References of "Losson, Bertrand"
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See detailComparaison des populations de Culicoides Latreille 1809 (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) d’une bergerie belge et d’une prairie ovine associée
Zimmer, Jean-Yves ULg; Losson, Bertrand ULg; Saegerman, Claude et al

in Annales de la Société Entomologique de France (2014)

Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) serve as biological vectors for several pathogens, including the Bluetongue virus and the recently described Schmallenberg virus in northern Europe ... [more ▼]

Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) serve as biological vectors for several pathogens, including the Bluetongue virus and the recently described Schmallenberg virus in northern Europe. These diseases have caused considerable direct and indirect economic losses to the sheep and cattle industries. This study undertaken between August and December 2007 on a sheep farm in the Namur province (Belgium) aims to evaluate Culicoides populations present inside a partially opened sheepfold and in a nearby sheep meadow, using light traps. The comparative analysis of insects trapped at 18 dates at regular intervals showed that Culicoides were most abundant inside this livestock building (17,450 midges) than in surrounding meadow (1,121 midges); this meadow had however a greater species diversity. The two species C. obsoletus and C. scoticus constituting the Obsoletus complex predominated for all trappings and females were much more numerous than males. Important capture of engorged females of the Obsoletus complex inside the sheepfold seems to reflect the possibility of an opportunistic endophagous behavior. Maintaining sheep inside livestock buildings in order to reduce the risk of Culicoides bites – and thus of pathogens transmission – however requires to limit biting midge populations which are likely to enter or to develop inside these buildings. Implementation of effective sanitation and hygiene measures against midges present inside farms, as well as establishing of measures to protect livestock against intrusion and improvement of “midge-proofing” of animal housing are therefore highly recommended. [less ▲]

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See detailMorphological and Molecular Characterization of Lymnaeid Snails and Their Potential Role in Transmission of Fasciola spp. in Vietnam
Bui Thi, Dung ULg; Pham Ngoc, Doanh; Dang Tat, The et al

in Korean Journal of Parasitology (2013), 51(6), 657-662

Freshwater snails of the family Lymnaeidae play an important role in the transmission of fascioliasis worldwide. In Vietnam, 2 common lymnaeid species, Lymnaea swinhoei and Lymnaea viridis, can be ... [more ▼]

Freshwater snails of the family Lymnaeidae play an important role in the transmission of fascioliasis worldwide. In Vietnam, 2 common lymnaeid species, Lymnaea swinhoei and Lymnaea viridis, can be recognized on the basis of morphology, and a third species, Lymnaea sp., is known to exist. Recent studies have raised controversy about their role in transmission of Fasciola spp. because of confusion in identification of the snail hosts. The aim of this study is, therefore, to clarify the identities of lymnaeid snails in Vietnam by a combination of morphological and molecular approaches. The molecular analyses using the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) of the nuclear ribosomal DNA clearly showed that lymnaeids in Vietnam include 3 species, Austropeplea viridis (morphologically identified as L. viridis), Radix auricularia (morphologically identified as L. swinhoei) and Radix rubiginosa (morphologically identified as Lymnaea sp.). R. rubiginosa is a new record for Vietnam. Among them, only A. viridis was found to be infected with Fasciola spp. These results provide a new insight into lymnaeid snails in Vietnam. Identification of lymnaeid snails in Vietnam and their role in the liver fluke transmission should be further investigated. [less ▲]

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See detailBreeding sites and species association of the main Bluetongue and Schmallenberg virus vectors, the Culicoides species (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), in northern Europe
Zimmer, Jean-Yves ULg; Losson, Bertrand ULg; Saegerman, Claude ULg et al

in Annales de la Société Entomologique de France (2013), 49(3), 335-344

Several species of Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) biting midges are biological vectors of bluetongue virus (BTV) and, as recently discovered, Schmallenberg virus (SBV) in northern Europe. Since ... [more ▼]

