References of "Loeillet, B"
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See detailSpin-orbit angle measurements for six southern transiting planets. New insights into the dynamical origins of hot Jupiters
Triaud, A H M J; Collier Cameron, A.; Queloz, D. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2010), 524

Context. Several competing scenarios for planetary-system formation and evolution seek to explain how hot Jupiters came to be so close to their parent stars. Most planetary parameters evolve with time ... [more ▼]

Context. Several competing scenarios for planetary-system formation and evolution seek to explain how hot Jupiters came to be so close to their parent stars. Most planetary parameters evolve with time, making it hard to distinguish between models. The obliquity of an orbit with respect to the stellar rotation axis is thought to be more stable than other parameters such as eccentricity. Most planets, to date, appear aligned with the stellar rotation axis; the few misaligned planets so far detected are massive (> 2 M[SUB]J[/SUB]). <BR /> Aims: Our goal is to measure the degree of alignment between planetary orbits and stellar spin axes, to search for potential correlations with eccentricity or other planetary parameters and to measure long term radial velocity variability indicating the presence of other bodies in the system. <BR /> Methods: For transiting planets, the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect allows the measurement of the sky-projected angle β between the stellar rotation axis and a planet's orbital axis. Using the HARPS spectrograph, we observed the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect for six transiting hot Jupiters found by the WASP consortium. We combine these with long term radial velocity measurements obtained with CORALIE. We used a combined analysis of photometry and radial velocities, fitting model parameters with the Markov Chain Monte Carlo method. After obtaining β we attempt to statistically determine the distribution of the real spin-orbit angle ψ. <BR /> Results: We found that three of our targets have β above 90°: WASP-2b: β = 153°[SUP]+11[/SUP][SUB]-15[/SUB], WASP-15b: β = 139.6°[SUP]+5.2[/SUP][SUB]-4.3[/SUB] and WASP-17b: β = 148.5°[SUP]+5.1[/SUP][SUB]-4.2[/SUB]; the other three (WASP-4b, WASP-5b and WASP-18b) have angles compatible with 0°. We find no dependence between the misaligned angle and planet mass nor with any other planetary parameter. All six orbits are close to circular, with only one firm detection of eccentricity e = 0.00848[SUP]+0.00085[/SUP][SUB]-0.00095[/SUB] in WASP-18b. No long-term radial acceleration was detected for any of the targets. Combining all previous 20 measurements of β and our six and transforming them into a distribution of ψ we find that between about 45 and 85% of hot Jupiters have ψ > 30°. <BR /> Conclusions: Most hot Jupiters are misaligned, with a large variety of spin-orbit angles. We find observations and predictions using the Kozai mechanism match well. If these observational facts are confirmed in the future, we may then conclude that most hot Jupiters are formed from a dynamical and tidal origin without the necessity to use type I or II migration. At present, standard disc migration cannot explain the observations without invoking at least another additional process. Using observations with the high resolution échelle spectrograph HARPS mounted on the ESO 3.6 m (under proposals 072.C-0488, 082.C-0040 & 283.C-5017), and with the high resolution échelle spectrograph CORALIE on the 1.2 m Euler Swiss Telescope, both installed at the ESO La Silla Observatory in Chile.RV data is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via <A href="http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/524/A25">http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/524/A25</A> [less ▲]

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See detailPlanetary transit candidates in the CoRoT initial run: resolving their nature
Moutou, C.; Pont, F.; Bouchy, F. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2009), 506

With the release of CoRoT lightcurves of the Initial Run IRa01, 50 transiting planetary candidates have been published in a companion paper. About twenty of them were identified as binary stars from the ... [more ▼]

