References of "MONARD, Josée"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA More Than 20% Increase in Deceased-Donor Organ Procurement and Transplantation Activity After the Use of Donation After Circulatory Death.
Le Dinh, H.; MONARD, Josée ULg; DELBOUILLE, Marie-Hélène ULg et al

in Transplantation proceedings (2014), 46(1), 9-13

BACKGROUND: Organ procurement and transplant activity from controlled donation after circulatory death (DCD) was evaluated over an 11-year period to determine whether this program influenced the ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Organ procurement and transplant activity from controlled donation after circulatory death (DCD) was evaluated over an 11-year period to determine whether this program influenced the transplant and donation after brain death (DBD) activities. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Deceased donor (DD) procurement and transplant data were prospectively collected in a local database for retrospective review. RESULTS: There was an increasing trend in the potential and actual DCD numbers over time. DCD accounted for 21.9% of the DD pool over 11 years, representing 23.7% and 24.2% of the DD kidney and liver pool, respectively. The DBD retrieval and transplant activity increased during the same time period. Mean conversion rate turning potential into effective DCD donors was 47.3%. Mean DCD donor age was 54.6 years (range, 3-83). Donors >/=60 years old made up 44.1% of the DCD pool. Among referred donors, reasons for nondonation were medical contraindications (33.7%) and family refusals (19%). Mean organ yield per DCD donor was 2.3 organs. Mean total procurement warm ischemia time was 19.5 minutes (range, 6-39). In 2012, 17 DCD and 37 DBD procurements were performed in the Liege region, which has slightly >1 million inhabitants. CONCLUSIONS: This DCD program implementation enlarged the DD pool and did not compromise the development of DBD programs. The potential DCD pool might be underused and seems to be a valuable organ donor source. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (15 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDONATION AFTER CIRCULATORY DEATH LIVER TRANSPLANTATION: IS DONOR AGE AN ISSUE?
DETRY, Olivier ULg; Ledinh, Heu; HONORE, Pierre ULg et al

in Transplant International (2013, December), 26(s2), 112-228

Background: Donation after circulatory death (DCD) donors > 55 years are usually not considered suitable for liver transplantation (LT). At our institute, age is not an absolute exclusion criterion to ... [more ▼]

Background: Donation after circulatory death (DCD) donors > 55 years are usually not considered suitable for liver transplantation (LT). At our institute, age is not an absolute exclusion criterion to refuse DCD liver grafts. We retrospectively compared the transplant outcome of patients receiving older DCD liver grafts to the younger ones. Methods: 70 DCD liver transplants have been performed from 2003 to 2012, which includes 32 liver grafts from younger donors <55y (group A), 20 between 56 and 69 years (group B), and 18 from older donors ≥70 years (group C). The three groups were compared in terms of donor and recipient demographics, procurement and transplantation conditions, peak laboratory values during the first post-transplant week and results at one and three years. Results are expressed as median IQR. Results: No difference other than age in donor and recipient characteristics as well as procurement conditions was noted between both groups. Median donor age of the group A was 44 (38-45) years, in group B 62 (60-64) years and 73 (71-75) in group C. Median primary warm ischemia time (WIT) were 20 (17-22), 21 (19-25) and 19 (16-23) min, respectively (NS). Median cold ischemia time (CIT) was 236 (229-294), 245 (227-290) and 210 (195-277) min, respectively (NS). Peak AST (UI/ml) was 1162 (1072-3971), 1416 (1006-2752), and 1067 (902-4037), respectively (NS). There was no primary nonfunction and one patient needed retransplantation for artery thrombosis. Biliary complications occurred similarly in both groups, without graft loss secondary to ischemic cholangiopathy. Graft and patient survivals were not different at one and three years. Conclusion: This study shows comparable results between DCD liver transplants from younger and older donors. Therefore donor age >55 years should not be a contraindication to DCD liver transplantation if other donor risk factors (such as WIT, CIT) are minimized. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 32 (6 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLiège experience in donation after cardiac death liver transplantation: 2003-2011
Le Dinh, Hieu ULg; DELWAIDE, Jean ULg; MONARD, Josée ULg et al

in Acta Chirurgica Belgica (2012, May), 112(3), 6811

Objectives: Results of DCD-LT at the University Hospital of Liège were evaluated from 2003 to 2011. Methods: Medical records of 56 DCD liver recipients were retrospectively reviewed with regard to patient ... [more ▼]