Several species of Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) biting midges are biological vectors of bluetongue virus (BTV) and, as recently discovered, Schmallenberg virus (SBV) in northern Europe. Since their recent emergence in this part of the continent, these diseases that affect domestic and wild ruminants have caused considerable economic losses to the sheep and cattle industries. The substrates that are suitable for larval development of the main vector species are still relatively unknown. This study assessed all the substrates present in the immediate surroundings of a Belgian cattle farm and aimed to highlight the main breeding sites of these midge species. A total of 1639 immature Culicoides and 1320 adult specimens belonging to 13 species were found in 15 out of the 43 substrates studied: maize silage residues for C. obsoletus/C. scoticus, old overwintered cattle dung in the meadow for C. chiopterus and C. dewulfi, ground of a flooded meadow, green filamentous algae and underlying substrate, silt from a pond, and ground of hollows caused by the crossing of machines on a dirt track for C. festivipennis, silt from a pond for C. nubeculosus, and ground of a flooded meadow for C. lupicaris. Identification of these micro-habitats and the associations among the species they contain could allow their localization and the development of new strategies of vector control, while preventing the creation of new Culicoides larval micro-habitats. Finally, measures designed to reduce larval populations could improve efficacy of vaccination campaigns against BTV in Europe. [less ▲]

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See detailAre bogs reservoirs for emerging disease vectors? Evaluation of Culicoides populations in the Hautes Fagnes Nature Reserve (Belgium)
Zimmer, Jean-Yves ULg; Losson, Bertrand ULg; Smeets, François ULg et al

Poster (2013, October)

Several species of Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) biting midges serve as biological vec{ors for the bluetongue virus (BTV) and the recently described Schmallenberg virus in northern Europe. since ... [more ▼]

Several species of Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) biting midges serve as biological vec{ors for the bluetongue virus (BTV) and the recently described Schmallenberg virus in northern Europe. since their recent emergence in this part of the continent, these diseases have caused considerable economic losses to the sheep and cattle industries. Much data is nou, âvailable that describe the distribuüon, population dynamics, and feeding habits of these insects. However, little is known regarding the presence of culicoides in unusual habitats such as peaÿ marshes, nor their potential vector capacity. This study evaluated Culicoides biting midges present in the bogs of a Belgian nature reserve compared to those residing at a nearby cattle farm. Culicoides were trapped in 2011 at four different sites (broadleaved and coniferous forested areas, open environments, and at a scientific station) located in the Hautes Fagnes Nature Reserve (Belgium). An additional light trap was operated on a nearby caftle farm. High numbers of biting midges were captured in the marshy area and most of them were Culicoides impunc{atus, a potential vector of BïV and other pâthogens. ln addition, fewer numbers of c. obsoletus/c. scoticus species, C. chiopterus, and C. dewulfi were observed in the bogs compared to the farm. The wet environment and oligotrophic nature of the soil were probably responsible for these changes in the respective populations. A total of 297,808 Culicoides midges belonging to 27 species were identified during this study and 3 of these species (C. sphagnumensis, C. clintoni and C. comosioculatus) were described in Belgium for the first time. [less ▲]

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See detailPrevalence and Richness of Gastrointestinal Parasites of Capuchins (Cebus albifrons) Interacting with humans in the Ecuadorian Amazon
Ramirez, William; Martin, Sarah ULg; Carrillo Bilbao, Gabriel Alberto et al

Poster (2013, September 10)

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See detailPrimate Behaviour and Parasite Transmission in the Ecuadorian Amazon
Martin, Sarah ULg; Carrillo Bilbao, Gabriel Alberto; Bernstein, Sophie et al

in Folia Primatologica : International Journal of Primatology = Internationale Zeitschrift für Primatologie = Journal international de Primatologie (2013, August 10), 84(3-5), 135-346