With the release of CoRoT lightcurves of the Initial Run IRa01, 50 transiting planetary candidates have been published in a companion paper. About twenty of them were identified as binary stars from the CoRoT lightcurve itself. Complementary observations were conducted for 29 candidates, including ground-based photometry and radial-velocity measurements. Two giant planets were identified and fully characterized. Nineteen binaries are recognized, from which 10 are background eclipsing binaries in the CoRoT mask or triple systems, diluted by the main CoRoT target. Eight cases remain of unclear origin, one of them still being a planetary candidate. Comparison with simulations shows that the actual threshold of confirmed planet detection in this field does not yet fulfill the expectations, and a number of reasons are invoked, like the ranking process based on lightcurve analyses, and the strategy and limits of follow-up observations for targets fainter than magnitude 15. Based on data obtained at Observatoire de Haute Provence with SOPHIE and with HARPS on the ESO 3.6 m telescope at La Silla Observatory. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27th 2006, has been developed and is operated by CNES, with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brazil , ESA (RSSD and Science Programme), Germany and Spain. Tables 2 to 13, 15 to 17 and Figs. 4 to 7 are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org [less ▲]

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See detailRate and nature of false positives in the CoRoT exoplanet search
Almenara, J. M.; Deeg, H. J.; Aigrain, S. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2009), 506

Context: The CoRoT satellite searches for planets by applying the transit method, monitoring up to 12 000 stars in the galactic plane for 150 days in each observing run. This search is contaminated by a ... [more ▼]

Context: The CoRoT satellite searches for planets by applying the transit method, monitoring up to 12 000 stars in the galactic plane for 150 days in each observing run. This search is contaminated by a large fraction of false positives, caused by different eclipsing binary configurations that might be confused with a transiting planet. <BR />Aims: We evaluate the rates and nature of false positives in the CoRoT exoplanets search and compare our results with semiempirical predictions. <BR />Methods: We consider the detected binary and planet candidates in the first three extended CoRoT runs, and classify the results of the follow-up observations completed to verify their planetary nature. We group the follow-up results into undiluted binaries, diluted binaries, and planets and compare their abundances with predictions from the literature. <BR />Results: 83% of the initial detections are classified as false positives using only the CoRoT light-curves, the remaining 17% require follow-up observations. Finally, 12% of the candidates in the follow-up program are planets. The shape of the overall distribution of the false positive rate follows previous predictions, except for candidates with transit depths below about 0.4%. For candidates with transit depths in the range from 0.1-0.4%, CoRoT detections are nearly complete, and this difference from predictions is probably real and dominated by a lower than expected abundance of diluted eclipsing binaries. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27th 2006, has been developed and is operated by CNES, with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brazil , ESA (RSSD and Science Programme), Germany and Spain. [less ▲]

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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission VIII. CoRoT-7b: the first Super-Earth with measured radius
Leger, A.; Rouan, D.; Schneider, J. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2009), 506

We report the discovery of very shallow (DF/F = 3.4 10-4), periodic dips in the light curve of an active V = 11.7 G9V star observed by the CoRoT satellite, which we interpret as due to the presence of a ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of very shallow (DF/F = 3.4 10-4), periodic dips in the light curve of an active V = 11.7 G9V star observed by the CoRoT satellite, which we interpret as due to the presence of a transiting companion. We describe the 3-colour CoRoT data and complementary ground-based observations that support the planetary nature of the companion. Methods. We use CoRoT color information, good angular resolution ground-based photometric observations in- and out- of transit, adaptive optics imaging, near-infrared spectroscopy and preliminary results from Radial Velocity measurements, to test the diluted eclipsing binary scenarios. The parameters of the host star are derived from optical spectra, which were then combined with the CoRoT light curve to derive parameters of the companion. We examine carefully all conceivable cases of false positives, and all tests performed support the planetary hypothesis. Blends with separation larger than 0.40 arcsec or triple systems are almost excluded with a 8 10-4 risk left. We conclude that, as far as we have been exhaustive, we have discovered a planetary companion, named CoRoT-7b, for which we derive a period of 0.853 59 +/- 3 10-5 day and a radius of Rp = 1.68 +/- 0.09 REarth. Analysis of preliminary radial velocity data yields an upper limit of 21 MEarth for the companion mass, supporting the finding. CoRoT-7b is very likely the first Super-Earth with a measured radius. [less ▲]