Objectives: Results of DCD-LT at the University Hospital of Liège were evaluated from 2003 to 2011. Methods: Medical records of 56 DCD liver recipients were retrospectively reviewed with regard to patient and graft survivals and biliary complications. Mean follow-up was 26.4 months. Mean donor age was 56.3±14.5 years (25 - 83). Donor causes of death were due to anoxia (51.8%), stroke (32.1%) and head trauma (14.3%). Mean WIT, CIT and suture time were 20.5±7.1min (10 – 39), 265.6±85.1min (105 – 576), and 40.8±7.8 min (25 – 61), respectively. 95% of liver grafts were locally shared. HTK was the most commonly used perfusion solution (86%). Mean recipient age was 56.6±10.5 years (29 – 73). Indications for LT included ESLD (53.6%) and HCC (46.6%). Mean MELD score at transplant was 15.6±6.1points (6 – 40). Results: No primary non-function grafts. Mean peak serum AST and bilirubin levels were 2520±3621UI/L and 50.2±49.2mg/L, respectively. Eight patients (14.3%) developed biliary complications. No intra-hepatic bile duct strictures or re-transplantation. Global patient and graft survival was 92.6% at 3 months, 92.6% at 1 year, 73.8% at 3 years and 60% at 5 years. Death-censored patient and graft survival at the corresponding time points was 92.6%, 92.6%, 87.7% and 87.7%. Thirteen liver grafts were lost during follow-up exclusively due to recipient deaths. The rate of HCC recurrence was 33.3%. Conclusions: Controlled DCD donors are a valuable source of transplantable liver grafts. Primary results are encouraging and apparently as good as those from brain-dead donation LT essentially due to short WIT and CIT. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 55 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailResults of kidney transplantation from controlled donors after cardio-circulatory death: a single center experience
Le Dinh, Hieu ULg; WEEKERS, Laurent ULg; BONVOISIN, Catherine ULg et al

in Acta Chirurgica Belgica (2012, May), 112(3), 667

Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine results of kidney transplantation (KT) from controlled donation after cardio-circulatory death (DCD). Primary end-points were graft and patient survival ... [more ▼]

Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine results of kidney transplantation (KT) from controlled donation after cardio-circulatory death (DCD). Primary end-points were graft and patient survival, and post-transplant complications. The influence of delayed graft function (DGF) on graft survival and DGF risk factors were analyzed as secondary end-points. Methods: This is a retrospective mono-center review of a consecutive series of 80 DCD-KT performed at the University Hospital of Sart Tilman, University of Liège, between Jan 2005 and Dec 2011. Mean patient follow-up was 28.5 months. Results: Overall graft survival was 93.7%, 89.5%, 85% and 81.3% at 3 months, 1 year, 3 and 5 years, respectively. Death-censored graft survival at the corresponding time points was 93.7%, 93.7%, 90.8% and 90.8%. Main cause of graft loss was patient’s death with a functioning graft. No primary non-function grafts were encountered. Renal graft function was suboptimal at hospital discharge, but nearly normalized at 3 months. DGF was observed in 36% of all DCD-KT. DGF significantly increased post-operative length of hospitalization, but had no deleterious impact on graft function or survival. Donor body mass index (BMI) ≥30 kg/m2, recipient BMI ≥30 kg/m2 and pre-transplant dialysis duration significantly increased the risk of DGF in a multivariate logistic regression analysis (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Despite a higher rate of DGF, controlled DCD-KT offers a valuable contribution to the pool of deceased donor kidney grafts, with comparable mid-term results to those procured after brain death. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 38 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDelayed graft function does not harm the future of donation-after- cardiac-death kidney transplants
LeDinh, H; WEEKERS, Laurent ULg; BONVOISIN, Catherine ULg et al

Conference (2012, March 29)

Introduction: Delayed graft function (DGF) occurs more frequently in kidney transplants from donation after cardiac death (DCD) than from donation after brain death (DBD). We investigated the effect of ... [more ▼]

