References of "Lognay, Georges"
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See detailDo aphids actively search for ant partners?
Fischer, Christophe ULg; Vanderplanck, Maryse; Lognay, Georges ULg et al

in Insect Science (in press)

The aphid–ant mutualistic relationships are not necessarily obligate for neither partners but evidence is that such interactions provide them strong advantages in terms of global fitness. While it is ... [more ▼]

The aphid–ant mutualistic relationships are not necessarily obligate for neither partners but evidence is that such interactions provide them strong advantages in terms of global fitness. While it is largely assumed that ants actively search for their mutualistic partners namely using volatile cues; whether winged aphids (i.e. aphids’ most mobile form) are able to select ant-frequented areas had not been investigated so far. Ant-frequented sites would indeed offer several advantages for these aphids including a lower predation pressure through ant presence and enhanced chances of establishing mutuaslistic interactions with neighbour ant colonies. In the field, aphid colonies are often observed in higher densities around ant nests, which is probably linked to a better survival ensured by ants’ services. Nevertheless, this could also result from a preferential establishment of winged aphids in ant-frequented areas. We tested this last hypothesis through different ethological assays and show that the facultative myrmecophilous black bean aphid, Aphis fabae L., does not orientate its search for a host plant preferentially towards ant-frequented plants. However our results suggest that ants reduce the number of winged aphids leaving the newly colonized plant. Thus, ants involved in facultative myrmecophilous interactions with aphids appear to contribute to structure aphid populations in the field by ensuring a better establishment and survival of newly established colonies rather than by inducing a deliberate plant selection by aphid partners based on the proximity of ant colonies. [less ▲]

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See detailMinerals and trace elements in traditional foods of rural areas of Lhasa Prefecture, Tibet Autonomous Region (P.R. China)
DERMIENCE, Michael ULg; Li, Xiao Wei; Mathieu, Françoise et al

in Journal of Food Composition and Analysis (2014), 35(2),

Traditional foods play a major role in the diet of rural people living in the Tibet Autonomous Region of the People's Republic of China. Because these foods are mainly derived from local agriculture as ... [more ▼]

Traditional foods play a major role in the diet of rural people living in the Tibet Autonomous Region of the People's Republic of China. Because these foods are mainly derived from local agriculture as well as artisanal production, their mineral composition may show significant discrepancies when compared with food composition data. This study aims at providing relevant data on the mineral composition of the main Tibetan foods. Sixteen different foodstuffs were sampled, including water, concentrated brewed black tea, chang, tsampa, wheat flour, dried cheese, dried yak meat, dried mutton, blood sausage, dried wild peaches, dried Chinese radish, and dried nettles. They were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for 19 minerals: Na, K, P, Ca, Mg, Fe, Zn, Mn, Cu, Ni, Se, Mo, Al, As, Cr, Co, Cd, Pb, and V. The validity of the results was ensured by the use of standard reference materials. A statistical comparison of the mean mineral contents of the analyzed foods against food composition data from the China Food Composition (CFC) table was carried out. It revealed significant discrepancies, emphasizing the importance of food analysis for nutritional assessment in Tibet autonomous region. To the best of our knowledge, the mineral compositions of some traditional Tibetan foods are here reported for the first time. [less ▲]

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See detailDétermination de la teneur en équol dans les laits commercialisés en Wallonie (Belgique)
Daems, Frédéric ULg; Jasselette, Christophe; Franckson, Delphine et al

Poster (2014, June 13)

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See detailThe composition of cuticular compounds indicates body parts, sex and age in the model butterfly Bicyclus anynana (Lepidoptera)
Heuskin, Stéphanie ULg; Vanderplanck, Maryse; Bacquet, Paul et al

in Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution (2014), 2:37

Chemical communication in insects’ sexual interactions is well-known to involve olfaction of volatile compounds called sex pheromones. In theory, sexual chemical communication may also involve chemicals ... [more ▼]

