References of "Lutts, Stanley"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDifferential cadmium and zinc distribution in relation to their physiological impact in the leaves of the accumulating Zygophyllum fabago L
LEFÈVRE, Isabelle; VOGEL‐MIKUŠ, Katarina; JEROMEL, Luka et al

in Plant, cell & environment (2014), 37(6), 1299-1320

Cadmium and zinc share many similar physiochemical properties, but their compartmentation, complexation and impact on other mineral element distribution in plant tissues may drastically differ. In this ... [more ▼]

Cadmium and zinc share many similar physiochemical properties, but their compartmentation, complexation and impact on other mineral element distribution in plant tissues may drastically differ. In this study, we address the impact of 10-μM Cd or 50-μM Zn treatment on ion distribution in leaves of a metallicolous population of the non-hyperaccumulating species Zygophyllum fabago at tissue and cell level, and the consequences on the plant response through a combined physiological, proteomic and metabolite approach. Micro-proton induced X-ray emission and laser ablation inductively coupled mass spectrometry analyses indicated hot spots of Cd concentrations in the vicinity of vascular bundles in response to Cd treatment, essentially bound to S-containing compounds as revealed by extended X-Ray absorption fine structure and non-protein thiol compounds analyses. A preferential accumulation of Zn occurred in vascular bundle and spongy mesophyll in response to Zn treatment, and was mainly bound to O/N-ligands. Leaf proteomics and physiological status evidenced a protection of photosynthetically active tissues and the maintenance of cell turgor through specific distribution and complexation of toxic ions, reallocation of some essential elements, synthesis of proteins involved in photosynthetic apparatus or C-metabolism, and metabolite synthesis, with some specificities regarding the considered heavy metal treatment. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (6 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA root chicory MADS-box sequence and the Arabidopsis flowering repressor FLC share common features that suggest conserved function in vernalization and devernalization responses
Périlleux, Claire ULg; Pieltain, Alexandra; Jacquemin, Guillaume et al

in Plant Journal (The) (2013), 75

Root chicory (Cichorium intybus var. sativum) is a biennial crop, but is harvested for root inulin at the end of the first growing season before flowering. However, cold temperatures might vernalize seeds ... [more ▼]

Root chicory (Cichorium intybus var. sativum) is a biennial crop, but is harvested for root inulin at the end of the first growing season before flowering. However, cold temperatures might vernalize seeds or plantlets, leading to incidental early flowering and hence understanding the molecular basis of vernalization is important. A MADS-box sequence was isolated by RT-PCR and named FLC-LIKE1 (CiFL1) because of its phylogenetic positioning within the same clade as the floral repressor Arabidopsis FLOWERING LOCUS C (AtFLC). Moreover, overexpression of CiFL1 in Arabidopsis caused late flowering and prevented up-regulation of the AtFLC target FLOWERING LOCUS T gene by photoperiod, suggesting functional conservation between root chicory and Arabidopsis. Like AtFLC in Arabidopsis, CiFL1 was repressed during vernalization of seeds or plantlets of chicory, but repression of CiFL1 was unstable whether the post-vernalization temperature was favorable to flowering or whether it devernalized the plants. Instability of CiFL1 repression might be linked to bienniality of root chicory versus the annual life cycle of Arabidopsis. However, reactivation of AtFLC was also observed in Arabidopsis when a high temperature treatment was given straight after seed vernalization, erasing the promotive effect of cold on flowering. Cold-induced downregulation of a MADS-box floral repressor and its reactivation by high temperature thus appear as conserved features of the vernalization and devernalization responses in distant species.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 58 (15 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHigh temperatures limit plant growth but hasten flowering in root chicory (Cichorium intybus) independently of vernalisation.
Mathieu, Anne-Sophie; Lutts, Stanley; Vandoorne, Bertrand et al

in Journal of Plant Physiology (2013), in press

An increase in mean and extreme summer temperatures is expected as a consequence of climate changes and this might have an impact on plant development in numerous species. Root chicory (Cichorium intybus ... [more ▼]

An increase in mean and extreme summer temperatures is expected as a consequence of climate changes and this might have an impact on plant development in numerous species. Root chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) is a major crop in northern Europe, and it is cultivated as a source of inulin. This polysaccharide is stored in the tap root during the first growing season when the plant grows as a leafy rosette, whereas bolting and flowering occur in the second year after winter vernalisation. The impact of heat stress on plant phenology, water status, photosynthesis-related parameters, and inulin content was studied in the field and under controlled phytotron conditions. In the field, plants of the Crescendo cultivar were cultivated under a closed plastic-panelled greenhouse to investigate heat-stress conditions, while the control plants were shielded with a similar, but open, structure. In the phytotrons, the Crescendo and Fredonia cultivars were exposed to high temperatures (35 °C day/ 28 °C night) and compared to control conditions (17 °C) over 10 weeks. In the field, heat reduced the root weight, the inulin content of the root and its degree of polymerisation in non-bolting plants. Flowering was observed in 12% of the heat stressed plants during the first growing season in the field. In the phytotron, the heat stress increased the total number of leaves per plant, but reduced the mean leaf area. Photosynthesis efficiency was increased in these plants, whereas osmotic potential was decreased. High temperature was also found to induce flowering of up to 50% of these plants, especially for the Fredonia cultivar. In conclusion, high temperatures induced a reduction in the growth of root chicory, although photosynthesis is not affected. Flowering was also induced, which indicates that high temperatures can partly substitute for the vernalisation requirement for the flowering of root chicory [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 92 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailWater stress drastically reduces root growth and inulin yield in Cichorium intybus (var. sativum) independently of photosynthesis
Vandoorne, Bertrand; Mathieu, Anne-Sophie; Van den Ende, Wim et al

in Journal of Experimental Botany (2012), 63(12), 4359-4373

Root chicory (Cichorium intybus var. sativum) is a cash crop cultivated for inulin production in Western Europe. This plant could be exposed to severe water stress during the three last months of their ... [more ▼]