Introduction: Delayed graft function (DGF) occurs more frequently in kidney transplants from donation after cardiac death (DCD) than from donation after brain death (DBD). We investigated the effect of DGF on post-transplant outcomes in controlled DCD kidney grafts. Patients and Methods: This single-center retrospective study recruited 80 controlled DCD kidney allo- grafts which have been performed at the University Hospital of Sart Tilman, University of Liège, from Jan 2005 to Dec 2011. Results: Mean patient follow-up was 28.5 months. No primary non-function grafts were encountered. DGF rate was 36%. Overall graft survivals between groups with and without DGF were 92.4% and 95.1% at 1 year, 92.4% and 91.7% at 3 years, and 84.7% and 91.7% at 5 years (p=ns), respectively. Patients with and without DGF had the same survival rates at the corresponding time points (92.4% and 97.1%, 92.4% and 93.7%, and 84.7% and 93.7%, p=ns, respectively). Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was significantly lower in DGF group compared to non-DGF group at hospital discharge (29 vs 42 ml/min, p=0.001) and up to 1 year post-transplant (46 vs 53 ml/min, p=0.045), but the differ- ence disappeared afterwards (50 vs 48 ml/min at 3 years, and 54 vs 53 ml/min at 5 years, p=ns). DGF did not increase the risk of acute rejection or surgical complications. 29.6% of recipients with DGF de- veloped acute rejection (biopsy-proven rejection and clinically suspected rejection) compared with 29.2% of recipients without DGF (p=ns). The rate of all surgical complications was 33.3% and 25% in recipients with and without DGF (p=ns). However, DGF prolonged significantly the length of hospitaliza- tion in DGF than non-DGF group (18.9 vs 13 days, p=0.000). Donor BMI 􏰤 30 kg/m2􏰁􏰀􏰚􏰌􏰈􏰏􏰥􏰏􏰌􏰝􏰣􏰀􏰕􏰉􏰂􏰀􏰤 30 kg/m2 and pre-transplant dialysis duration increased the risk of DGF in a multivariate logistic regression analysis. Conclusions: Apart from longer hospital stay, DGF had no deleterious impact on the future of DCD kidney allografts. Comparable graft and patient survival, renal function, rejection rate and surgical com- plications were observed between groups with and without DGF. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailResults of kidney transplantation from controlled donors after cardio-circulatory death: a single center experience.
Ledinh, H.; WEEKERS, Laurent ULg; BONVOISIN, Catherine ULg et al

in Transplant International (2012), 25

The aim of this study was to determine results of kidney transplantation (KT) from controlled donation after cardio-circulatory death (DCD). Primary end-points were graft and patient survival, and post ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to determine results of kidney transplantation (KT) from controlled donation after cardio-circulatory death (DCD). Primary end-points were graft and patient survival, and post-transplant complications. The influence of delayed graft function (DGF) on graft survival and DGF risk factors were analyzed as secondary end-points. This is a retrospective mono-center review of a consecutive series of 59 DCD-KT performed between 2005 and 2010. Overall graft survival was 96.6%, 94.6%, and 90.7% at 3 months, 1 and 3 years, respectively. Main cause of graft loss was patient's death with a functioning graft. No primary nonfunction grafts. Renal graft function was suboptimal at hospital discharge, but nearly normalized at 3 months. DGF was observed in 45.6% of all DCD-KT. DGF significantly increased postoperative length of hospitalization, but had no deleterious impact on graft function or survival. Donor body mass index >/=30 was the only donor factor that was found to significantly increase the risk of DGF (P < 0.05). Despite a higher rate of DGF, controlled DCD-KT offers a valuable contribution to the pool of deceased donor kidney grafts, with comparable mid-term results to those procured after brain death. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 61 (27 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDelayed graft function does not harm the future of donation-after-cardiac death in kidney transplantation.
Le Dinh, Hieu; WEEKERS, Laurent ULg; BONVOISIN, Catherine ULg et al

in Transplantation Proceedings (2012), 44(9), 2795-802

INTRODUCTION: Delayed graft function (DGF) occurs more frequently in kidney transplants from donation after cardiac death (DCD) than from donation after brain death (DBD). We investigated the effect of ... [more ▼]