Chemical communication in insects’ sexual interactions is well-known to involve olfaction of volatile compounds called sex pheromones. In theory, sexual chemical communication may also involve chemicals with low or no volatility exchanged during precopulatory gustatory contacts. Yet, knowledge on this latter type of chemicals is so far mostly restricted to the Drosophila fly model. Here we provide the most comprehensive characterization to date of the cuticular chemical profile, including both volatile and non-volatile compounds, of a model butterfly, Bicyclus anynana. First, we characterized the body distribution of 103 cuticular lipids, mostly alkanes and methyl-branched alkanes, by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Second, we developed a multivariate statistical approach to cope with such complex chemical profiles and showed that variation in the presence or abundance of a subset of the cuticular lipids indicated body parts, and traits involved in B. anynana mate choice, namely sex and age. Third, we identified the chemical structure of the 20 most indicative compounds, which were on average more abundant (1346.4 ± 1994.6 ng; mean ± SD) than other, likely less indicative, compounds (225.9 ± 507.2 ng; mean ± SD). Fourth, we showed that wings and legs displayed most of the chemical information found on the entire body of the butterflies. Fifth, we showed that non-random gustatory contacts occurred between specific male and female body parts during courtship. The body parts mostly touched by the conspecific displayed the largest between-sex differentiation in cuticular composition. Altogether, the large diversity of cuticular lipids in B. anynana, which exceeds the one of Drosophila flies, and its non-random distribution and evaluation across individuals, together suggest that gustatory information is likely exchanged during sexual interactions in Lepidoptera. [less ▲]

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See detailIs conspecific substrate marking a long-term external memory of previously colonized overwintering sites in Harmonia axyridis?
Durieux, Delphine ULg; Fassotte, Bérénice ULg; Vanderplanck, Maryse et al

in Journal of Applied Entomology (2014), 138(5), 338-345

The multicoloured Asian ladybeetle, Harmonia axyridis (Pallas), aggregates inside dwellings during winters to survive the cold. This beetle uses chemical cues coming from congeners to select an ... [more ▼]

The multicoloured Asian ladybeetle, Harmonia axyridis (Pallas), aggregates inside dwellings during winters to survive the cold. This beetle uses chemical cues coming from congeners to select an overwintering site. Recent research has shown that they preferentially gather at places where conspecifics previously laid a substrate marking made up of saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons. Some authors have reported that H. axyridis colonizes the same overwintering sites from 1 year to another. Herein, the hypothesis that this substrate marking is used by H. axyridis to settle in the same aggregation sites from one winter to another was tested. To this aim, the temporal modification in the chemical profile of the hydrocarbon marking was studied by performing chromatographic analyses. After 1 year, the overall profile was modified qualitatively and quantitatively: the unsaturated hydrocarbons were no longer detected while some saturated hydrocarbons were still present in large quantities. In a behavioural assay conducted in the laboratory, the 12-month-old marking did not induce the aggregation of H. axyridis. This result indicates that the chemical markings left by conspecifics during a previous aggregation period in an overwintering site are not sufficient to induce the gathering of the newly arriving individuals. [less ▲]

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See detailTemperature regimes and aphid density interactions differentially influence VOC emissions in Arabidopsis
Hien, Truong Thi Dieu ULg; Delory, Benjamin ULg; Vanderplanck, Maryse et al

in Arthropod-Plant Interactions (2014)

The effects of volatile emissions from plants exposed to individual abiotic and biotic stresses are well documented. However, the influence of multiple stresses on plant photosynthesis and defense ... [more ▼]

