References of "Lussis, Perrine"
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See detailPhysisorbed poly(ethylene oxide) is a robust tether for AFM-based single-molecule force spectroscopy
Willet, Nicolas ULg; Lussis, Perrine ULg; Giamblanco, Nicoletta et al

Conference (2014, December 01)

Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based single-molecule force spectroscopy is a prevalent tool for the exploration of individual (bio)molecules, providing exquisite information on many molecular-level ... [more ▼]

Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based single-molecule force spectroscopy is a prevalent tool for the exploration of individual (bio)molecules, providing exquisite information on many molecular-level processes. For example, proteins, DNA, polysaccharides, supramolecular polymers and polyelectrolytes have been investigated, revealing details about the strength of intramolecular interactions, folding and unfolding pathways, mechanics, conformational changes, reactivity, kinetics, etc. For each particular system under investigation, the experimental design is a decisive phase that often involves a multistep chemical protocol, including grafting, derivatization, coupling, (de-)protection, and other functionalization reactions. Procedures of sample preparation are often complex and time-consuming. Hence, there is a need for new general platforms allowing for straightforward sample preparation adapted to single-molecule studies, i.e. a tight attachment to both the substrate and the tip, and a low density to favor single-molecule detection. We report here on the use of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) as a tether to probe various properties of individual molecules. The polymeric linker acts as a handle that stably binds to the AFM tip. The simple adsorption of poly(ethylene oxide) to the tip is versatile and provides an appropriate system configuration for the investigation of many different biological and synthetic molecular systems. To attest for this versatility and adequacy with advanced single-molecule investigation, we present different examples of PEO-mediated studies about the unfolding of a synthetic peptide, the mechanochemical behavior of a molecular machine and finally the stability of a metallo-supramolecular complexed polymer. All the requirements for the study of peptide conformation, tiny molecular machines or metallo-supramolecular interactions in solution are here fulfilled. More generally, this method based on non-covalent sorption of PEO on an AFM tip, can be implemented in a wide range of solvents, for the study of many intra- or intermolecular phenomena at the single-molecule level over orders of magnitude of force loading rates. Connecting PEO tethers to a very broad variety of (bio)molecules is a facile and versatile route. The commercial availability of many different functional PEOs makes this tethering strategy even more accessible. [less ▲]

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See detailMechanical Processes of a Single Synthetic Molecular Machine Studied by AFM-based Force Spectroscopy
Lussis, Perrine ULg

Doctoral thesis (2012)

Some biomolecules are able to generate directional forces by rectifying random thermal motions. This allows these molecular machines to perform mechanical tasks such as intracellular cargo transport or ... [more ▼]

Some biomolecules are able to generate directional forces by rectifying random thermal motions. This allows these molecular machines to perform mechanical tasks such as intracellular cargo transport or muscle contraction in plants and animals. Although some artificial molecular machines have been synthesized and used collectively to perform mechanical tasks, so far there have been no direct measurements of mechanical processes at the single-molecule level. Here we report measurements of the mechanical work performed by a synthetic molecule less than 5 nm long. We show that biased Brownian motion of the submolecular components in a hydrogen-bonded [2]rotaxane -a molecular ring threaded onto a molecular axle- can be harnessed to generate significant directional forces. We used the cantilever of an atomic force microscope to apply a mechanical load to the ring during single-molecule pulling-relaxing cycles. The ring was pulled along the axle, away from the thermodynamically favoured binding site, and was then found to travel back to this site against an external load of 30 pN. Using fluctuation theorems, we were able to relate the measurements of the work done at the level of individual molecules to the free energy change measured previously by ensemble measurements. Finally, we used dynamic single-molecule force spectroscopy to probe kinetic information of the interaction between the molecular ring and the preferred binding site. The results also demonstrate that AFM-based single-molecule force spectroscopy, which has been widely used to investigate the mechanochemical behaviour of (bio)macromolecules, can be applied to a molecule that is less than 5 nm in its extended form. [less ▲]

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See detailA single synthetic small molecule that generates force against a load
Lussis, Perrine ULg; Svaldo Lanero, Tiziana ULg; Bertocco, Andrea et al

in Nature Nanotechnology (2011), 6

Some biomolecules are able to generate directional forces by rectifying random thermal motions. This allows these molecular machines to perform mechanical tasks such as intracellular cargo transport or ... [more ▼]

