References of "Lisein, Jonathan"
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See detailThe evaluation of unmanned aerial systems-based photogrammetry and terrestrial laser scanning to generate DEMs of agricultural watersheds
Ouedraogo, Mohamar ULg; Degré, Aurore ULg; Debouche, Charles ULg et al

in Geomorphology (2014)

Agricultural watersheds tend to be places of intensive farming activities that permanently modify their microtopography. The surface characteristics of the soil vary depending on the crops that are ... [more ▼]

Agricultural watersheds tend to be places of intensive farming activities that permanently modify their microtopography. The surface characteristics of the soil vary depending on the crops that are cultivated in these areas. Agricultural soil microtopography plays an important role in the quantification of runoff and sediment transport because the presence of crops, crop residues, furrows and ridges may impact the direction of water flow. To better assess such phenomena, 3-D reconstructions of high-resolution agricultural watershed topography is essential. Fine-resolution topographic data collection technologies can be used to discern highly detailed elevation variability in these areas. Knowledge of the strengths and weaknesses of existing technologies used for data collection on agricultural watersheds may be helpful in choosing an appropriate technology. This study assesses the suitability of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) and unmanned aerial system (UAS) photogrammetry for collecting the fine-resolution topographic data required to generate accurate, high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) in a small watershed area (12 ha). Because of farming activity, 14 TLS scans (≈ 25 points m− 2) were collected without using high-definition surveying (HDS) targets, which are generally used to mesh adjacent scans. To evaluate the accuracy of the DEMs created from the TLS scan data, 1,098 ground control points (GCPs) were surveyed using a real time kinematic global positioning system (RTK-GPS). Linear regressions were then applied to each DEM to remove vertical errors from the TLS point elevations, errors caused by the non-perpendicularity of the scanner’s vertical axis to the local horizontal plane, and errors correlated with the distance to the scanner’s position. The scans were then meshed to generate a DEMTLS with a 1 × 1 m spatial resolution. The Agisoft PhotoScan and MicMac software packages were used to process the aerial photographs and generate a DEMPSC (Agisoft PhotoScan) and DEMMCM (MicMac), respectively, with spatial resolutions of 1 × 1 m. Comparing the DEMs with the 1,098 GCPs showed that the DEMTLS was the most accurate data product, with a root mean square error (RMSE) of 4.5 cm, followed by the DEMMCM and the DEMPSC, which had RMSE values of 9.0 and 13.9 cm, respectively. The DEMPSC had absolute errors along the border of the study area that ranged from 15.0 to 52.0 cm, indicating the presence of systematic errors. Although the derived DEMMCM was accurate, an error analysis along a transect showed that the errors in the DEMMCM data tended to increase in areas of lower elevation. Compared with TLS, UAS is a promising tool for data collection because of its flexibility and low operational cost. However, improvements are needed in the photogrammetric processing of the aerial photographs to remove non-linear distortions. [less ▲]

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See detailDEM time series of an agricultural watershed
Pineux, Nathalie ULg; Lisein, Jonathan ULg; Swerts, Gilles ULg et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2014), 16

the field data come from plot scale studies, the watershed scale seems to be more appropriate to understand them. Currently, small unmanned aircraft systems and images treatments are improving. In this ... [more ▼]

the field data come from plot scale studies, the watershed scale seems to be more appropriate to understand them. Currently, small unmanned aircraft systems and images treatments are improving. In this way, 3D models are built from multiple covering shots. When techniques for large areas would be to expensive for a watershed level study or techniques for small areas would be too time consumer, the unmanned aerial system seems to be a promising solution to quantify the erosion and deposition patterns. The increasing technical improvements in this growth field allow us to obtain a really good quality of data and a very high spatial resolution with a high Z accuracy. In the center of Belgium, we equipped an agricultural watershed of 124 ha. For three years (2011-2013), we have been monitoring weather (including rainfall erosivity using a spectropluviograph), discharge at three different locations, sediment in runoff water, and watershed microtopography through unmanned airborne imagery (Gatewing X100). We also collected all available historical data to try to capture the “long-term” changes in watershed morphology during the last decades: old topography maps, soil historical descriptions, etc. An erosion model (LANDSOIL) is also used to assess the evolution of the relief. Short-term evolution of the surface are now observed through flights done at 200m height. The pictures are taken with a side overlap equal to 80%. To precisely georeference the DEM produced, ground control points are placed on the study site and surveyed using a Leica GPS1200 (accuracy of 1cm for x and y coordinates and 1.5cm for the z coordinate). Flights are done each year in December to have an as bare as possible ground surface. Specific treatments are developed to counteract vegetation effect because it is know as key sources of error in the DEM produced by small unmanned aircraft systems. The poster will present the older and more recent changes of relief in this intensely exploited watershed and notably show how unmanned airborne imagery might be of help in DEM dynamic modelling to support soil conservation research. [less ▲]