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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission . VI. CoRoT-Exo-3b: the first secure inhabitant of the brown-dwarf desert
Deleuil, M.; Deeg, H. J.; Alonso, R. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2008), 491

Context: The CoRoT space mission routinely provides high-precision photometric measurements of thousands of stars that have been continuously observed for months. Aims: The discovery and characterization ... [more ▼]

Context: The CoRoT space mission routinely provides high-precision photometric measurements of thousands of stars that have been continuously observed for months. Aims: The discovery and characterization of the first very massive transiting planetary companion with a short orbital period is reported. Methods: A series of 34 transits was detected in the CoRoT light curve of an F3V star, observed from May to October 2007 for 152 days. The radius was accurately determined and the mass derived for this new transiting, thanks to the combined analysis of the light curve and complementary ground-based observations: high-precision radial-velocity measurements, on-off photometry, and high signal-to-noise spectroscopic observations. Results: CoRoT-Exo-3b has a radius of 1.01 ± 0.07 R_Jup and transits around its F3-type primary every 4.26 days in a synchronous orbit. Its mass of 21.66 ± 1.0 M_Jup, density of 26.4 ± 5.6 g cm[SUP]-3[/SUP], and surface gravity of logg = 4.72 clearly distinguish it from the regular close-in planet population, making it the most intriguing transiting substellar object discovered so far. Conclusions: With the current data, the nature of CoRoT-Exo-3b is ambiguous, as it could either be a low-mass brown-dwarf or a member of a new class of ``superplanets''. Its discovery may help constrain the evolution of close-in planets and brown-dwarfs better. Finally, CoRoT-Exo-3b confirms the trend that massive transiting giant planets (M >= 4 M_Jup) are found preferentially around more massive stars than the Sun. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27th 2006, has been developed and is operating by CNES, with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brasil, ESA, Germany and Spain. The first CoRoT data will be available to the public in February 2009 from the CoRoT archive: http://idoc-corot.ias.u-psud.fr/ Table of the COROT photometry is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/491/889 [less ▲]

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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission. V. CoRoT-Exo-4b: stellar and planetary parameters
Moutou, C.; Bruntt, H.; Guillot, T. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2008), 488

Aims. The CoRoT satellite has announced its fourth transiting planet (Aigrain et al. 2008, A&A, 488, L43) with space photometry. We describe and analyse complementary observations of this system performed ... [more ▼]

Aims. The CoRoT satellite has announced its fourth transiting planet (Aigrain et al. 2008, A&A, 488, L43) with space photometry. We describe and analyse complementary observations of this system performed to establish the planetary nature of the transiting body and to estimate the fundamental parameters of the planet and its parent star. Methods: We have analysed high precision radial-velocity data, ground-based photometry, and high signal-to-noise ratio spectroscopy. Results: The parent star CoRoT-Exo-4 (2MASS 06484671-0040219) is a late F-type star of mass of 1.16 M[SUB]o[/SUB] and radius of 1.17 R[SUB]o[/SUB]. The planet has a circular orbit with a period of 9.20205 d. The planet radius is 1.19 R_Jup and the mass is 0.72 M_Jup. It is a gas-giant planet with a ``normal'' internal structure of mainly H and He. CoRoT-Exo-4b has the second longest period of the known transiting planets. It is an important discovery since it occupies an empty area in the mass-period diagram of transiting exoplanets. Based on observations obtained with CoRoT, a space project operated by the French Space Agency, CNES, with participation of the Science Programme of ESA, ESTEC/RSSD, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Germany and Spain; and on observations made with the SOPHIE spectrograph at Observatoire de Haute Provence, France (PNP.07B.MOUT), and the HARPS spectrograph at ESO La Silla Observatory (079.C-0127/F). Table 2 and Fig. 5 are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org [less ▲]

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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission. III. The spectroscopic transit of CoRoT-Exo-2b with SOPHIE and HARPS
Bouchy, F.; Queloz, D.; Deleuil, M. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2008), 482