INTRODUCTION: Delayed graft function (DGF) occurs more frequently in kidney transplants from donation after cardiac death (DCD) than from donation after brain death (DBD). We investigated the effect of DGF on posttransplantation outcomes among grafts from controlled DCD kidneys. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This single-center retrospective study recruited 80 controlled DCD kidneys transplanted from January 2005 to December 2011. Mean patient follow-up was 28.5 months. RESULTS: There were no primary nonfunction grafts; the DGF rate was 35.5%. Overall graft survival rates between groups with versus without DGF were 92.4% and 95.2% at 1 year, 92.4% and 87.1% at 3 years, and 84.7% and 87.1% at 5 years, respectively (P = not significant (NS)). Patients with versus without DGF showed the same survival rates at the corresponding time 92.4% vs 97.2%, 92.4% vs 93.9%, and 84.7% vs 93.9% (P = NS). Estimated glomerular filtration rate was significantly lower in the DGF compared with the non-DGF group at hospital discharge (29 vs 42 mL/min; P = .00) and at 6 months posttransplantation (46 vs 52 mL/min; P = .04), but the difference disappeared thereafter: 47 vs 52 mL/min at 1 year, 50 vs 48 mL/min at 3 years, and 54 vs 53 mL/min at 5 years (P = NS). DGF did not increase the risk of an acute rejection episode (29.6% vs 30.6%; P = NS) or rate of surgical complications (33.3% vs 26.5%; P = NS). However, DGF prolonged significantly the length of hospitalization in the DGF versus the non- DGF group (18.9 vs 13 days; P = .00). Donor body mass index (BMI) >/= 30 kg/m(2), recipient BMI >/=30 kg/m(2), and pretransplantation dialysis duration increased the risk of DGF upon multivariate logistic regression analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Apart from the longer hospital stay, DGF had no deleterious impact on the future of kidney allografts from controlled DCD, which showed comparable graft and patient survivals, renal function, rejection rates, and surgical complications as a group without DGF. Therefore, DGF should no longer be considered to be a medical barrier to the use of kidney grafts from controlled DCD. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (1 ULg)
Full Text
See detailDCD liver transplantation: is donor age an issue?
DETRY, Olivier ULg; le dinh, Hieu; Honoré, Pierre ULg et al

Conference (2011, March 24)

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDonation after Cardiac Death increases the number of liver grafts for liver transplantation
Ledinh, H.; HANS, Marie-France ULg; MONARD, Josée ULg et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2011, March), 74(1), 10

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEnd of life care in the operating room for non-heart-beating donors: organization at the University Hospital of Liege.
JORIS, Jean ULg; KABA, Abdourahmane ULg; LAUWICK, Séverine ULg et al

in Transplantation Proceedings (2011), 43(9), 3441-4

Non-heart-beating (NHB) organ donation has become an alternative source to increase organ supply for transplantation. A NHB donation program was implemented in our institution in 2002. As in many ... [more ▼]

Non-heart-beating (NHB) organ donation has become an alternative source to increase organ supply for transplantation. A NHB donation program was implemented in our institution in 2002. As in many institutions the end of life care of the NHB donor (NHBD) is terminated in the operating room (OR) to reduce warm ischemia time. Herein we have described the organization of end of life care for these patients in our institution, including the problems addressed, the solution proposed, and the remaining issues. Emphasis is given to our protocol elaborated with the different contributors of the chain of the NHB donation program. This protocol specifies the information mandatory in the medical records, the end of life care procedure, the determination of death, and the issue of organ preservation measures before NHBD death. The persisting malaise associated with NHB donation reported by OR nurses is finally documented using an anonymous questionnaire. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 89 (24 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailContribution of donors after cardiac death to the deceased donor pool: 2002 to 2009 university of liege experience.
Ledinh, H.; Meurisse, Nicolas ULg; Delbouille, Michèle ULg et al

in Transplantation Proceedings (2010), 42(10), 4369-72

OBJECTIVE: In this study, we have evaluated the organ procurement and transplantation activity from donors after cardiac death (DCD) at our institution over an 8-year period. Our aim was to determine ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: In this study, we have evaluated the organ procurement and transplantation activity from donors after cardiac death (DCD) at our institution over an 8-year period. Our aim was to determine whether this program influenced transplantation programs, or donation after brain death (DBD) activity. METHODS: We prospectively collected our procurement and transplantation statistics in a database for retrospective review. RESULTS: We observed an increasing trend in potential and actual DCD number. The mean conversion rate turning potential into effective donors was 58.1%. DCD accounted for 16.6% of the deceased donor (DD) pool over 8 years. The mean age for effective DCD donors was 53.9 years (range, 3-79). Among the effective donors, 63.3% (n = 31) came from the transplant center and 36.7% (n = 18) were referred from collaborative hospitals. All donors were Maastricht III category. The number of kidney and liver transplants using DCD sources tended to increase. DCD kidney transplants represented 10.8% of the DD kidney pool and DCD liver transplants made up 13.9% of the DD liver pool over 8 years. The DBD program activity increased in the same time period. In 2009, 17 DCD and 33 DBD procurements were performed in a region with a little >1 million inhabitants. CONCLUSION: The establishment of a DCD program in our institution enlarged the donor pool and did not compromise the development of the DBD program. In our experience, DCD are a valuable source for abdominal organ transplantation. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (15 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDonation after Cardiac Death In Liver Transplantation :is donor age an issue?
Detry, Olivier ULg; De Roover, Arnaud ULg; Squifflet, Jean-Paul ULg et al

