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See detailSpecific members of the predominant gut microbiota predict pouchitis following colectomy and IPAA in UC.
Machiels, Kathleen; Sabino, Joao; Vandermosten, Leen et al

in Gut (2015)

OBJECTIVE: Pouchitis is the most common complication after colectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA) for UC and the risk is the highest within the 1st year after surgery. The pathogenesis is not ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: Pouchitis is the most common complication after colectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA) for UC and the risk is the highest within the 1st year after surgery. The pathogenesis is not completely understood but clinical response to antibiotics suggests a role for gut microbiota. We hypothesised that the risk for pouchitis can be predicted based on the faecal microbial composition before colectomy. DESIGN: Faecal samples from 21 patients with UC undergoing IPAA were prospectively collected before colectomy and at predefined clinical visits at 1 month, 3 months, 6 months and 12 months after IPAA. The predominant microbiota was analysed using community profiling with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis followed by quantitative real-time PCR validation. RESULTS: Cluster analysis before colectomy distinguished patients with pouchitis from those with normal pouch during the 1st year of follow-up. In patients developing pouchitis, an increase of Ruminococcus gnavus (p<0.001), Bacteroides vulgatus (p=0.043), Clostridium perfringens (p=0.011) and a reduction of two Lachnospiraceae genera (Blautia (p=0.04), Roseburia (p=0.008)) was observed. A score combining these five bacterial risk factors was calculated and presence of at least two risk factors showed a sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 63.6%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Presence of R. gnavus, B. vulgatus and C. perfringens and absence of Blautia and Roseburia in faecal samples of patients with UC before surgery is associated with a higher risk of pouchitis after IPAA. Our findings suggest new predictive and therapeutic strategies in patients undergoing colectomy with IPAA. [less ▲]

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See detailGenome-Wide Copy Number Variation Scan Identifies Complement Component C4 as Novel Susceptibility Gene for Crohn's Disease.
Cleynen, Isabelle; Konings, Peter; Robberecht, Caroline et al

in Inflammatory bowel diseases (2015)

BACKGROUND: The genetic component of Crohn's disease (CD) is well known, with 140 susceptibility loci identified so far. In addition to single nucleotide polymorphisms typically studied in genome-wide ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The genetic component of Crohn's disease (CD) is well known, with 140 susceptibility loci identified so far. In addition to single nucleotide polymorphisms typically studied in genome-wide scans, copy number variation is responsible for a large proportion of human genetic variation. METHODS: We performed a genome-wide search for copy number variants associated with CD using array comparative genomic hybridization. One of the found regions was validated independently through real-time PCR. Serum levels of the found gene were measured in patients and control subjects. RESULTS: We found copy number differences for the C4S and C4L gene variants of complement component C4 in the central major histocompatibility complex region on chromosome 6p21. Specifically, we saw that CD patients tend to have lower C4L and higher C4S copies than control subjects (P = 5.00 x 10 and P = 9.11 x 10), which was independent of known associated classical HLA I and II alleles (P = 7.68 x 10 and P = 6.29 x 10). Although C4 serum levels were not different between patients and control subjects, the relationship between C4 copy number and serum level was different for patients and control subjects with higher copy numbers leading to higher serum concentrations in control subjects, compared with CD patients (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: C4 is part of the classical activation pathway of the complement system, which is important for (auto)immunity. Low C4L or high C4S copy number, and corresponding effects on C4 serum level, could lead to an exaggerated response against infections, possibly leading to (auto)immune disease. [less ▲]

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See detailNeutrophil gelatinase B-associated lipocalin and matrix metalloproteinase-9 complex as a surrogate serum marker of mucosal healing in ulcerative colitis.
de Bruyn, Magali; Arijs, Ingrid; Wollants, Willem-Jan et al