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See detailUtilisation des drones comme outil de suivi de travaux de restauration : génération de séries temporelles d'orthomosaïques à très haute résolution et de modèles numériques de surface
Michez, Adrien ULg; Lisein, Jonathan ULg; Geerts, Cédric ULg et al

Poster (2013, October 15)

D'une invention initialement militaire, les drones - et les applications qui dérivent de leurs utilisation - tendent à se banaliser au sein du domaine civil. En terme d'applications géographiques, les ... [more ▼]

D'une invention initialement militaire, les drones - et les applications qui dérivent de leurs utilisation - tendent à se banaliser au sein du domaine civil. En terme d'applications géographiques, les micro-drones (< 2 kg) occupent un segment nouveau dans les techniques d’acquisition d'informations, à mi-chemin entre deux segments plus classiques, représentés par les techniques d'acquisitions « terrain » (LiDAR terrestre, lever topographique, cartographie GPS, ..) et l'imagerie aérienne (caméra métrique, LiDAR aérien, imagerie satellitale). A l'aide d'un micro-drone X100 (Gatewing-Trimble), l'Unité GRFMN a effectué différents survols du projet de restauration du ruisseau du Morby, entrepris dans le cadre du projet Life+ Walphy. Les survols ont permis la réalisation d'orthomosaïques et de MNS (à l'aide d'Agisoft Photoscan) aux différentes étapes du chantier. Une évaluation de la qualité des MNS photogrammétriques générés est réalisée sur base de données LiDAR aérien disponible sur la zone. Une comparaison des coûts sera également réalisée entre les différentes techniques d'acquisition de données topographiques déployées sur le site lors du projet : MNS photogrammétriques UAV et caméra large format, LiDAR aérien. [less ▲]

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See detailAerial surveys using an Unmanned Aerial System (UAS): comparison of different methods for estimating the surface area of sampling strips
Lisein, Jonathan ULg; Linchant, Julie ULg; Lejeune, Philippe ULg et al

in Tropical Conservation Science (2013), 6(4), 506-520

Conservation of natural ecosystems requires regular monitoring of biodiversity, including the estimation of wildlife density. Recently, unmanned aerial systems (UAS) have become more available for ... [more ▼]

Conservation of natural ecosystems requires regular monitoring of biodiversity, including the estimation of wildlife density. Recently, unmanned aerial systems (UAS) have become more available for numerous civilian applications. The use of small drones for wildlife surveys as a surrogate for manned aerial surveys is becoming increasingly attractive and has already been implemented with some success. This raises the question of how to process UAS imagery in order to determine the surface area of sampling strips within an acceptable confidence level. For the purpose of wildlife surveys, the estimation of sampling strip surface area needs to be both accurate and quick, and easy to implement. As GPS and an inertial measurement units are commonly integrated within unmanned aircraft platforms, two methods of direct georeferencing were compared here. On the one hand, we used the image footprint projection (IFP) method, which utilizes collinearity equations on each image individually. On the other hand, the Structure from Motion (SfM) technique was used for block orientation and georeferencing. These two methods were compared on eight sampling strips. An absolute orientation of the strip was determined by indirect georeferencing using ground control points. This absolute orientation was considered as the reference and was used for validating the other two methods. The IFP method was demonstrated to be the most accurate and the easiest to implement. It was also found to be less demanding in terms of image quality and overlap. However, even though a flat landscape is the type most widely encountered in wildlife surveys in Africa, we recommend estimating IFP sensitivity at an accentuation of the relief. [less ▲]

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See detailClassification of riparian forest species (individual tree level) using UAV-based Canopy Height Model and multi-temporal orthophotos (Vielsalm, Eastern Belgium)
Michez, Adrien ULg; Lisein, Jonathan ULg; Toromanoff, François ULg et al

