References of "Ludwig, H"
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See detailA European patient record study on diagnosis and treatment of chemotherapy-induced anaemia
Ludwig, H.; Aapro, M.; Bokemeyer, C. et al

in Supportive Care in Cancer (in press)

Purpose – Patients with cancer frequently experience chemotherapy‐induced anaemia (CIA) and iron deficiency (ID). Erythropoiesis‐stimulating agents (ESA), iron supplementation and blood transfusions are ... [more ▼]

Purpose – Patients with cancer frequently experience chemotherapy‐induced anaemia (CIA) and iron deficiency (ID). Erythropoiesis‐stimulating agents (ESA), iron supplementation and blood transfusions are available therapies. This study evaluated routine practice in CIA management. Methods – Medical oncologists and/or haematologists from nine European countries (n=375) were surveyed on their last five cancer patients treated for CIA (n=1730). Information was collected on tests performed at diagnosis of anaemia, levels of haemoglobin (Hb), serum ferritin and transferrin saturation (TSAT), and applied anaemia therapies. Results – Diagnostic tests and therapies for CIA varied across Europe. Anaemia and iron status were mainly assessed by Hb (94%) and ferritin (48%) measurements. TSAT was only tested in 14%. At anaemia diagnosis, 74% of patients had Hb ≤10g/dL, including 15% with severe (Hb <8g/dL) anaemia. Low iron levels (ferritin ≤100ng/mL) were detected in 42% of evaluated patients. ESA was the most commonly used treatment (63%) and 30% of ESA‐treated patients also received iron supplementation. Most iron‐treated patients (74%) received an oral iron; intravenous iron was administered to 26%. 52% of patients received transfusions and in 76% of these, transfusions formed part of a regular anaemia treatment regimen. Management practices were similar in 2009 and 2011. Conclusion – Management of anaemia and iron status in patients treated for CIA varies substantially across Europe. Iron status is only assessed in half of the patients. In contrast to clinical evidence, iron treatment is underutilised and mainly based on oral iron supplementation. Implementation of guidelines needs to be increased, particularly the minimisation of blood transfusions. [less ▲]

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See detailEpidemiological and nonclinical studies investigating effects of iron in carcinogenesis-A critical review
Beguin, Yves ULg; Aapro, M.; Ludwig, H. et al

in Critical Reviews in Oncology/Hematology (2014), 89

The efficacy and tolerability of intravenous (i.v.) iron in managing cancer-related anemia and iron deficiency has been clinically evaluated and reviewed recently. However, long-term data in cancer ... [more ▼]

The efficacy and tolerability of intravenous (i.v.) iron in managing cancer-related anemia and iron deficiency has been clinically evaluated and reviewed recently. However, long-term data in cancer patients are not available; yet, long-term i.v. iron treatment in hemodialysis patients is not associated with increased cancer risk. This review summarizes epidemiological and nonclinical data on the role of iron in carcinogenesis. In humans, epidemiological data suggest correlations between certain cancers and increased iron exposure or iron overload. Nonclinical models that investigated whether iron can enhance carcinogenesis provide only limited evidence relevant for cancer patients since they were typically based on high iron doses as well as injection routes and iron formulations which are not used in the clinical setting. Nevertheless, in the absence of long-term outcome data from prospectively defined trials in i.v. iron-treated cancer patients, iron supplementation should be limited to periods of concomitant anti-tumor treatment. [less ▲]

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See detailPlasma cell leukemia: consensus statement on diagnostic requirements, response criteria and treatment recommendations by the International Myeloma Working Group.
Fernández de Larrea, C; Kyle, RA; Durie, BG et al

in Leukemia : Official Journal of the Leukemia Society of America, Leukemia Research Fund, U.K (2013), 27(4), 780-91

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See detailPrevalence and management of cancer-related anaemia, iron deficiency and the specific role of intravenous iron
Aapro, M.; Osterborg, A.; Gascon, P. et al

in Annals of Oncology (2012), 23

Background: Chronic diseases reduce the availability of iron for effective erythropoiesis. This review summarises clinical consequences of iron deficiency (ID) and anaemia in cancer patients, mechanisms ... [more ▼]

Background: Chronic diseases reduce the availability of iron for effective erythropoiesis. This review summarises clinical consequences of iron deficiency (ID) and anaemia in cancer patients, mechanisms how impaired iron homeostasis affects diagnosis and treatment of ID, and data from clinical trials evaluating i.v. iron with or without concomitant erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs). Design: Clinical trial reports were identified in PubMed and abstracts at relevant major congresses. Results: Reported prevalence of ID in cancer patients ranges from 32 to 60% and most iron-deficient patients are also anaemic. Randomised clinical trials have shown superior efficacy of i.v. iron over oral or no iron in reducing blood transfusions, increasing haemoglobin, and improving quality of life in ESA-treated anaemic cancer patients. Furthermore, i.v. iron without additional ESA should be evaluated as potential treatment in patients with chemotherapyinduced anaemia. At recommended doses, i.v. iron is well tolerated, particularly compared with oral iron. No serious drug-related adverse effects were seen during long-term use in renal disease and no effect on tumour growth has been observed in trials with anaemic cancer patients. Conclusions: Reliable diagnosis and treatment of ID are recommended key steps in modern cancer patient management to minimise impact on quality of life and performance status. [less ▲]

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See detailRecombinant Interferon alfa-2c versus polychemotherapy (VMCP) for treatment of multiple myeloma : a prospective randomized trial
Ludwig, H.; Cortelezzi, A.; Scheithauer, W. et al

in European Journal of Cancer & Clinical Oncology (1986), 22

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