References of "Lorquet, Sophie"
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See detailKilling kinetics of clinical isolates of group B streptococci isolated in Belgium for penicillin alone or in combination with gentamicin
MELIN, Pierrette ULg; Lorquet, Sophie; HAYETTE, Marie-Pierre ULg et al

Poster (2005, September)

BACKGROUND: Associated with high morbidity and mortality, severe GBS infections should be treated with antimicrobial agents alone or in combination characterized by both a good diffusion at the site of ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Associated with high morbidity and mortality, severe GBS infections should be treated with antimicrobial agents alone or in combination characterized by both a good diffusion at the site of infection and a short bactericidal lag time. Penicillin (P) or another blactam used in combination with an aminoglycoside is usually recommended to start the therapy. MICs to gentamicin (G) of GBS recently isolated in Belgium range from 16 to 256 mg/L (> or = MICs of E.faecalis with low level resistance to G, LLR). OBJECTIVES: To investigate in vitro, the potential synergism of P+G on strains of GBS isolated in Belgium. METHODS: According to Etest-AB Biodisk original procedures, for 6 Belgian strains of GBS (G MICs: 16-128 mg/L), we investigated the potential synergism, MICs and time killing curves, between P and G (ratio1:1). In the killing kinetic assays, surviving organisms were enumerated initially and repeatedly after 2, 4, 8 and 20 hours (T2, T4, T8 and T20) at concentrations of P equal to 4 and 16x MICs. Two strains of E.faecalis (1 HighLR and 1 LLR to G) were used as negative and positive control. Each isolate was tested twice. RESULTS: For GBS the P MICs in the combination were within +/- 1 dilution compared with single drug. As expected, P+G produced enhanced killing at T2 and T4 compared with P alone for G LLR E.faecalis and there was no difference for the G HLR E.faecalis. On the contrary, no accelerated killing was observed for any GBS isolate with the combination even for a concentration of 16xMIC of P; moreover for 3 isolates a reduced killing was observed at T2 in the combination tests compared with P alone. CONCLUSION: This limited in vitro testing of the combination P+G compared with P alone for Belgian GBS isolates did not show any synergism or accelerated killing. Moreover the killing was reduced at T2 for half of the isolates. Further evaluation should be performed on these strains with other ratio or other b-lactams as ampicillin in combination with G. [less ▲]

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See detailHow many women can benefit from a full intrapartum antibiotic prphylaxis for prevention of perinatal group B streptococcal disease?
MELIN, Pierrette ULg; Lorquet, Sophie; Rodriguez Cuns, Grisel et al

in American Society of Microbiology (Ed.) Program and Abstracts of the 44th Intersciences Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (2004, November)

Background: In Belgium as in many Western countries, GBS are still the leading cause of severe perinatal infections. Current guidelines for prevention recommend intrapartum antimicrobial prohylaxis (IAP ... [more ▼]

Background: In Belgium as in many Western countries, GBS are still the leading cause of severe perinatal infections. Current guidelines for prevention recommend intrapartum antimicrobial prohylaxis (IAP) administered promptly before delivery to pregnant women colonized with GBS. The risk of vertical GBS transmission to the newborn decreases as the duration of prophylaxis increases. The considered threshold for prophylaxis adequacy is the first dose administered at least 4 hours before delivery. Objective: To evaluate the proportion of pregnant women who could benefit from an adequate IAP for the prevention of GBS perinatal infections. Methods: Between June and October 2003, we recorded in two hospitals the elapse time between admission for labor and delivery. We assumed 5 hours represent a useful threshold to allow admission, revision of chart and administration of adequate IAP. The status of vaginal colonization with GBS was determined by CDC’s recommended culture method with Granada agar added. Results: Among 532 women, 27.3 % delivered within 5 hours after admission for labor. The colonization rate for GBS was 25.6 %. The distribution of elapse time between admission and delivery for GBS colonized pregnant women was not significantly different from non colonized women (p <= 1). Conclusions: 1) With the current prevention strategy, 27.3 % of these pregnant women would not have benefit from adequate prophylaxis 2) These results highlight the importance of an efficient organization to warranty prompt administration of IAP as soon as possible when mandatory. 3) If a rapid intrapartum screening test is used, no delay can be afforded “from ward to bench to bed”. [less ▲]

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See detailReal-Time PCR detection of group B streptococci from pregnant women's vaginal specimens at time of delivery: clinical evaluation
MELIN, Pierrette ULg; Rodriguez Cuns, Grisel; Lorquet, Sophie et al

in American Society of Microbiology (Ed.) Program and Abstracts of the 44th Intersciences Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (2004, November)