in Acta Chirurgica Belgica (2010, April), 110

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (7 ULg)
Full Text
See detailLes prélèvements à coeur arrêté: une source d'organes trop souvent oubliée?
Detry, Olivier ULg; De Roover, Arnaud ULg; Damas, Pierre ULg et al

in Hospitals.be (2010), 8(1), 7-12

La transplantation est aujourd’hui victime de son succès. Les procédures de prélèvement à coeur arrêté se doivent de respecter les règles d’éthique et les dispositions légales en la matière. La pénurie ... [more ▼]

La transplantation est aujourd’hui victime de son succès. Les procédures de prélèvement à coeur arrêté se doivent de respecter les règles d’éthique et les dispositions légales en la matière. La pénurie relative d’organes sera partiellement comblée lorsqu’elles seront appliquées dans une majorité d'hôpitaux du pays. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (13 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailLa transplantation pancréatique isolée : le retour à l'activité physqiue
Malaise, Jacques; Dabe, Alain; Hermant, Christophe et al

Conference (2009, October 10)

Detailed reference viewed: 79 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLiver transplant donation after cardiac death : experience at the University of Liège
Detry, Olivier ULg; Seydel, Benoît ULg; Delbouille, Marie-Hélène ULg et al

in Transplantation Proceedings (2009), 41(2), 582-4

Aim: Donation after cardiac death (DCD) has been proposed to partly overcome the organ donor shortage. In liver transplantation, the additional warm ischemia linked to DCD procurement may promote higher ... [more ▼]

Aim: Donation after cardiac death (DCD) has been proposed to partly overcome the organ donor shortage. In liver transplantation, the additional warm ischemia linked to DCD procurement may promote higher rate of primary non-function and ischemic type biliary lesions. In this study we reviewed the results of DCD liver transplantation at the University of Liège. Patients and Methods: From 2003 to 2007, 13 controlled DCD liver transplantations were consecutively performed. The records of all donors and recipients were retrospectively reviewed, particularly evaluating the outcome and the occurrence of biliary complications. Mean follow-up was 25 months. Results: Mean donor age was 51 years and their mean intensive care stay was 5.4 days. Mean time between ventilation arrest and cardiac arrest was 9.3 min. Mean time between cardiac arrest and arterial flush was 7.7 min. No touch period was 2 to 5 min. Mean graft cold ischemia was 295 min and mean suture warm ischemia was 38 min. Postoperatively there was no primary non-function. Mean peak transaminase was 2,546 UI/ml. Patient and graft survival was 100% at one year. Two patients (15%) developed graft main bile duct stenosis and underwent endoscopic management. No patient developed symptomatic intrahepatic bile duct strictures or needed retransplantation in the follow-up. Conclusions: The experience of the transplantation department of the University of Liege confirms that controlled DCD donors may be a valuable source of transplantable liver grafts, in case of short procurement warm ischemia and short transplant cold ischemia. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 138 (22 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailResults of liver transplantation from controlled donation after cardiac death (DCD) donors: a single center experience
Detry, Olivier ULg; Seydel, Benoît ULg; Veys, C. et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2009, January), 72(1), 25

Detailed reference viewed: 61 (17 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFulminant Hepatic Failure Induced by Venlafaxine and Trazodone Therapy: A Case Report.
Detry, Olivier ULg; Delwaide, Jean ULg; De Roover, Arnaud ULg et al

in Transplantation Proceedings (2009), 41(8), 3435-3436

Although acute hepatitis may be a side effect of many medications, most cases are reversible after treatment interruption, and fulminant hepatic failure (FHF) is rare. Venlafaxine and trazodone are 2 ... [more ▼]

Although acute hepatitis may be a side effect of many medications, most cases are reversible after treatment interruption, and fulminant hepatic failure (FHF) is rare. Venlafaxine and trazodone are 2 popular antidepressant agents. Alteration of liver enzyme levels has been reported as a side effect of these drugs at normal doses. Herein we have reported the case of a 48-year-old woman without any previous history of liver disease, who developed fulminant liver failure after 4 months of venlafaxine and trazodone therapy. She required liver transplantation, a procedure that was successful with full patient recovery. The first 5 years of follow-up were uneventful. This case documented that venlafaxine and trazodone at normal doses can produce severe liver toxicity. Liver tests should be monitored regularly in patients who receive this therapy. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 92 (16 ULg)