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See detailAre Bogs Reservoirs for Emerging Disease Vectors? Evaluation of Culicoides Populations in the Hautes Fagnes Nature Reserve (Belgium)
Zimmer, Jean-Yves ULg; Smeets, François ULg; Simonon, Grégory et al

in PLoS ONE (2013), 8(6),

Several species of Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) biting midges serve as biological vectors for the bluetongue virus (BTV) and the recently described Schmallenberg virus (SBV) in northern Europe ... [more ▼]

Several species of Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) biting midges serve as biological vectors for the bluetongue virus (BTV) and the recently described Schmallenberg virus (SBV) in northern Europe. Since their recent emergence in this part of the continent, these diseases have caused considerable economic losses to the sheep and cattle industries. Much data is now available that describe the distribution, population dynamics, and feeding habits of these insects. However, little is known regarding the presence of Culicoides in unusual habitats such as peaty marshes, nor their potential vector capacity. This study evaluated Culicoides biting midges present in the bogs of a Belgian nature reserve compared to those residing at a nearby cattle farm. Culicoides were trapped in 2011 at four different sites (broadleaved and coniferous forested areas, open environments, and at a scientific station) located in the Hautes Fagnes Nature Reserve (Belgium). An additional light trap was operated on a nearby cattle farm. Very high numbers of biting midges were captured in the marshy area and most of them (70 to 95%) were Culicoides impunctatus, a potential vector of BTV and other pathogens. In addition, fewer numbers of C. obsoletus/C. scoticus species, C. chiopterus, and C. dewulfi were observed in the bogs compared to the farm. The wet environment and oligotrophic nature of the soil were probably responsible for these changes in the respective populations. A total of 297,808 Culicoides midges belonging to 27 species were identified during this study and 3 of these species (C. sphagnumensis, C. clintoni and C. comosioculatus) were described in Belgium for the first time. [less ▲]

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See detailThree cases of Parafilaria bovicola infection in Belgium, and a few recent epidemiological observations on this emergent disease
Caron, Yannick ULg; Groignet, Stéphanie; Saegerman, Claude ULg et al

in Veterinary Record : Journal of the British Veterinary Association (2013), 175

Parafilariosis is a vector borne parasitic disease caused by the development of the nematode Parafilaria bovicola in the subcutaneous and intermuscular connective tissues of cattle. On February 28th 2012 ... [more ▼]

Parafilariosis is a vector borne parasitic disease caused by the development of the nematode Parafilaria bovicola in the subcutaneous and intermuscular connective tissues of cattle. On February 28th 2012, the so-called bleeding spots were observed in two heifers and one bull in a cattle herd close to Namur (Belgium). The animals had been treated in December with an injectable ivermectin/closantel solution (Closamectin pour on®, Norbrook Lab) at the recommended dosage. Samples of serohaemorrhagic exudate and blood as well as skin biopsies were collected. Embryonated eggs of Parafilaria bovicola in the serohaemorrhagic exudate and high levels of creatine phosphokinase (CPK) were detected. Clinically affected animals were treated with injectable ivermectin (Ivomec®, Merial) at 200 µg/kg. Two epidemiological phone surveys were carried out in the south of Belgium (Wallonia) in order to estimate the geographical distribution of this condition since it was first described and published in 2009. A standardized questionnaire was used and the results were analysed. Most outbreaks were recorded in the provinces of Liege and Luxembourg. The initial source of infection is still unknown but this parasitic infection is clearly spreading from the initial Belgian outbreak site. [less ▲]

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See detailThelazia callipaeda ocular infection in two dogs in Belgium
Caron, Yannick ULg; Prémont, Johanna ULg; Losson, Bertrand ULg et al

in Journal of Small Animal Practice (2013), 54(3),

Eyeworms were retrieved from the left eyes of two dogs presented for unilateral ocular discharge in Belgium. Morphological and molecular identification were performed and the parasites were identified as ... [more ▼]