We report on the spectroscopic transit of the massive hot-Jupiter CoRoT-Exo-2b observed with the high-precision spectrographs SOPHIE and HARPS. By modeling the radial velocity anomaly occurring during the ... [more ▼]

We report on the spectroscopic transit of the massive hot-Jupiter CoRoT-Exo-2b observed with the high-precision spectrographs SOPHIE and HARPS. By modeling the radial velocity anomaly occurring during the transit due to the Rossiter-McLaughlin (RM) effect, we determine the sky-projected angle between the stellar spin and the planetary orbital axis to be close to zero lambda = 7.2 ± 4.5 deg, and we secure the planetary nature of CoRoT-Exo-2b. We discuss the influence of the stellar activity on the RM modeling. Spectral analysis of the parent star from HARPS spectra are presented. Observations made with SOPHIE spectrograph at Observatoire de Haute Provence, France (PNP.07A.MOUT) and HARPS spectrograph at ESO La Silla Observatory (079.C-0127(F)). The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27th 2006, has been developed and is operated by CNES, with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brasil, ESA, Germany, and Spain. [less ▲]

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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission. II. CoRoT-Exo-2b: a transiting planet around an active G star
Alonso, R.; Auvergne, M.; Baglin, A. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2008), 482

Context: The CoRoT mission, a pioneer in exoplanet searches from space, has completed its first 150 days of continuous observations of ~12 000 stars in the galactic plane. An analysis of the raw data ... [more ▼]

Context: The CoRoT mission, a pioneer in exoplanet searches from space, has completed its first 150 days of continuous observations of ~12 000 stars in the galactic plane. An analysis of the raw data identifies the most promising candidates and triggers the ground-based follow-up. Aims: We report on the discovery of the transiting planet CoRoT-Exo-2b, with a period of 1.743 days, and characterize its main parameters. Methods: We filter the CoRoT raw light curve of cosmic impacts, orbital residuals, and low frequency signals from the star. The folded light curve of 78 transits is fitted to a model to obtain the main parameters. Radial velocity data obtained with the SOPHIE, CORALIE and HARPS spectrographs are combined to characterize the system. The 2.5 min binned phase-folded light curve is affected by the effect of sucessive occultations of stellar active regions by the planet, and the dispersion in the out of transit part reaches a level of 1.09×10[SUP]-4[/SUP] in flux units. Results: We derive a radius for the planet of 1.465 ± 0.029 R_Jup and a mass of 3.31 ± 0.16 M_Jup, corresponding to a density of 1.31 ± 0.04 g/cm^3. The large radius of CoRoT-Exo-2b cannot be explained by current models of evolution of irradiated planets. Based on observations obtained with CoRoT, a space project operated by the French Space Agency, CNES, with participation of the Science Programme of ESA, ESTEC/RSSD, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Germany and Spain; and on observations made with SOPHIE spectrograph at Observatoire de Haute Provence, France (PNP.07 A.MOUT), CORALIE, and HARPS spectrograph at ESO La Silla Observatroy (079.C-0127/F)). Table 2 is only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org [less ▲]

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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission. I. CoRoT-Exo-1b: a low-density short-period planet around a G0V star
Barge, P.; Baglin, A.; Auvergne, M. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2008), 482

Context: The pioneer space mission for photometric planet searches, CoRoT, steadily monitors about 12 000 stars in each of its fields of view. Transit candidates can be detected early in the processing of ... [more ▼]