Guidelines for prevention recommend intrapartum antimicrobial prohylaxis (IAP) for pregnant women with a positive prenatal culture-based screening for GBS. To improve this strategy, a rapid screening ... [more ▼]

Guidelines for prevention recommend intrapartum antimicrobial prohylaxis (IAP) for pregnant women with a positive prenatal culture-based screening for GBS. To improve this strategy, a rapid screening performed at the onset of labor with the IDI-Strep BTM test (IDI), a real time PCR detection (Infectio Diagnostic), may be used. Objective: To evaluate the performance of the IDI to detect GBS from vaginal specimens collected at time of delivery. Methods: Intrapartum vaginal specimens from 923 pregnant women were tested to determine the status of GBS colonization, by CDC’s recommended culture method (including selective LIM broth) with a Granada agar (GR) added as well as by the IDI and the immunologic StrepB OIATM test (OIA), BioStar. The performance of the different methods was compared. Results: GBS were recovered from 16.8% and 23.6% specimens respectively on primary culture plates and overall. The colonization rate for GBS was 18.6 % by IDI and 15.7 % by OIA testing. The sensitivity of IDI for identifying vaginal colonization status at delivery was 92 % or 77.1 % when compared to GR primary cultures or to overall culture results, and for the OIA, it was respectively 65.1 or 52.1 %. The specificity was 99.1 % for IDI and 95.5 % for OIA. The turnaround time for obtaining results was less than one hour for both IDI and OIA. Conclusions: 1) Strep B-IDI test, performed on intrapartum vaginal specimens, yields relevant results rapidly enough to be used as an efficient diagnostic tool for the identification of GBS colonized women, in order to offer IAP really targeted to GBS carriers. 2) By comparison to the prenatal screening-based strategy, the high sensitivity and specificity of IDI would allow a reduction of useless IAP and of missed opportunities. 3) IDI testing might be implemented “in routine” in some hospitals for further clinical and practical evaluation. [less ▲]

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See detailEvaluation of the group B differential agar for the detection of group B streptococci from vaginal specimens
MELIN, Pierrette ULg; Rodriguez Cuns, Grisel; Lorquet, Sophie et al

in American Society of Microbiology (Ed.) Program and Abstracts of the 104th General Meeting of the American Society for Microbiology (2004, May)

Background Group B streptococci (GBS) are the leading cause of severe perinatal infections. Most current guidelines for the prevention of GBS perinatal disease are based on prenatal screening culture for ... [more ▼]

Background Group B streptococci (GBS) are the leading cause of severe perinatal infections. Most current guidelines for the prevention of GBS perinatal disease are based on prenatal screening culture for vaginal GBS colonisation. Use of selective and differential media could improve the sensitivity of these cultures. Objective To evaluate the GBS-Differential Agar (GBSDA) recently formulated by Becton Dickinson for the selective growth and production of orange colonies of b- hemolytic (b-H) GBS. Methods 283 vaginal swabs (VAG) collected from pregnant women were inoculated in selective Lim broth. After overnight incubation, Lim broth were subcultured on GBSDA, on Granada agar (Biomedics, Spain) and on Columbia blood agar (BA). To evaluate the stability, 99 isolates of GBS (REF) from adult or neonatal infections (Belgian GBS reference laboratory collection) were cultured on GBSDA and Granada at their limit of expiration, and on BA. GBSDA and Granada were incubated anaerobically and BA aerobically + 7% CO2, at 35°C, 24 to 48 h. Positive and negative control strains (GBS ; E. faecalis) were cultured with each run. Specific identification of colonies suggestive of GBS (pale to dark orange on GBSDA and Granada, b-H on BA) was performed. Results b-H GBS were recovered from 63 VAG (22.3 %): 62 were easily identified after overnight incubation on GBSDA and 63 on Granada without requiring any subculture. All GBS were also recovered from BA however it was after many subcultures. All orange colonies were confirmed as GBS. Among REF, 3 strains were non hemolytic ; they grew but were not differentiated as orange colonies on GBSDA or Granada. 96 REF were b-H, 94 (97.9%) produced orange to very dark orange colonies on GBSDA, 2 produced white colonies, and on Granada, 74 (77.1 %) produced pale to dark orange colonies and 22 white to white-orange colonies. Conclusion 1) GBSDA and Granada: a) very high sensitivity and specificity for the detection of b-H GBS, in a single step b) Results available within 48 h after inoculation in Lim broth, low workload 2) Excellent stability up to expiration date for GBSDA 3) Non hemolytic GBS: grown but not differentiated on GBSDA or Granada. [less ▲]

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