Eyeworms were retrieved from the left eyes of two dogs presented for unilateral ocular discharge in Belgium. Morphological and molecular identification were performed and the parasites were identified as Thelazia callipaeda. The history suggested that the infection had been acquired in South-Western France and Southern Italy where the disease has been observed regularly for the last 6 and 12 years, respectively. In these two regions, the disease is considered endemic and spreading. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first complete case report of canine thelaziosis in Belgium. The risk of introduction of the parasite in Northern Europe and particularly in Belgium is discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailZoonoses in Pet 1 birds: review and perspectives
Boseret, Géraldine ULg; Losson, Bertrand ULg; Mainil, Jacques ULg et al

in Veterinary Research (2013)

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See detailChemical composition of silage residues sustaining the larval development of the Culicoides obsoletus/Culicoides scoticus species (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae)
Zimmer, Jean-Yves ULg; Saegerman, Claude ULg; Losson, Bertrand ULg et al

in Veterinary Parasitology (2013), 191(1-2), 197-201

Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are biological vectors of bluetongue virus (BTV). Bluetongue is a viral disease that affects domestic and wild ruminants. Since its recent emergence in northern ... [more ▼]

Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are biological vectors of bluetongue virus (BTV). Bluetongue is a viral disease that affects domestic and wild ruminants. Since its recent emergence in northern Europe, this disease has caused considerable economic losses to the sheep and cattle industry. The biotopes, and more particularly the chemical characteristics which are suitable for larval development of the main vector species, are still relatively unknown. This study shows that the larvae of biting midges belonging to the species Culicoides obsoletus and Culicoides scoticus are able to breed in different types of silage residue (maize, grass, sugar beet pulp and their combinations). The chemical composition of substrates strongly influences the presence of the immature stages of these biting midges. Higher lignin and insoluble fibre contents seem to favour their presence and could play the role of a physical support for semi-aquatic larvae. In contrast, higher concentrations of magnesium and calcium are negatively correlated with the presence of these two species. These data will help to locate and monitor the breeding sites of these species and could contribute to the control of these insects on farms. [less ▲]

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See detailSeasonal change of Lymnaeid snails intermediate host of Fasciola gigantica in North and Central Vietnam
Bui Thi, Dung ULg; Dang Tat, The; Pham Ngoc, Doanh et al

Conference (2012, December)

Objective: The present study was undertaken to investigate the population dynamics of the intermediate hosts of Fasciola gigantica and the levels of infection in the snails. This would allow identifying ... [more ▼]

Objective: The present study was undertaken to investigate the population dynamics of the intermediate hosts of Fasciola gigantica and the levels of infection in the snails. This would allow identifying the most important transmission periods and suggesting optimal snail control for the area. Methods: Lymnaeid snails were monthly collected by hand picking in Ha Noi (Northern Vietnam) during the period from March 2010 to December 2011 and in Binh Dinh province (Central Vietnam) during the period May and September 2012. Collected snails from different sites were identified based on morphology and the partial 16S rDNA sequence and ITS-2 sequence. Snails were examined for the presence of Fasciola larval by the crushing method and confirmation by multiplex PCR analyses with PCR primer for Fasciola gigantica cathepsin L in parallel with the snail rDNA species specific primer. Result: The density of Lymnaeid populations underwent great changes in relation to the geographical locations and seasons. In Central Vietnam, the Lymnaeid populations reached the peak in the dry/rainy season (May) and decreased sharply in rainy/dry season (September). In contrast, in Hanoi, it reached the peaks in 2 periods (February to April and August to November) of rice cultivation or early stage of growing of rice, and greatly deceased when the rice becomes fully developed. Transmission of fascioliasis in Ha Noi were high when rice cultivation is performed, while the permanent transmission can takes place through the year in Binh Dinh with peak transmission during the dry season. [less ▲]

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See detailCulicoides (Diptera : Ceratopogonidae) : important vectors of cattle diseases. Control assays in Belgium
Smeets, François ULg; Robert, Nancy; Simonon, Grégory et al

Poster (2012, October 19)

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See detailBreeding sites of main Bluetongue virus vectors in Belgian cowshed
Zimmer, Jean-Yves ULg; Saegerman, Claude ULg; Losson, Bertrand ULg et al

