposits and micro- or macroscopic hematuria, in nine of 19 children with other evolutive glomerular diseases (5 cases of acute glomerulonephritis and 4 cases of minimal change disease), and in most subjects presenting with a M. pneumoniae (4/5 cases) or a E. Coli (4/5 cases) infection. Antibody titers decreased after incubation of normal and pathological sera with D-galactose (10 mM) or with alpha-galactosyl-glucoside (10 mM), but not with D-glucose (10 mM). The anti-alpha-galactosyl antibodies purified, by affinity chromatography, from sera of 10 normal children, 10 pathological controls and four children with mesangial IgA deposits without hematuria belonged to IgG class. In contrast, both IgG and IgA anti-alpha-galactosyl antibodies were detected in six of six patients with mesangial IgA deposits and hematuria. The IgA content of immune complexes detected in those patients decreased after incubation of sera with alpha-galactosyl-glucoside, but not with D-glucose. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 4 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailElevated anti-alpha-galactosyl antibody titres. A marker of progression in autoimmune thyroid disorders and in endocrine ophthalmopathy?
Etienne-Decerf, J.; Malaise, Michel ULg; Mahieu, P. et al

in Acta Endocrinologica (1987), 115(1), 67-74

The titres of anti-alpha-galactosyl antibodies were measured by passive haemagglutination in 50 control subjects and in 128 patients presenting with various thyroid disorders. Titres of control subjects ... [more ▼]

The titres of anti-alpha-galactosyl antibodies were measured by passive haemagglutination in 50 control subjects and in 128 patients presenting with various thyroid disorders. Titres of control subjects ranged from 1/10 to 1/80, regardless of age and blood group. Elevated titres (greater than 1/80) were constantly noted in 6/6 patients with progressive exophthalmos, in 5/5 patients with untreated Graves' disease, and in 11/12 patients with progressive nontoxic goitre. By contrast, the titres were within the normal range in primary myxoedema (17 patients) and in residual exophthalmos (11 patients), whereas they were only erratically increased in 1/31 patients with treated or cured Graves' disease and in 5/36 patients with nonprogressive nontoxic goitre. Finally, elevated titres were also found in 3/7 patients presenting with autoimmune thyroiditis. No correlations could be established between elevated titres and the thyrotropin binding inhibiting immunoglobulin activity, the antithyroglobulin antibody titres or the antimicrosomal antibody titres. As in the control subjects, the anti-alpha-galactosyl antibodies mainly belonged to the IgG class. Affinity purified anti-alpha-galactosyl antibodies were capable of binding to trypsinized human and porcine thyroid cells in culture, as shown by indirect immunofluorescence. On the other hand, they were not able to react with untreated thyroid cells. The data show that the measurement of anti-alpha-galactosyl antibody titres could represent an easy and useful tool to determine whether an autoimmune thyroid disorder is in progression. Besides, they suggest that some of the antigenic determinants implicated in the enhanced production of anti-alpha-galactosyl antibodies are present, but normally hidden, within the cell surface of thyroid cells. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 3 (0 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailLe syndrome hémolytique et urémique de l'enfant
SEGHAYE, Marie-Christine ULg; DAVIN, J. C.; DUCHENNE, C. et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (1987), 42

Detailed reference viewed: 3 (1 ULg)
See detailFibronectin: Adjunctive therapy in sepsis
Damas, Pierre ULg; Mahieu, P.; Adam, Aurore ULg

in Update in Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine (1987)

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (1 ULg)