Root chicory (Cichorium intybus var. sativum) is a cash crop cultivated for inulin production in Western Europe. This plant could be exposed to severe water stress during the three last months of their six months growing period. The aim of this study was to quantify the effect of a progressive decline in water availability on plant growth, photosynthesis and sugar metabolism and to determine its impact on inulin production. Water stress drastically decreased root fresh and dry weight, leaf number, total leaf area and stomatal conductance. Stressed plants, however, increased their water use efficiency, decreased the shoot to root ratio and lowered their osmotic potential through soluble sugar accumulation. Despite a decrease in photosynthetic pigments, the light phase of the photosynthesis remained unaffected under water stress. Water stress increased sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) activity in the leaves, but not in the roots. Water stress inhibited sucrose:sucrose 1-fructosyltransferase (1-SST) and fructan:fructan 1 fructosyltransferase (1—FFT) after 19 weeks of culture and slightly increased fructan 1-exohydrolase activities (1-FEH). The root inulin concentration and the mean degree of polymerisation (DP) of the inulin chain remained however unaffected by water stress. It is concluded that root chicory displayed resistance to water stress, but that such a resistance is obtained at the expense of growth which, in turn, leads to significant decrease in inulin production. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 45 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailOrgan-dependent oxylipin signature in leaves and roots of salinized tomato plants (Solanum lycopersicum)
Ghanem, Michel Edmond; Ghars, Mohamed ali; Frettinger, Patrick et al

in Journal of Plant Physiology (2012), 169

Detailed reference viewed: 61 (6 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailRepression of floral meristem fate is crucial in shaping tomato inflorescence
Thouet, Johanna; Quinet, Muriel; Lutts, Stanley et al

in PLoS ONE (2012), 7(2), 31096

Detailed reference viewed: 59 (15 ULg)
Full Text
See detailThe promotive impact of high temperature on flowering in root chicory (Cichorium intybus L.)
Mathieu, Anne-Sophie; Vandoorne, Bertrand; Quinet, Muriel et al

Poster (2011)

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailRoot-targeted biotechnology to mediate hormonal signaling and improve crop stress tolerance
Ghanem, Michel Edmond; Hichri, Imène; Smigocki, Ann C. et al

in Plant Cell Reports (2011), 30(5), 807-823

Detailed reference viewed: 56 (6 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMucilage and polysaccharides in the halophyte plant species Kosteletzkya virginica : Localozation and composition in relation to salt stress
Ghanem, Michel Edmond; Han, Rui-Ming; Classen, Birgit et al

in Journal of Plant Physiology (2010), 167

Detailed reference viewed: 40 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFunctional analysis of an FLC-LIKE gene in root chicory
Périlleux, Claire ULg; Pieltain, Alexandra ULg; D'Aloia, Maria ULg et al

in Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology. Part A, Physiology (2009), 153A(2/Suppl.), 198-199

Vernalization is known to promote flowering in Arabidopsis thaliana by inhibiting the expression of a strong repressor: FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). The recent cloning of an FLC-LIKE gene in sugar beet (Beta ... [more ▼]

Vernalization is known to promote flowering in Arabidopsis thaliana by inhibiting the expression of a strong repressor: FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). The recent cloning of an FLC-LIKE gene in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris; BvFL1) and – here – in root chicory (Cichorium intybus; CiFL1) suggests the conservation of FLC biological function during evolution of eudicots. Hence physiological questions that remain difficult to address in Arabidopsis can be studied in other species. We investigated the correlation between CiFL1 expression and plant-age dependent responsiveness to vernalization. We also studied the effect of post-vernalization growing temperature, which can stabilize or erase the vernalized state. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 74 (25 ULg)
Full Text
See detailAn FLC-like gene is controlled by vernalization in root chicory
Périlleux, Claire ULg; Pieltain, Alexandra ULg; D'Aloia, Maria ULg et al

Poster (2008, September)

Vernalization is known to promote flowering in Arabidopsis via the repression by cold of the floral inhibitor gene FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). For long, FLC homologs have been found in Brassicaceae only but ... [more ▼]

Vernalization is known to promote flowering in Arabidopsis via the repression by cold of the floral inhibitor gene FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). For long, FLC homologs have been found in Brassicaceae only but it was recently reported that in sugar beet, the FLC-like gene BvFL1 functions as a repressor of flowering and is downregulated in response to cold. We describe here the cloning of CiFL1 from root chicory (Cichorium intybus). Expression patterns were studied in two cultivars, differing in their sensitivity to vernalization. Transcript level analyzes were performed during the vernalization treatment of the seedlings and in different post-vernalization conditions. Our results give further support to conservation of the biological function of FLC-like genes in eudicot species. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 59 (8 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailContribution Of Delayed Autonomous Selfing To Reproductive Success In Kosteletzkya Virginica
Ruan, Cj.; Zhou, Lj.; Zeng, Fy. et al

in Belgian Journal of Botany (2008), 141(1), 3-13

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (1 ULg)