Context: The pioneer space mission for photometric planet searches, CoRoT, steadily monitors about 12 000 stars in each of its fields of view. Transit candidates can be detected early in the processing of the data and before the end of a run of observation. Aims: We report the detection of the first planet discovered by CoRoT and characterizing it with the help of follow-up observations. Methods: Raw data were filtered from outliers and residuals at the orbital period of the satellite. The orbital parameters and the radius of the planet were estimated by best fitting the phase folded light curve with 34 successive transits. Doppler measurements with the SOPHIE spectrograph permitted us to secure the detection against binaries and to estimate the mass of the planet. Results: The accuracy of the data is very high with a dispersion in the 2.17 min binned phase-folded light curve that does not exceed ~3.×10[SUP]-4[/SUP] in flux unit. The planet orbits a mildly metal-poor G0V star of magnitude V=13.6 in 1.5 days. The estimated mass and radius of the star are 0.95±0.15 M[SUB]o[/SUB] and 1.11±0.05 R[SUB]o[/SUB]. We find the planet has a radius of 1.49±0.08 R_Jup, a mass of 1.03±0.12 M_Jup, and a particularly low mean density of 0.38±0.05 g cm[SUP]-3[/SUP]. The CoRoT space mission, launched on Dec. 27th, 2006, was developed and is operated by the CNES, with participation of the Science Program of ESA, ESTEC/RSSD, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Germany and Spain. Based in part on observations with the SOPHIE spectrograph at Obs. de Haute Provence, France. Table [see full text] is only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org Individual photometric measurements are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/482/L17 [less ▲]

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See detailFirst Results from SuperWASP
Street, R. A.; Collier Cameron, A.; Maxted, P. et al

in Transiting Extrapolar Planets Workshop (2007, July 01)

We present a summary of the first results from the SuperWASP survey, including the detection of two new transiting exoplanets. We summarize our candidate selection procedure and the process by which we ... [more ▼]

We present a summary of the first results from the SuperWASP survey, including the detection of two new transiting exoplanets. We summarize our candidate selection procedure and the process by which we eliminated many false positives prior to radial velocity observations carried out with the Sophie spectrograph at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence. These data confirmed the discovery of two new transiting hot Jupiters, while rejecting 23 other targets. The two confirmed planets, WASP-1b & WASP-2b, respectively orbit F7V and K1V host stars with periods of 2.52 days and 2.15 days. The mass of WASP-1b is constrained to the range 0.80-0.98 M_{Jup} and the planet appears to be `bloated' with a radius of at least 1.33 R_{Jup}. WASP-2b has a mass between 0.81-0.95 M_{Jup} and a radius in the range 0.65-1.26 R_{Jup}. [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-1b and WASP-2b: two new transiting exoplanets detected with SuperWASP and SOPHIE
Cameron, A Collier; Bouchy, F.; Hébrard, G. et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2007), 375

We have detected low-amplitude radial-velocity variations in two stars, USNO-B1.0 1219-0005465 (GSC 02265-00107 = WASP-1) and USNO-B1.0 0964-0543604 (GSC 00522-01199 = WASP-2). Both stars were identified ... [more ▼]

We have detected low-amplitude radial-velocity variations in two stars, USNO-B1.0 1219-0005465 (GSC 02265-00107 = WASP-1) and USNO-B1.0 0964-0543604 (GSC 00522-01199 = WASP-2). Both stars were identified as being likely host stars of transiting exoplanets in the 2004 SuperWASP wide-field transit survey. Using the newly commissioned radial-velocity spectrograph SOPHIE at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence, we found that both objects exhibit reflex orbital radial-velocity variations with amplitudes characteristic of planetary-mass companions and in-phase with the photometric orbits. Line-bisector studies rule out faint blended binaries as the cause of either the radial-velocity variations or the transits. We perform preliminary spectral analyses of the host stars, which together with their radial-velocity variations and fits to the transit light curves yield estimates of the planetary masses and radii. WASP-1b and WASP-2b have orbital periods of 2.52 and 2.15 d, respectively. Given mass estimates for their F7V and K1V primaries, we derive planet masses 0.80-0.98 and 0.81-0.95 times that of Jupiter, respectively. WASP-1b appears to have an inflated radius of at least 1.33 R[SUB]Jup[/SUB], whereas WASP-2b has a radius in the range 0.65-1.26 R[SUB]Jup[/SUB]. [less ▲]

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