Some biomolecules are able to generate directional forces by rectifying random thermal motions. This allows these molecular machines to perform mechanical tasks such as intracellular cargo transport or muscle contraction in plants and animals. Although some artificial molecular machines have been synthesized and used collectively to perform mechanical tasks, so far there have been no direct measurements of mechanical processes at the single-molecule level. Here we report measurements of the mechanical work performed by a synthetic molecule less than 5 nm long. We show that biased Brownian motion of the sub-molecular components in a hydro- gen-bonded [2]rotaxane—a molecular ring threaded onto a molecular axle—can be harnessed to generate significant directional forces. We used the cantilever of an atomic force microscope to apply a mechanical load to the ring during single-molecule pulling–relaxing cycles. The ring was pulled along the axle, away from the thermodynamically favoured binding site, and was then found to travel back to this site against an external load of 30 pN. Using fluctuation theorems, we were able to relate measurements of the work done at the level of individual rotaxane molecules to the free-energy change as previously determined from ensemble measurements. The results show that individual rotaxanes can generate directional forces of similar magnitude to those generated by natural molecular machines. [less ▲]

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See detailContribution of "click chemistry" to the macromolecular engineering of aliphatic polyesters
Riva, Raphaël ULg; Schmeits, Stephanie ULg; Croisier, Florence ULg et al

Poster (2010, July 13)

In this work, click chemistry was sucessfully applied to the chemical modification of aliphatic polyesters with the purpose to tailor their physical properties. The developped strategy was then applied to ... [more ▼]

In this work, click chemistry was sucessfully applied to the chemical modification of aliphatic polyesters with the purpose to tailor their physical properties. The developped strategy was then applied to the synthesis of materials, such as smart partially degradable hydrogels or antibacterial polyesters. Last, the synthesis of amphiphilic star-shaped copolyester was investigated. [less ▲]

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See detailA generic chemical platform for molecular recognition and stimuli-responsive probes based on scanning probe microscopy
Cecchet, Francesca; Lussis, Perrine ULg; Jérôme, Christine ULg et al

in Small : Nano Micro (2008), 4(8), 1101-1104

The grafting of poly-N-succinimidyl acrylate from scanning probe microscopy tips is shown to be a robust platform for the very easy elaboration of versatile probes with sensor capabilities and tunable ... [more ▼]

The grafting of poly-N-succinimidyl acrylate from scanning probe microscopy tips is shown to be a robust platform for the very easy elaboration of versatile probes with sensor capabilities and tunable properties. The modified tips can be easily postfunctionalized for single-molecule recognition of host-guest and ligand-receptor systems and for the design of smart probes that are thermo- and pH-responsive. [less ▲]

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See detailContribution of "click chemistry" to the synthesis of antimicrobial aliphatic copolyester
Riva, Raphaël ULg; Lussis, Perrine ULg; Lenoir, Sandrine ULg et al

in Polymer (2008), 49(8), 2023-2028

A straightforward strategy is proposed to impart antimicrobial properties to biodegradable poly(oxepan-2-one) (poly(epsilon-caprolactone) or PCL), which is based on the grafting of pendant ammonium salts ... [more ▼]

A straightforward strategy is proposed to impart antimicrobial properties to biodegradable poly(oxepan-2-one) (poly(epsilon-caprolactone) or PCL), which is based on the grafting of pendant ammonium salts by "click" chemistry. First, statistical copolymerization of 3-chlorooxepan-2-one (alpha-chloro-epsilon-caprolactone or alpha Cl epsilon CL) with oxepan-2-one (epsilon-caprolactone or epsilon CL) was initiated by 2,2-dibutyl-2-stanna-1,3-dioxepane (DSDOP). In a second step, pendant chlorides were converted into azides by reaction with sodium azide (NaN3). Finally, quaternary ammonium containing alkynes were quantitatively added to the pendant azide groups of PCL by the copper-catalyzed Huisgen's 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition, which is a typical "click" reaction. An alternative two-step strategy based on the cycloaddition of the amine containing alkyne onto the pendant azides, followed by quaternization turned out to be less efficient. The antimicrobial activity was analyzed by the "shaking flask method" in the presence of Escherichia coli [less ▲]

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See detailPH-responsive biodegradable amphiphilic networks
Zednik, Jiri; Riva, Raphaël ULg; Lussis, Perrine ULg et al

in Polymer (2008), 49(3), 697-702

Copper-mediated azide - alkyne Huisgen's 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition is a "click" reaction that was successfully used to prepare pH-responsive, amphiphilic and biodegradable networks. Indeed, this reaction ... [more ▼]

Copper-mediated azide - alkyne Huisgen's 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition is a "click" reaction that was successfully used to prepare pH-responsive, amphiphilic and biodegradable networks. Indeed, this reaction proved to be very efficient in the "one pot" grafting of amino alkyne onto azide containing poly(epsilon-caprolactone) and the cross-linking of these chains by alpha,omega-dialkynyl poly(ethylene oxide). The pH-controlled release of guests hosted during the cross-linking step was illustrated with an entrapped model dye. [less ▲]

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See detailContribution of "click" chemistry to the functionalization of aliphatic polyesters
Schmeits, Stephanie ULg; Riva, Raphaël ULg; Zednik, Jiri et al

Poster (2007, August 31)

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (11 ULg)