Poster (2012, August)

Bluetongue (BT) is an emerging vectorborne disease of ruminants that was reported in August 2006 in northern Europe. Since 2007, BT virus (BTV) serotype 8 continued its spread across Europe and caused ... [more ▼]

Bluetongue (BT) is an emerging vectorborne disease of ruminants that was reported in August 2006 in northern Europe. Since 2007, BT virus (BTV) serotype 8 continued its spread across Europe and caused considerable economic losses. This observation indicates possible overwintering of the vector from year to year. The biological vectors of BTV are biting midges of the genus Culicoides. Breeding sites of bluetongue vector species have been found near farms (e.g. silage residues) and in neighboring meadows (e.g. cattle dung) but never inside sheds. We conducted a study in five cattle farms in Belgium during February–October 2008. Three samplings were performed and each soil sample collected inside cowsheds was incubated to enable adult midges to emerge. Among 15 soil biotopes sampled, only one showed the emergence of adult Culicoides biting midges: dried dung adhering to walls inside animal enclosures and resulting to the partial removal of used animal litter. It was a breeding site for the C. obsoletus/C. scoticus complex. Physico-chemical characteristics showed that midges of this complex are more prevalent in soil samples with a high carbon:nitrogen (C:N) index. So Culicoides biting midges are able to complete their life cycle in animal enclosures. We identified a breeding site for the primary BTV vector in a cowshed in northern Europe. These observations could explain the persistence of BTV from year to year despite fairly harsh winters. Hygienic measures on farms could reduce biting midges populations and so improve efficacy of vaccination campaigns against BT in Europe. [less ▲]

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See detailParásitos en primates de la Amazonía Ecuatoriana: una herramienta para la salud pública y la conservación
Martin, Sarah ULg; Carrillo-Bilbao, Gabriel Alberto; Celi, Maritza et al

Conference (2012, June 22)

Los primates son reservorios de patógenos humanos ya sea que estén en libertad o en cautiverio. Si identificamos los parásitos y las enfermedades que estos ocasionan en primates, sería una herramienta ... [more ▼]

Los primates son reservorios de patógenos humanos ya sea que estén en libertad o en cautiverio. Si identificamos los parásitos y las enfermedades que estos ocasionan en primates, sería una herramienta para su conservación y un aporte significativo para la salud pública. Colectamos e identificamos los parásitos gastrointestinales de 10 especies de primates de la Amazonía ecuatoriana. Se utilizo la técnica de flotación con solución de azúcar sobre saturada (d≈1.28 - 1.33) y la técnica de Ritchie. Las muestras fueron analizadas según factores extrínsecos e intrínsecos de los primates. Los valores generales de prevalencia para protozoarios y helmintos fueron de 17.6% y 55.4% respectivamente. Infecciones con un solo parásito fueron observadas en 46% de las muestras e infecciones con dos o más parásitos fueron observadas en tan solo 17.6% de las muestras. Las hembras tuvieron mayor prevalencia (93.33%) que los machos (68.75%). Más de la mitad de los parásitos encontrados en este estudio (Necator/Ancylostoma, Capillaria sp., Strongylus sp., Entamoeba histolytica, Hymenolepis sp., Oesophagostomum sp.) son una amenaza potencial de transmisión zoonótica. Lagothrix lagotricha tiene la mayor diversidad de parásitos (7) en comparación con las otras especies de primates estudiadas. Este estudio muestra una diversidad de parásitos de importancia zoonótica, lo cual demuestra el interés que deber presentarse tanto para el manejo de fauna silvestre como para programas de salud pública. [less ▲]

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See detailLongitudinal field study on bovine Babesia spp. and Anaplasma phagocytophilum infections during a grazing season in Belgium
Lempereur, Laetitia ULg; Lebrun, Maude; Cuvelier, Pascale et al

in Parasitology Research (2012), 110(4), 1525-1530

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