in Inflammatory bowel diseases (2014), 20(7), 1198-207

BACKGROUND: The current standard for the assessment of mucosal healing after therapy in inflammatory bowel diseases is endoscopy. However, a high need exists for noninvasive, accurate surrogate markers ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The current standard for the assessment of mucosal healing after therapy in inflammatory bowel diseases is endoscopy. However, a high need exists for noninvasive, accurate surrogate markers. METHODS: In 2 independent cohorts, levels of serum neutrophil gelatinase B-associated lipocalin and matrix metalloproteinase-9 complex (NGAL-MMP-9) from patients with active ulcerative colitis (UC) before and after first treatment with infliximab and from healthy controls (HC) were determined with zymography and sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The response to infliximab was defined as complete mucosal healing (Mayo endoscopic subscore 0-1) at control endoscopy. Data were analyzed with SPSS, and P values <0.05 were considered significant. RESULTS: In cohort 1 (n = 66; median age, 30 yr; 38% female), serum NGAL-MMP-9 levels significantly increased at baseline in UC patients versus HC (103.8 versus 42.4 ng/mL; P < 0.0001), whereas 55% of the patients had normal C-reactive protein levels. NGAL-MMP-9 levels significantly decreased after therapy in UC responders (from 116.3 ng/mL to 32.0 ng/mL; P < 0.0001) and in nonresponders (from 94.7 ng/mL to 54.1 ng/mL; P = 0.047). In cohort 2 (n = 132; median age, 39 yr; 53% female), NGAL-MMP-9 levels increased at baseline in active UC patients versus HC (86.5 versus 60.4 ng/mL; P = 0.10), whereas 45% of the patients had normal C-reactive protein levels. NGAL-MMP-9 levels significantly decreased after therapy in responders (from 87.5 ng/mL to 16.3 ng/mL; P < 0.0001) but not in nonresponders (from 82.7 ng/mL to 57.8 ng/mL; P = 0.19). After pooling the data, a cutoff value of 97.7 ng/mL for NGAL-MMP-9 complex was determined to predict complete mucosal healing with high specificity (91%). CONCLUSIONS: Serum NGAL-MMP-9 is suggested as a new surrogate marker for the assessment of mucosal healing in UC patients treated with infliximab. [less ▲]

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See detailMucosal gene expression of cell adhesion molecules, chemokines, and chemokine receptors in patients with inflammatory bowel disease before and after infliximab treatment.
Arijs, Ingrid; De Hertogh, Gert; Machiels, Kathleen et al

in American Journal of Gastroenterology (2011), 106(4), 748-61

OBJECTIVES: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by a continuous influx of leukocytes into the gut wall. This migration is regulated by cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), and selective ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by a continuous influx of leukocytes into the gut wall. This migration is regulated by cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), and selective antimigration therapies have been developed. This study investigated the effect of infliximab therapy on the mucosal gene expression of CAMs in IBD. METHODS: Mucosal gene expression of 69 leukocyte/endothelial CAMs and E-cadherin was investigated in 61 IBD patients before and after first infliximab infusion and in 12 normal controls, using Affymetrix gene expression microarrays. Quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR (qRT-PCR), immunohistochemistry, and western blotting were used to confirm the microarray data. RESULTS: When compared with control colons, the colonic mucosal gene expression of most leukocyte/endothelial adhesion molecules was upregulated and E-cadherin gene expression was downregulated in active colonic IBD (IBDc) before therapy, with no significant colonic gene expression differences between ulcerative colitis and colonic Crohn's disease. Infliximab therapy restored the upregulations of leukocyte CAMs in IBDc responders to infliximab that paralleled the disappearance of the inflammatory cells from the colonic lamina propria. Also, the colonic gene expression of endothelial CAMs and of most chemokines/chemokine receptors returned to normal after therapy in IBDc responders, and only CCL20 and CXCL1-2 expression remained increased after therapy in IBDc responders vs. control colons. When compared with control ileums, the ileal gene expression of MADCAM1, THY1, PECAM1, CCL28, CXCL1, -2, -5, -6, and -11, and IL8 was increased and CD58 expression was decreased in active ileal Crohn's disease (CDi) before therapy, and none of the genes remained dysregulated after therapy in CDi responders vs. control ileums. This microarray study identified a number of interesting targets for antiadhesion therapy including PECAM1, IL8, and CCL20, besides the currently studied alpha4beta7 integrin-MADCAM1 axis. CONCLUSIONS: Our data demonstrate that many leukocyte/endothelial CAMs and chemokines/chemokine receptors are upregulated in inflamed IBD mucosa. Controlling the inflammation with infliximab restores most of these dysregulations in IBD. These results show that at least part of the mechanism of anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha therapy goes through downregulation of certain adhesion molecules. [less ▲]

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