The effects of volatile emissions from plants exposed to individual abiotic and biotic stresses are well documented. However, the influence of multiple stresses on plant photosynthesis and defense responses, resulting in a variety of volatile profiles has received little attention. In this study, we investigated how temperature regimes in the presence and absence of the sucking insect Myzus persicae affected volatile organic compound emissions in Arabidopsis over three time periods (0-24 h, 24-48 h, and 48-72 h). Headspace solid-phase microextraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to evaluate Arabidopsis volatile organic compounds. The results showed that under laboratory conditions, eight volatile classes [alcohols (mainly 2-ethyl-hexan-1-ol), ketone (6-methyl hept-5-en-2-one), esters (mainly (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate), aldehydes (mainly phenylacetaldehyde), isothiocyanates (mainly 4-methylpentyl isothiocyanate), terpenes (mainly (E,E)-α-farnesene), nitrile (5-(methylthio) pentanenitrile), and sulfide (dimethyl trisulfide)] were observed on plants exposed to stress combinations, whereas emissions of six volatile classes were observed during temperature stress treatments alone (with the exception of nitriles and sulfides). Aphid density at high temperature combinations resulted in significantly higher isothiocyanate, ester, nitrile and sulfide proportions. The results of the present study provide an insight into the effects of temperature - aphid interactions on plant volatile emissions. [less ▲]

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See detailMealworms: Alternate Source of Lipids
Danthine, Sabine ULg; Blecker, Christophe ULg; Paul, Aman ULg et al

Scientific conference (2014, May 16)

The aim of present study was to determine the physicochemical properties of the oil obtained from Tenebrio molitor larvae (mealworms) and explore its potential as edible oil. Five batches of Tenebrio ... [more ▼]

The aim of present study was to determine the physicochemical properties of the oil obtained from Tenebrio molitor larvae (mealworms) and explore its potential as edible oil. Five batches of Tenebrio molitor larvae were investigated for their lipid content and physiochemical properties. Three batches were reared in lab (3 different productions) and two were purchased from a local supplier. The lipids were extracted using a cold extraction technique employing 2:1 ratio chloroform/methanol as solvent. The fatty acid profile was determined using gas chromatography and triacylglycerol profile using HPLC. The thermal properties of the lipid extracts were also analyzed using differential scanning calorimetry. All the samples contained high amount of unsaturated fatty acids. The chemical composition and the thermal properties of the samples varied with the source. With this quantity and quality of lipid content, mealworms offer potential as an important source of edible lipids. [less ▲]

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See detailBelgian Grasshoppers: A Nutritious Food Source
Paul, Aman ULg; Frederich, Michel ULg; Blecker, Christophe ULg et al

Poster (2014, May 14)

Rapid urbanization and rising economies are creating shifts in the composition of global food demand, so it is necessary to explore new sources of food with better nutritional profile. Among the ... [more ▼]

Rapid urbanization and rising economies are creating shifts in the composition of global food demand, so it is necessary to explore new sources of food with better nutritional profile. Among the alternative food that exists are the grasshoppers, about 80 species of which are consumed worldwide. Grasshoppers are not only rich source of proteins and lipids but also some important minor component like vitamins and minerals. Edible species of grasshopper in Belgium were identified and attempts were made for the lab rearing of meadow grasshopper (Chorthippus parallelus). The lipids as well as protein contents of meadow grasshopper (Chorthippus parallelus) & long winged conehead (Conocephalus discolor) were investigated. The fatty acid compositions of these two species were determined by gas chromatography. Some of the physicochemical properties of the lipids extracted were also analyzed. These two grasshopper species could be really nutritious source of food. [less ▲]

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See detailFirst evidence of a volatile sex pheromone in the invasive Harmonia axyridis (Pallas) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)
Fassotte, Bérénice ULg; Fischer, Christophe ULg; Durieux, Delphine ULg et al

Conference (2014, April 02)

Data about sex pheromones, or any semiochemicals that play a role in Coccinellid mating, remain limited. Since years, various studies and behavioral observations have hypothesized that such molecules are ... [more ▼]