Poster (2013, September 09)

Introduction : Despite their relatively low area coverage, riparian forests are central landscape features providing several ecosystem services. Nevertheless, they are critically endangered in European ... [more ▼]

Introduction : Despite their relatively low area coverage, riparian forests are central landscape features providing several ecosystem services. Nevertheless, they are critically endangered in European countries by human pressures (livestock grazing, land use conflicts, canalizations, waste water, ...) andalso by natural hazards such as the recent black alder (Alnus glutinosa) extensive decline caused by Phytophthora alni. In this study UAV is used to improve the characterization of riparian areas. Riparian forest species are identified at the individual tree level. The health condition of black alder is assessed. For this purpose a computer based approach has been developped, with low needs of specific operator ability or training. Methods : We used the Gatewing X100 to acquire 16 aerial photographs datasets (7 in classic RGB and 9 in RG NIR) during 5 days (form Augustus to October 2012). We processed a CHM in ArcGIS by combining a national Digital Terrain Model with a photogrammetric DSM generated from a single flight photographs dataset with the "MicMac" opensource platform. The 16 orthophotos were computed with Agisoft Photoscan. Based on the CHM and some basic vegetation index (mean NDVI), a classification/segmentation process was developped in eCognition allowing tree crown extraction. An amount of 113 metrics were computed in eCognition for every tree crown object. The metrics were both derived from the CHM raster and spectral information. Metrics were computed by band (object spectral mean and CHM mean, Harralick entropy, Skewness) but also with band combination (Green NDVI and NDVI). A reference dataset was also acquired through a field survey of 624 individual tree positions accurately localized. The health condition of the black alder was recorded during the field survey. A supervised classification algorithm was developed in R (Random Forest package). Results : Several classification trees were assessed trough global accuracy using the Out Of Bag (OOB) error. The best global accuracy (82%) was obtained when distinguishing the black alder (with no regards for health condition during field survey) from the rest of riparian forest objects. The global accuracy tended to decline when other species were added. When separating healthy black alders from those with symptoms, the global accuracy is 77%. Conclusions : Our study highlights the potential of UAV-based multitemporal orthophotos to identify riparian forest species and health conditions at the tree level. Future studies will focus on quick radiometrics corrections. This could improve global accuracy by reducing the variability caused by illumination conditions [less ▲]

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See detailUsing drones to count the elephants: a new approach of wildlife inventories
Linchant, Julie ULg; Vermeulen, Cédric ULg; Lisein, Jonathan ULg et al

Conference (2013, August 29)

The use of UASs (Unmanned Aerial Systems) in wildlife survey is still recent but the fast development of this technology shows great possibilities and it could soon become an inevitable tool in wildlife ... [more ▼]

The use of UASs (Unmanned Aerial Systems) in wildlife survey is still recent but the fast development of this technology shows great possibilities and it could soon become an inevitable tool in wildlife management. The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of inventories by UAS to survey large mammals in the Nazinga Game Ranch in the south of Burkina Faso. The Gatewing X100TM equipped with a Ricoh GR III camera was used to test the animal reaction as it passed, and their visibility on the images. A set of more than 7000 images was collected and observations revealed that only elephants (Loxodonta africana) were easily visible while medium and small sized mammals were not. At a height of 100 m the easy observation of elephant allows experts to enumerate them on images and no reaction was recorded as the UAS passed. We therefore implemented an aerial strip sample count along transects used for the annual wildlife foot count. A total of 34 elephants has been recorded on 4 transects, each overflown twice. The elephant density was estimated at 2.47 elephants/km2 with a coefficient of variation (CV%) of 36.10 %. UAS inventory of elephants is promising but improvements need to be done. The main drawback of our UAS was its autonomy. If we wish to replace manned aircraft survey of large areas (about 1000 km of transect per day vs 40 km for our UAS), increased endurance of small UAS is a requirement and the monitoring strategy should be adapted according to the sampling plan. Also, the UAS is as expensive as a second-hand light aircraft. However the logistic and flight implementation are easier, the running costs are lower and its use is safer. With technological evolution making civil UASs more efficient, they will be able to compete with light aircrafts for aerial wildlife surveys. [less ▲]

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See detailPhotogrammetry for forest inventory
Pierrot Deseilligny, Marc; Lisein, Jonathan ULg