Data about sex pheromones, or any semiochemicals that play a role in Coccinellid mating, remain limited. Since years, various studies and behavioral observations have hypothesized that such molecules are involved in sexual communication of ladybeetles. In this study, we collected volatile organic compounds released by virgin females of the multicolored Asian ladybeetle, Harmonia axyridis (Pallas), which were either allowed or not allowed to feed on aphids. In the presence of aphids, virgin females exhibited “calling behavior”, which has been associated with the emission of a sex pheromone in several Coleoptera species. Bioassays showed that these females released a blend of volatile compounds that is involved in the attraction of males. Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry analyses highlighted specific volatile cues emanating from females, whereas males did not produce these compounds. Five components were identified: (–)-β-caryophyllene, β elemene, methyl-eugenol, α humulene, and α bulnesene. All compounds were produced after virgin females were fed aphids, and their quantity increased across the experimental period. The results confirm that female H. axyridis produce a volatile sex pheromone. Therefore, this study provides important biological information that could promote the development of efficient pest control management methods to manipulate the movements of this invasive ladybeetle, and to reduce its negative impacts on biodiversity. [less ▲]

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See detailA pheromone-based formulation against phytophagous pests
Fassotte, Bérénice ULg; Vandereycken, Axel ULg; Heuskin, Stéphanie ULg et al

Poster (2014, April 02)

Innovative integrated pest management methods are needed to overcome market withdrawal of synthetic pesticides. Therefore, the identification of environment-friendly bio-products carrying direct or ... [more ▼]

Innovative integrated pest management methods are needed to overcome market withdrawal of synthetic pesticides. Therefore, the identification of environment-friendly bio-products carrying direct or indirect biocide activity is one promising alternative option. Our researches focus on the identification of appropriate formulations releasing volatile organic compounds that are attractive for natural enemies of insect pests. However, the elaboration of slow-release devices that ensure stable and controlled release of active volatile compounds is quite challenging. Here, we developed a formulation based on E-β-farnesene and (–)-β-caryophyllene, these two semiochemicals having strong attractive potential on aphid natural enemies including ladybeetles and hoverflies. Both compounds were encapsulated together in alginate gel beads. The blend efficiency is currently being evaluated through laboratory and field assays. [less ▲]

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See detailChemical analyses of the seeds from Prunella vulgaris: A chemotaxonomic approach
Paul, Aman ULg; Frederich, Michel ULg; Cieckiewicz, Ewa ULg et al

Poster (2014, April)

Common self-heal (Prunella vulgaris) plants are traditionally sown along the border of crops to enhance the biodiversity. Besides enhancing the biodiversity, they can also be a source of interesting ... [more ▼]

Common self-heal (Prunella vulgaris) plants are traditionally sown along the border of crops to enhance the biodiversity. Besides enhancing the biodiversity, they can also be a source of interesting compounds which could be important for food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. The seeds of Common Yarrow were investigated for proteins, fatty acid compositions and polyphenolic compounds. The protein content was analyzed according to Dumas method, the extraction of oil was done using a cold extraction technique employing 2:1 chloroform/methanol as solvent, the fatty acid composition was determined using the gas chromatography and the amount of polyphenolic compounds were estimated using the method as described in European Pharmacopoeia, 8th edition. Common self-heal seeds can be of great commercial importance. [less ▲]

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See detailSome Interesting Sources of Plant Seed Oil
Paul, Aman ULg; Danthine, Sabine ULg; Blecker, Christophe ULg et al

Poster (2014, March 05)

There is a growing realization worldwide that biodiversity is fundamental to agricultural production and food security, as well as a valuable ingredient of environmental conservation. Flowering strips ... [more ▼]

There is a growing realization worldwide that biodiversity is fundamental to agricultural production and food security, as well as a valuable ingredient of environmental conservation. Flowering strips around the border of the crops serves as an important function to improve the biodiversity, besides this they play a major role in the ruminant nutrition and serve as a source of numerous beneficial compounds. It is well known that seeds store their food reserves for next generation mainly in the form of lipids; some of the seeds from these flowering strips could be an interesting source of lipids. These seed oils could play important role in food, pharmaceutical, cosmetics and other industries. The extraction of seed oil from four such plant species in Belgium namely Oregano (Origanum vulgare), Yellow Bedstraw (Galium verum), Common Self-heal (Prunella vulgaris) & Purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria) was carried out. Extraction was done by a cold extraction technique using chloroform/methanol in 2:1 ratio as solvent. Amount of oil extracted from Oregano, Yellow Bedstraw, Common Self-heal and Purple loosestrife was 22.58±0.03 %, 3.28±0.01 %, 14.84±0.12 % & 20.32±0.15 %. The fatty acid profiles of these four species were determined by gas chromatography (using methyl esters of their fatty acids); Oleic acid and Linoleic acid were found in all the four species, Gamma-linolenic acid was found in Purple loosestrife & Alpha-linolenic acid was found in Oregano and Common Self-heal plant species. Thermal behaviour of these four plant seed oils were analyzed using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), while some other physicochemical properties of the seed oils were also analyzed. These plant seed oils can be of great commercial importance. [less ▲]

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See detailField bordering flower strips as source of lipids
Paul, Aman ULg; Danthine, Sabine ULg; Stephanie, Heuskin et al

Poster (2014, February 07)

Field bordering flower strips not just only improves the biodiversity but also serves as a source of beneficial compounds. Some of the plants in these strips can be really interesting source of lipids ... [more ▼]

Field bordering flower strips not just only improves the biodiversity but also serves as a source of beneficial compounds. Some of the plants in these strips can be really interesting source of lipids, the oils extracted from their seeds can be important for food, pharmaceutical and cosmetics industries. Six species of plants from flowering strips in Belgium were investigated for their seed oil content. The oil from seeds was extracted by cold extraction technique using chloroform/methanol in 2:1 ratio as solvent. Oil extraction from seeds of Red Clover (Trifolium pratense), Rough Hawkbit (Leontodon hispidus), Cow Parsley (Anthriscus sylvestris), St John’s Wort (Hypericum perforatum), Common Yarrow (Achillea millefollium) and Birdsfoot Trefoil (Lotus corniculatus) plant species was done on wet weight which came out to be 7.89±0.11%, 11.86±0.07%, 14.78±0.31%, 24.20±0.02%, 20.08±0.15% and 7.04±0.12% respectively. The physicochemical properties of the extracted oils were analyzed. Some of these oils can be of great commercial value. [less ▲]

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See detailCan phytoestrogen-rich plants restore the image of livestock in terms of human health? Do they promise a differentiated quality products chain?
Daems, Frédéric ULg; Jasselette, Christophe; Lognay, Georges ULg et al

Poster (2014, February 07)

In a project named PhytoHealth, the development of analytical methods for studying the impact of phytoestrogens rich diet on the «health value» of animal products is in progress. Despite the ambiguous ... [more ▼]

In a project named PhytoHealth, the development of analytical methods for studying the impact of phytoestrogens rich diet on the «health value» of animal products is in progress. Despite the ambiguous image that have phytoestrogens, some of their metabolites seemed to have potentially beneficial effects to human health. In a first time, a microbial metabolite (equol) was selected and its metabolism in dairy cow is studied. A first method using the UPLC®-MS/MS technology has been validated and has achieved a screening of equol content in milk consumed in Wallonia. Equol was found in all milk samples analyzed and a significant difference between farming methods has been highlighted. A second analytical method to quantify the equol precursors was then developed and a study of forage plants consumed by Belgian dairy cows will be conducted to select the richest fodder varieties. Other methods will be developed to better understand the metabolism in the cow and estimate the impact of enriched milk on human health. An original approach involving the use of minipigs will be considered. In the end, creating of a differentiated quality animal products chain could be interesting for the consumer, but also recoverable for the producer. [less ▲]

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See detailA New Method for the Determination of Cyanide Ions and Their Quantification in Some Senegalese Cassava Varieties
Diallo, Younoussa; Gueye, Momar Talla; Ndiaye, Cheikh et al

in American Journal of Analytical Chemistry (2014), 5(3), 181-187

Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is a starchy staple food that previous researches have showed to contain cyanogenic compounds, precursors of hydrocyanic acid, undoubtedly toxic for humans. With the aim ... [more ▼]

Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is a starchy staple food that previous researches have showed to contain cyanogenic compounds, precursors of hydrocyanic acid, undoubtedly toxic for humans. With the aim to determine food security in cassava, this study developed a simple, fast and less expensive step for quantifying cyanide ions by using micro-diffusion with modified Conway cells. After an enzymatic degradation, the cyanide ions were quantified by electrochemical procedures. The validation of this method is estimated. The concentration of cyanide ions at different part of the samples was determined. The results showed high toxicity in some fresh Senegalese consumed cassava varieties (>100 mg HCN·kg﹣1). However, in the processed cassava products, less than 10 mg HCN·kg﹣1 was found in the different varieties studied except for the chips where the levels of CN﹣ contents were important (>49 mg HCN·kg﹣1). [less ▲]

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See detailTechnologie de production de masse d’insectes - INSECTECH
Richard, Gaetan ULg; Hance, Thierry; Fauconnier, Marie-Laure ULg et al

Report (2014)

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See detailIdentification of 1-methyloctyl butanoate as the major sex pheromone component from females of the saddle gall midge, Haplodiplosis marginata (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae)
Censier, Florence ULg; Fischer, Christophe ULg; Pascal, Laurent et al

in Chemoecology (2014)

The saddle gall midge, Haplodiplosis marginata (von Roser) (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae), has undergone a resurgence recently as a pest of cereals in Belgium and other European countries. An effective ... [more ▼]

The saddle gall midge, Haplodiplosis marginata (von Roser) (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae), has undergone a resurgence recently as a pest of cereals in Belgium and other European countries. An effective monitoring tool of saddle gall midge flights is needed in order to understand the enigmatic population dynamics of this pest, and to design an integrated management strategy. Therefore, volatile compounds emitted by females (alkan-2-ols and alk-2-yl butanoates) were identified, and the chirality of the emitted esters was determined to be the R absolute configuration. In field-trapping experiments, racemic non-2-yl butanoate attracted substantial numbers of H. marginata males. Thus, this compound will be useful in baited traps for monitoring seasonal flight patterns, and improving integrated management of the saddle gall midge in agricultural systems. [less ▲]

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See detailRole of larval host plant experience and solanaceous plant volatile emissions in Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae) host finding behavior
Caparros Megido, Rudy ULg; De Backer, Lara; Ettaïb, Refki et al

in Arthropod-Plant Interactions (2014)

The tomato leafminer, Tuta absoluta (Lepi- doptera: Gelechiidae), is considered to be a major pest that damages tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L; Solanaceae) crops in South American, European, and ... [more ▼]

The tomato leafminer, Tuta absoluta (Lepi- doptera: Gelechiidae), is considered to be a major pest that damages tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L; Solanaceae) crops in South American, European, and Mediterranean countries. This insect species is polyphagous (i.e., feeds on many types of food); hence, it could also develop on other cultivated host plants, principally solanaceous plants, such as potato (S. tuberosum L.; Solanaceae) and eggplant (S. melongena L.; Solanaceae). Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that host plant choice by adult T. absoluta is influenced by plant volatile organic compounds and larval host plant experience. One tomato cultivar (cv.) ‘Money- maker’ and three potato cv. ‘Charlotte’ ‘Bintje,’ and ‘Nicola’ were tested. Using a flying tunnel, we observed that females reared on tomato preferred flying toward tomato and, to a lesser extent, potato cv. ‘Charlotte.’ These preferences might be explained by the high release of terpenes by these two plants. When conducting oviposition choice assays, we found no preference between tomato and potato in the number of eggs laid by females that had been previously reared on either host plant. This study indicates that the host finding behavior of T. absoluta is mediated by solanaceous volatiles, while oviposition behavior appears to depend on additional stimuli. These results provide baseline information for use in the development of new control strategies against T. absoluta using semiochemicals and plant breeding. [less ▲]

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