Conference (2013, March 12)

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See detailUnmanned aerial survey of elephants
Vermeulen, Cédric ULg; Lejeune, Philippe ULg; Lisein, Jonathan ULg et al

in PLoS ONE (2013), 8(2),

The use of a UAS (Unmanned Aircraft System) was tested to survey large mammals in the Nazinga Game Ranch in the south of Burkina Faso. The Gatewing ×100™ equipped with a Ricoh GR III camera was used to ... [more ▼]

The use of a UAS (Unmanned Aircraft System) was tested to survey large mammals in the Nazinga Game Ranch in the south of Burkina Faso. The Gatewing ×100™ equipped with a Ricoh GR III camera was used to test animal reaction as the UAS passed, and visibility on the images. No reaction was recorded as the UAS passed at a height of 100 m. Observations, made on a set of more than 7000 images, revealed that only elephants (Loxodonta africana) were easily visible while medium and small sized mammals were not. The easy observation of elephants allows experts to enumerate them on images acquired at a height of 100 m. We, therefore, implemented an aerial strip sample count along transects used for the annual wildlife foot count. A total of 34 elephants were recorded on 4 transects, each overflown twice. The elephant density was estimated at 2.47 elephants/km2 with a coefficient of variation (CV%) of 36.10%. The main drawback of our UAS was its low autonomy (45 min). Increased endurance of small UAS is required to replace manned aircraft survey of large areas (about 1000 km of transect per day vs 40 km for our UAS). The monitoring strategy should be adapted according to the sampling plan. Also, the UAS is as expensive as a second-hand light aircraft. However the logistic and flight implementation are easier, the running costs are lower and its use is safer. Technological evolution will make civil UAS more efficient, allowing them to compete with light aircraft for aerial wildlife surveys. [less ▲]

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See detailLe drone : un nouvel outil au service de l'inventaire des ressources forestières
Lisein, Jonathan ULg

Scientific conference (2013, January 15)

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See detailFeasibility study for elephant inventory with an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle
Lisein, Jonathan ULg; Vermeulen, Cédric ULg; Bouché, Philippe ULg et al

Scientific conference (2012, October 04)

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See detailCreation of a Canopy Height Model from mini-UAV Imagery
Lisein, Jonathan ULg; Bonnet, Stéphanie ULg; Lejeune, Philippe ULg

Poster (2012, September 12)

The arrival of mini-UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle), these small autonomous aircrafts, has opened the doors to a new environmental data acquisition’s approach. In forestry, low-altitude imagery from UAV can ... [more ▼]

The arrival of mini-UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle), these small autonomous aircrafts, has opened the doors to a new environmental data acquisition’s approach. In forestry, low-altitude imagery from UAV can be used to characterize forest ecosystem structure through a Canopy Height Model (CHM). In this research, authors developed a new workflow for acquiring low-altitude aerial images with a mini-UAV and used them for the construction of a high resolution Canopy Height Model. An accuracy analysis is performed and shows that individual dominant tree height can be measured from (UAV-photo-) CHM with a precision of 2 meters. [less ▲]

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See detailDeveloppement of an original aerial-based inventory method: first steps towards the use of mini Unmanned Areal Vehicle in elephant inventory
Lisein, Jonathan ULg; Vermeulen, Cédric ULg; Bouché, Philippe ULg et al

Scientific conference (2012, May 22)

This research aims at developping a new methodology for counting large mammals by means of an unmanned aerial vehicle. Test flights have been performed in the game ranch of Nazinga (Burkina Faso) during ... [more ▼]

This research aims at developping a new methodology for counting large mammals by means of an unmanned aerial vehicle. Test flights have been performed in the game ranch of Nazinga (Burkina Faso) during the month of february 2012. Aerial images shows that elephant detection is quite feasible. The systems still requires a lot of improvements in order to be able to cover bigger surfaces for a given pixels resolution. Nevertheless, this method seems very promissing and could advantageously replace traditionnal aerial-based inventory. [less ▲]

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See detailSimuler la ressource forestière à l'échelle d'un massif : application de SIMMEM et GYMNOS
Ligot, Gauthier ULg; Vallet, Patrick; Perin, Jérôme ULg et al

Conference (2012, April 02)

Detailed reference viewed: 35 (12 ULg)